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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (02-10-09 06:51 AM)

Flagstar Bancorp Inc. CEO MARK T HAMMOND bought 2500000 shares on 1-30-2009 at $0.8

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Where we say “we,” “us,” or “our,” we usually mean Flagstar Bancorp, Inc. In some cases, a reference to “we,” “us,” or “our” will include our wholly-owned subsidiary Flagstar Bank, FSB, and Flagstar Capital Markets Corporation (“FCMC”), its wholly-owned subsidiary, which we collectively refer to as the “Bank.”

General

The Company is a Michigan-based savings and loan holding company founded in 1993. Our business is primarily conducted through our principal subsidiary, Flagstar Bank, FSB (the “Bank”), a federally chartered stock savings bank. At December 31, 2007, our total assets were $15.8 billion, making us the largest publicly held savings bank in the Midwest and one of the top 15 largest savings banks in the United States.

The Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis (“FHLB”) and is subject to regulation, examination and supervision by the Office of Thrift Supervision (“OTS”) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). The Bank’s deposits are insured by the FDIC through the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”).

At December 31, 2007, we operated 164 banking centers (of which 42 are located in retail stores such as Wal-Mart) located in Michigan, Indiana and Georgia. We also operate 143 home loan centers located in 27 states. This includes an additional 13 banking centers we opened during 2007, including six in Georgia. Our plan over the next five years is to increase our earning asset base and banking center network. To do this, we plan to continue to add banking centers and grow our lending channels in an effort to expand our market share in the markets we serve and to penetrate new markets. Toward this goal, during 2008, we expect to expand our banking center network by up to 13 new banking centers, with seven in Georgia.

Our earnings include net interest income from our retail banking activities, and non-interest income from sales of residential mortgage loans to the secondary market, the servicing of loans for others, the sale of servicing rights related to mortgage loans serviced and fee-based services provided to our customers. Approximately 97.4% of our total loan production during 2007 represented mortgage loans and home equity lines of credit that were collateralized by first or second mortgages on single-family residences.

At December 31, 2007, we had 3,960 full-time equivalent salaried employees of which 877 are account executives and loan officers.

Operating Segments

Our business is comprised of two operating segments — banking and home lending. Our banking operation offers a line of consumer and commercial financial products and services to individuals and to small and middle market businesses through a network of banking centers (i.e., our bank branches) in Michigan, Indiana, and Georgia. Our home lending operation originates, acquires, sells and services mortgage loans on one-to-four family residences. Each operating segment supports and complements the operations of the other, with funding for the home lending operation primarily provided by deposits and borrowings obtained through the banking operation. Financial information regarding our two operating segments is set forth in Note 26 to our consolidated financial statements included in this report under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” A more detailed discussion of our two operating segments is set forth below.

Banking Operation. Our banking operation collects deposits and offers a broad base of banking services to consumer, municipal and commercial customers. We collect deposits at our 164 banking centers and via the Internet. We also sell certificates of deposit through independent brokerage firms. In addition to deposits, we borrow funds by obtaining advances from the FHLB or by entering into repurchase agreements using as collateral our mortgage-backed securities that we hold as investments. The banking operation invests these funds in a variety of consumer and commercial loan products.

We have developed a variety of deposit products ranging in maturity from demand-type accounts to certificates with maturities of up to ten years, savings accounts and money market accounts. We primarily rely upon our network of strategically located banking centers, the quality and efficiency of our customer service, and our pricing policies to attract deposits.

In past years, our national accounts division garnered funds through nationwide advertising of deposit rates and the use of investment banking firms (“wholesale deposits”). During 2005, 2006 and through June 2007, we did not solicit any funds through the national accounts division as we had access to more attractive funding sources through FHLB advances, security repurchase agreements and other forms of deposits that had the potential for a long term customer relationship. Beginning in July 2007, wholesale deposits became attractive from a cost of funds standpoint, so we began to solicit funds through this division again.

While our primary investment vehicle is single-family residential first mortgage loans originated or acquired by our home lending operation, our banking operation offers consumer and commercial financial products and services to individuals and to small to middle market businesses. During the past three years, we have placed increasing emphasis on commercial real estate lending and on expanding on our commercial lending as a diversification from our national mortgage lending platform. In 2006, we expanded our commercial real estate lending to add 19 states to diversify our lending activity beyond Michigan, Indiana and Georgia.

During 2007, we originated a total of $742.2 million in consumer loans versus $1.1 billion originated in 2006. At December 31, 2007, our consumer loan portfolio totaled $338.2 million or 4.1% of our investment loan portfolio, and contained $56.5 million of second mortgage loans, $179.8 million of home equity lines of credit, and $101.9 million of various other consumer loans.

We also offer a full line of commercial loan products and banking services especially developed for our commercial customers. Commercial loans are made on a secured or unsecured basis, but a vast majority are also collateralized by personal guarantees of the principals of the borrowing business. Assets providing collateral for secured commercial loans require an appraised value sufficient to satisfy our loan-to-value ratio requirements. We also generally require that our commercial customers maintain a minimum debt-service coverage ratio. In addition, we consider the creditworthiness and managerial ability of our borrowers, the enforceability and collectibility of any relevant guarantees and the quality of the collateral.

At December 31, 2007, our commercial real estate loan portfolio totaled $1.5 billion, or 19.2% of our investment loan portfolio, and our non-real estate commercial loan portfolio was $23.0 million, or 0.3% of our investment loan portfolio. At December 31, 2006, our commercial real estate loan portfolio totaled $1.3 billion or 14.6% of our investment loan portfolio, and our non-real estate commercial loan portfolio totaled $14.6 million, or 0.2% of our investment loan portfolio. During 2007, we originated $639.9 million of commercial loans versus $671.5 million in 2006.

We also offer warehouse lines of credit to other mortgage lenders. These lines allow the lender to fund the closing of a mortgage loan. Each extension or drawdown on the line is collateralized by the mortgage loan being funded, and in many cases, we subsequently acquire the mortgage loan. These lines of credit are, in most cases, personally guaranteed by a qualified principal officer of the borrower. The aggregate amount of warehouse lines of credit granted to other mortgage lenders at December 31, 2007, was $1.2 billion, of which $316.7 million was outstanding at December 31, 2007. At December 31, 2006, $1.2 billion in warehouse lines of credit had been granted, of which $291.7 million was outstanding.

Our banking operation also offers a variety of other value-added, fee-based banking services.

Home Lending Operation. Our home lending operation originates, acquires, sells and services single-family residential mortgage loans. The origination or acquisition of residential mortgage loans constitutes our most significant lending activity. At December 31, 2007, approximately 62.7% of our interest-earning assets consisted of first mortgage loans on single-family residences.

During 2007, we were one of the country’s leading mortgage loan originators. We utilize three production channels to originate or acquire mortgage loans — Retail, Broker and Correspondent. Each production channel produces similar mortgage loan products and applies, in most instances, the same underwriting standards.

• Retail. In a retail transaction, we originate the loan through our nationwide network of 143 home loan centers, as well as from our 164 banking centers located in Michigan, Indiana and Georgia and our national call center located in Troy, Michigan. When we originate loans on a retail basis, we complete the origination documentation inclusive of customer disclosure and other aspects of the lending process and fund the transaction internally. During 2007, we closed $2.0 billion of loans utilizing this origination channel, which equaled 7.8% of total originations as compared to $2.1 billion or 11.7% of total originations in 2006 and $4.0 billion or 14.2% of total originations in 2005.

• Broker. In a broker transaction, an unaffiliated mortgage brokerage company completes the loan paperwork, but we supply the funding for the loan at closing (also known as “table funding”) and thereby become the lender of record. At closing, the broker may receive an origination fee from the borrower and we may also pay the broker a fee to acquire the mortgage servicing rights on the loan. We currently have active broker relationships with over 6,200 mortgage brokerage companies located in all 50 states. Brokers remain our largest loan production channel. During 2007, we closed $12.4 billion utilizing this origination channel, which equaled 49.3% of total originations, as compared to $9.0 billion or 48.3% in 2006 and $16.1 billion or 57.1% in 2005.

• Correspondent. In a correspondent transaction, an unaffiliated mortgage company completes the loan paperwork and also supplies the funding for the loan at closing. We acquire the loan after the mortgage company has funded the transaction, usually paying the mortgage company a market price for the loan plus a fee to acquire the mortgage servicing rights on the loan. Unlike several of our competitors, we do not generally acquire loans in “bulk” from correspondents but rather, we acquire each loan on a loan-level basis and require that each loan be originated to our underwriting guidelines. We have active correspondent relationships with over 1,200 companies located in all 50 states. During 2007, we closed $10.8 billion utilizing this origination channel, which equaled 42.9% of total originations versus $7.2 billion or 40.0% originated in 2006 and $8.1 billion or 28.7% originated in 2005.

We maintain 15 sales support offices that assist our brokers and correspondents nationwide. We also continue to make increasing use of the Internet as a tool to facilitate the mortgage loan origination process through our broker and correspondent production channels. Our brokers and correspondents are able to register and lock loans, check the status of in-process inventory, deliver documents in electronic format, generate closing documents, and request funds through the Internet. Since 2006, virtually all mortgage loans that closed used the Internet in the completion of the mortgage origination or acquisition process. We expect to continue to utilize technology to streamline the mortgage origination process and bring service and convenience to our correspondent partners and customers.

Underwriting. Mortgage loans acquired or originated by the home lending operation are underwritten on a loan-by-loan basis rather than on a pool basis. In general, mortgage loans produced through any of our production channels are reviewed by one of our in-house loan underwriters or by a contract underwriter employed by a mortgage insurance company. However, certain of our correspondents have delegated underwriting authority. Any loan not underwritten by a Flagstar- employed underwriter must be warranted by the underwriter’s employer, whether it is a mortgage insurance company or correspondent mortgage company.

We believe that our underwriting process, which relies on the electronic submission of data and images and is based on an imaging workflow process, allows for underwriting at a higher level of accuracy and timeliness than exists with processes that rely on paper submissions. We also provide our underwriters with integrated quality control tools, such as automated valuation models (“AVMs”), multiple fraud detection engines and the ability to electronically submit IRS Form 4506s, to ensure underwriters have the information that they need to make informed decisions. The process begins with the submission of an electronic application and an initial determination of eligibility. The application and required documents are then faxed or uploaded to our corporate underwriting department and all documents are identified by optical character recognition or our underwriting staff. The underwriter is responsible for checking the data integrity and reviewing credit. The file is then reviewed in accordance with the applicable guidelines established by us for the particular product.

Quality control checks are performed by the underwriting department, using the tools outlined above, as necessary, and a decision is then made and communicated to the prospective borrower.

Mortgage Loans. All mortgage loans acquired or originated by our home lending operation are collateralized by a first mortgage on a one-to-four family residential property. A large majority of our mortgage loan products conform to the respective underwriting guidelines established by Fannie Mae, Ginnie Mae or Freddie Mac, which we collectively refer to as the “Agencies”. We generally require that any first mortgage loan with a loan-to-value ratio in excess of 80% carry mortgage insurance. A loan-to-value ratio is the percentage that the original principal amount of a loan bears to the appraised value of the mortgaged property at the time of underwriting. However, in the case of a purchase money mortgage loans, in which the loan proceeds are used to acquire the property rather than refinance an existing mortgage loan, we use the lower of the appraised value of the property or the purchase price of the property securing the loan in determining this ratio. We also verify the reasonableness of the appraised value of loans by utilizing an AVM. We generally require a lower loan-to-value ratio, and thus a higher down payment, for loans on homes that are not occupied as a principal residence by the borrower. In addition, all first mortgage loans originated are subject to requirements for title, flood, windstorm, fire, and hazard insurance. Real estate taxes are generally collected and held in escrow for disbursement. We are also protected against fire or casualty loss on home mortgage loans by a blanket mortgage impairment insurance policy that insures us when the mortgagor’s insurance is inadequate.

Construction Loans. Our home lending operation also makes short-term loans for the construction of one-to-four family residential housing throughout the United States, with a large concentration in our southern Michigan market area. These construction loans usually convert to permanent financing upon completion of construction. All construction loans are collateralized by a first lien on the property under construction. Loan proceeds are disbursed in increments as construction progresses and as inspections warrant. Construction/permanent loans may have adjustable or fixed interest rates and are underwritten in accordance with the same terms and requirements as permanent mortgages, except that during a construction period, generally up to nine months, the borrower is required to make interest-only monthly payments. Monthly payments of principal and interest commence one month from the date the loan is converted to permanent financing. Borrowers must satisfy all credit requirements that would apply to permanent mortgage loan financing prior to receiving construction financing for the subject property. During 2007, we originated a total of $126.7 million in construction loans versus $114.8 million originated in 2006 and $103.9 million originated in 2005. At December 31, 2007, our portfolio of loans held for investment included $90.4 million of loans secured by properties under construction, or 1.12% of total loans held for investment.

Secondary Market Loan Sales and Securitizations. We sell a majority of the mortgage loans we produce into the secondary market on a whole loan basis or by securitizing the loans into mortgage-backed securities.

Most of the mortgage loans that we sell are securitized through the Agencies. In an Agency securitization, we exchange mortgage loans that are owned by us for mortgage-backed securities that are guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac or insured through Ginnie Mae and are collateralized by the same mortgage loans that were exchanged. Most or all of these mortgage-backed securities may then be sold to secondary market investors, which may be the Agencies or other third parties in the secondary market. We receive cash payment for these securities upon the settlement dates of the respective sales, at which time we also transfer the related mortgage-backed securities to the purchaser.

We have also securitized a smaller portion of our mortgage loans through a process which we refer to as a private-label securitizations, to differentiate it from an Agency securitization. In a private-label securitization, we sell mortgage loans to our wholly-owned bankruptcy remote special purpose entity, which then sells the mortgage loans to a separate, transaction-specific trust formed for this purpose in exchange for cash and certain interests in the trust and those mortgage loans. Each trust then issues and sells mortgage-backed securities to third party investors that are secured by payments on the mortgage loans. These securities are rated by two of the nationally recognized statistical rating organizations (i.e. — rating agencies.) We have no obligation to provide credit support to either the third-party investors or the trusts, although we are required to make certain servicing advances with respect to mortgage loans in the trusts. Neither the third-party investors nor the trusts generally have recourse to our assets or us, nor do they have the ability to require us to repurchase their mortgage-backed securities. We do not guarantee any mortgage-backed securities issued by the trusts. However, we do make certain customary representations and warranties concerning the mortgage loans as discussed below, and if we are found to have breached a representation or warranty, we could be required to repurchase the mortgage loan from the applicable trust. Each trust represents a “qualifying special purpose entity,” as defined under Statement of Financial Accounting Standard (“SFAS”) 140, Accounting for Transfer and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of Liabilities, a replacement of FASB Statement No. 125, and therefore is not consolidated for financial reporting purposes.

In addition to the cash we receive from the securitization of mortgage loans, we retain certain interests in the securitized mortgage loans and the trusts. Such retained interests include residual interests, which arise as a result of our private-label securitizations, and mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”), which can arise as a result of our Agency securitizations, our private-label securitizations, or both.

The residual interests created upon the issuance of private-label securitizations represent the first loss position and are not typically rated by any nationally recognized statistical rating organization. The value of residual interests represents the present value of the future cash flows expected to be received by us from the excess cash flows created in the securitization transaction. Excess cash flows are dependent upon various factors including estimated prepayment speeds, credit losses and over-collateralization requirements. Residual interests are not typically entitled to any cash flows until both the over-collateralization account, which represents the difference between the bond balance and the value of the collateral underlying the security, has reached a certain level and certain expenses are paid. The over-collateralization requirement may increase if certain events occur, such as increases in delinquency rates or cumulative losses. If certain expenses are not paid or over-collateralization requirements are not met, the trustee applies cash flows to the over-collateralization account until such requirements are met and no excess cash flows would flow to the residual interest. A delay in receipt of, or reduction in the amount of excess cash flows would result in a lower valuation of the residual interests.

Residual interests are designated by us as trading or available-for-sale securities at the time of securitization and are periodically evaluated for impairment. The available-for-sale residual interests are marked to market with changes in the value recognized in other comprehensive income, net of tax. If available-for-sale residual interests are deemed to be impaired and the impairment is considered other-than-temporary, the impairment is recognized in the current period earnings. The trading residual interests are marked to market in the current period earnings. We use an internally developed model to value the residual interest. The model takes into consideration the cash flow structure specific to each transaction, such as over-collateralization requirements and trigger events, and key valuation assumptions, including credit losses, prepayment rates and discount rates.

Upon our sale of mortgage loans, we may retain the servicing of the securitized mortgage loans, or even sell them to other secondary market investors. In general, we do not sell the servicing rights to mortgage loans that we originate for our own portfolio or that we privately securitize. When we retain MSRs, we are entitled to receive a servicing fee equal to a specified percentage of the outstanding principal balance of the loans. We may also be entitled to receive additional servicing compensation, such as late payment fees and earn additional income through the use of non-interest bearing escrows.

When we sell mortgage loans, whether through Agency securitizations, private-label securitizations or on a whole loan basis, we make customary representations and warranties to the purchasers about various characteristics of each loan, such as the manner of origination, the nature and extent of underwriting standards applied and the types of documentation being provided. If a defect in the origination process is identified, we may be required to either repurchase the loan or indemnify the purchaser for losses it sustains on the loan. If there are no such defects, we have no liability to the purchaser for losses it may incur on such loan. We maintain a secondary market reserve to account for the expected losses related to loans we might be required to repurchase (or the indemnity payments we may have to make to purchasers). The secondary market reserve takes into account both our estimate of expected losses on loans sold during the current accounting period as well as adjustments to our previous estimates of expected losses on loans sold. In each case, these estimates are based on our most recent data regarding loan repurchases, actual credit losses on repurchased loans, loss indemnifications and recovery history, among other factors. Increases to the secondary market reserve for current loan sales reduce our net gain on loan sales. Adjustments to our previous estimates are recorded as an increase or decrease in our other fees and charges. The amount of our secondary market reserve equaled $27.6 million and $24.2 million at December 31, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

Loan Servicing. The home lending operation also services mortgage loans for others. Servicing residential mortgage loans for third parties generates fee income and represents a significant business activity for us. During 2007, 2006 and 2005, we serviced portfolios of mortgage loans that averaged $23.4 billion, $20.3 billion and $26.8 billion, respectively. The servicing generated gross revenue of $91.1 million, $82.6 million and $103.3 million in 2007, 2006, and 2005, respectively. This revenue stream was offset by the amortization of $78.3 million, $69.6 million and $94.5 million in previously capitalized values of MSRs in 2007, 2006, and 2005, respectively. When a loan is prepaid or refinanced, any remaining MSR for that loan is fully amortized and therefore amortization expense in a period could exceed loan administration income. During a period of falling or low interest rates, the amount of amortization expense typically increases because of prepayments and refinancing of the underlying mortgage loans. During a period of higher or rising interest rates, payoffs and refinancing typically slow, reducing the rate of amortization.

As part of our business model, we occasionally sell MSRs into the secondary market if we determine that market prices provide us with an opportunity for appropriate profit or for capital management, balance sheet management or interest rate risk purposes. Over the past three years, we sold $40.3 billion of loans serviced for others underlying our MSRs, including $3.6 billion in 2007. The MSRs are sold in transactions separate from the sale of the underlying loans. At the time of the sale, we record a gain or loss based on the selling price of the MSRs less the carrying value and transaction costs. The market price of MSRs changes with demand and the general level of interest rates.

Other Business Activities

We conduct business through a number of wholly-owned subsidiaries in addition to the Bank.

Douglas Insurance Agency, Inc. Douglas Insurance Agency, Inc. (“Douglas”) acts as an agent for life insurance and health and casualty insurance companies. Douglas also acts as a broker with regard to certain insurance product offerings to employees and customers. Douglas’ activities are not material to our business.

Flagstar Reinsurance Company. Flagstar Reinsurance Company (“FRC”) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company that was formed during 2007 as a successor in interest to another wholly-owned subsidiary, Flagstar Credit Inc., a reinsurance company which was subsequently dissolved in 2007. FRC is a reinsurance company that provides credit enhancement with respect to certain pools of mortgage loans underwritten and originated by us during each calendar year. With each pool, all of the primary risk is initially borne by one or more unaffiliated private mortgage insurance companies. A portion of the risk is then ceded to FRC by the insurance company, which remains principally liable for the entire amount of the primary risk. To effect this, the private mortgage insurance company provides loss coverage for all foreclosure losses up to the entire amount of the “insured risk” with respect to each pool of loans. The respective private mortgage insurance company then cedes a portion of that risk to FRC and pays FRC a corresponding portion of the related premium. The mortgage insurance company usually retains the portion of the insured risk ranging from 0% to 5% and from 10.01% to 100% of the insured risk. FRC’s share of the total amount of the insured risk is an intermediate tranche of credit enhancement risk which covers the 5.01% to 10% range, and therefore its maximum exposure at any time equals 5% of the insured risk of the insured pools. At December 31, 2007, FRC’s maximum exposure amounted to $143.9 million. Pursuant to our individual agreements with the private mortgage insurance companies, we are obligated to maintain cash in a separately managed account for the benefit of these mortgage insurance companies to cover any losses experienced in the portion ceded to us. The amounts we maintain are determined periodically by these companies and reflect their overall assessment at the time of our probability of maximum loss related to our ceded portion and the related severity of such loss. Pursuant to these agreements, we are not obliged to provide any funds to the mortgage insurance companies to cover any losses in our ceded portion other than the funds we are required to maintain in this separately managed account. At December 31, 2007, this separately managed account had a balance of $26.1 million. However, we believe the actual risk of loss is much lower because the credit enhancement is provided on an aggregated pool basis rather than on an individual loan basis. Also, FRC’s obligation is subordinated to the primary insurers, and we believe that the insured mortgage loans are fully collateralized. As such, while FRC does bear some risk in the structure, we believe FRC’s actual risk exposure is minimal. As of December 31, 2007, no claim had been made against FRC on the mortgage loan credit enhancement it provides.

Flagstar Credit, Inc. Flagstar Credit, Inc. (“FCI”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, transferred all of its assets to FRC effective October 1, 2007. The transfer was with the approval of each of the mortgage insurers and all actual and contingent liabilities that FCI had at the time were assumed by FRC without any further recourse to FCI and FRC succeeded to all rights and obligations of the agreements with the private mortgage insurers. Following this transfer, FRC has continued the operations of FCI without change and FCI ceased operation and was dissolved in 2007.

Paperless Office Solutions, Inc. Paperless Office Solutions, Inc. (“POS”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, provides on-line paperless office solutions for mortgage originators. DocVelocity is the flagship product developed by POS to bring web-based paperless mortgage processing to mortgage originators.

Other Flagstar Subsidiaries. In addition to the Bank, Douglas, FRC and POS, we have a number of wholly-owned subsidiaries that are inactive. We also own nine statutory trusts that are not consolidated with our operations. For additional information, see Notes 2 and 15 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, in Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplemental Data, herein.

Flagstar Bank. The Bank, our primary subsidiary, is a federally chartered, stock savings bank headquartered in Troy, Michigan. The Bank is also the sole shareholder of FCMC.

Flagstar Capital Markets Corporation. FCMC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Bank and its functions include holding investment loans, purchasing securities, selling and securitizing mortgage loans, maintaining and selling mortgage servicing rights, developing new loan products, establishing pricing for mortgage loans to be acquired, providing for lock-in support, and managing interest rate risk associated with these activities.

Flagstar ABS LLC. Flagstar ABS LLC (“ABS”) is a wholly-owned subsidiary of FCMC that serves as a bankruptcy remote special purpose entity that has been created to hold trust certificates in connection with our private securitization offerings.

Other Bank Subsidiaries. The Bank, in addition to FCMC, also wholly-owns several other subsidiaries, all of which were inactive at December 31, 2007.

Regulation and Supervision

Both the Company and the Bank are subject to regulation by the OTS. Also, the Bank is a member of the FHLB and its deposits are insured by the FDIC through the DIF. Accordingly, it is subject to an extensive regulatory framework which imposes activity restrictions, minimum capital requirements, lending and deposit restrictions and numerous other requirements primarily intended for the protection of depositors, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole, rather than for the protection of shareholders and creditors. Many of these laws and regulations have undergone significant changes in recent years and are likely to change in the future. Future legislative or regulatory change, or changes in enforcement practices or court rulings, may have a significant and potentially adverse impact on our operations and financial condition. Our non-bank financial subsidiaries are also subject to various federal and state laws and regulations.

Holding Company Status and Acquisitions. The Company is a savings and loan holding company, as defined by federal banking law. We may not acquire control of another savings association unless the OTS approves such transaction and we may not be acquired by a company other than a bank holding company unless the OTS approves such transaction, or by an individual unless the OTS does not object after receiving notice. We may not be acquired by a bank holding company unless the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”) approves such transaction. In any case, the public must have an opportunity to comment on any such proposed acquisition and the OTS or Federal Reserve must complete an application review. Without prior approval from the OTS, we may not acquire more than 5% of the voting stock of any savings institution. In addition, the federal Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act generally restricts any non-financial entity from acquiring us unless such non-financial entity was, or had submitted an application to become, a savings and loan holding company on or before May 4, 1999. Also, because we were a savings and loan holding company prior to that date, we may engage in non-financial activities and acquire non-financial subsidiaries.

Capital Adequacy. The Bank must maintain a minimum amount of capital to satisfy various regulatory capital requirements under OTS regulations and federal law. There is no such requirement that applies to the Company. Federal law and regulations establish five levels of capital compliance: well-capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized. As of December 31, 2007, the Bank met all capital requirements to which it was subject and satisfied the requirements to be treated as “well-capitalized” under OTS regulations. An institution is treated as well-capitalized if its ratio of total risk-based capital to risk-weighted assets is 10.0% or more, its ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets is 6.0% or more, its leverage ratio (also referred to as its core capital ratio) is 5.0% or more, and it is not subject to any federal supervisory order or directive to meet a specific capital level. In contrast, an institution is only considered to be “adequately capitalized” if its capital structure satisfies lesser required levels, such as a total risk-based capital ratio of not less than 8.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of not less than 4.0%, and (unless it is in the most highly-rated category) a leverage ratio of not less than 4.0%. Any institution that is neither well capitalized nor adequately capitalized will be considered undercapitalized. Any institution with a tangible equity ratio of 2.0% or less will be considered critically undercapitalized.

On November 1, 2007, the OTS and the other U.S. banking agencies issued final regulations implementing the new risk-based regulatory capital framework developed by The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which is a working committee established by the central bank governors of certain industrialized nations, including the United States. The new risk-based regulatory capital framework, commonly referred to as Basel II, includes several methodologies for determining risk-based capital requirements, and the U.S. banking agencies have so far only adopted methodology known as the “advanced approach.” The implementation of the advanced approach is mandatory for the largest U.S. banks and optional for other U.S. banks.

For those other U.S. banks, the U.S. banking agencies had issued advance rulemaking notices through December 2006 that contemplated possible modifications to the risk-based capital framework applicable to those domestic banking organizations that would not be affected by Basel II. These possible modifications, known colloquially as Basel 1A, were intended to avoid future competitive inequalities between Basel I and Basel II organizations. However, the U.S. banking agencies withdrew the proposed Basel 1A capital framework in late 2007. Instead, in 2008, the U.S. banking agencies announced that they would issue a proposed rule that would allow all U.S. banks not subject to the advanced approach under Basel II with the option of adopting a “standardized approach” under Basel II. Upon issuance of the proposed rule, we will assess the potential impact that it may have on our business practices as well as the broader competitive effects within the industry.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

Overview

Operations of the Bank are categorized into two business segments: banking and home lending. Each segment operates under the same banking charter, but is reported on a segmented basis for financial reporting purposes. For certain financial information concerning the results of operations of our banking and home lending operations, see Note 26 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, in Item 8, Financial Statements, herein.

Banking Operation. We provide a full range of banking services to consumers and small businesses in Michigan, Indiana and Georgia. Our banking operation involves the gathering of deposits and investing those deposits in duration-matched assets consisting primarily of mortgage loans originated by our home lending operation. The banking operation holds these loans in its loans held for investment portfolio in order to earn income based on the difference, or “spread,” between the interest earned on loans and investments and the interest paid for deposits and other borrowed funds. At December 31, 2007, we operated a network of 164 banking centers and provided banking services to approximately 122,704 customers. We continue to focus on expanding our branch network in order to increase our access to retail deposit funding sources. As we open new branches, we believe that the growth in deposits will continue over time. During 2007, we opened 13 banking centers, including six banking centers in Georgia. During 2007, we expect to open seven additional branches in the Atlanta, Georgia area and five branches in Michigan.

Home Lending Operation. Our home lending operation originates, securitizes and sells residential mortgage loans in order to generate transactional income. The home lending operation also services mortgage loans on a fee basis for others and sells mortgage servicing rights into the secondary market. Funding for our home lending operation is provided primarily by deposits and borrowings obtained by our banking operation.

Summary of Operations

Our net loss for 2007 of ($39.2) million (loss of $0.64 per diluted share) represents a 152.1% decrease from the earnings of $75.2 million ($1.17 per diluted share) we achieved in 2006 and a decrease of 149.1% from the $79.9 million ($1.25 per diluted share) earned in 2005. The net loss during 2007 was affected by the following factors:


• Higher provision for loan losses due to an increase in delinquency rates and non-performing loans;

• Lower gain on sales of MSRs due to substantially lower volume of MSR sales;

• Higher gain on loan sales due to increased volume and a slight decrease in overall gain on sale spread;

• Impairment losses in residual interests and securities;

• Lower net interest income due to the increase in the average interest rate that we paid on our deposits and interest-bearing liabilities offset by a lower average interest rate that we earned on our interest-earning assets;

• Higher overhead costs in our banking group attributable in part to the 13 additional banking centers that were opened during the year as well as 14 banking centers opened in 2006 as part of our overall de novo branch bank strategy; and

• Higher overhead costs in our home lending operation due to an increase in the number of salaried and commissioned personnel attributable to an increase of 67 home loan centers opened during the year as we focused on increasing our retail lending capability.

See “Results of Operations” below.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and reflect general practices within our industry. Application of these principles requires management to make estimates or judgments that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. These estimates are based on information available to management as of the date of the consolidated financial statements. Accordingly, as this information changes, future financial statements could reflect different estimates or judgments. Certain policies inherently have a greater reliance on the use of estimates, and as such have a greater possibility of producing results that could be materially different than originally reported. The most significant accounting policies followed by us are presented in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 herein. These policies, along with the disclosures presented in the other financial statement notes and other information presented herein, provide information on how significant assets and liabilities are valued in the consolidated financial statements and how these values are determined. Management views critical accounting policies to be those that are highly dependent on subjective or complex judgments, estimates or assumptions, and where changes in those estimates and assumptions could have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements. Management currently views the determination of the allowance for loan losses, the valuation of MSRs, the valuation of residuals, the valuation of derivative instruments, and the determination of the secondary market reserve to be our critical accounting policies.

Allowance for Loan Losses. The allowance for loan losses represents management’s estimate of probable losses that are inherent in our loans held for investment portfolio, but which have not yet been realized as of the date of our consolidated statement of financial condition. We recognize these losses when (a) available information indicates that it is probable that a loss has occurred and (b) the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. We believe that the accounting estimates related to the allowance for loan losses are critical because they require us to make subjective and complex judgments about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. As a result, subsequent evaluations of the loan portfolio, in light of the factors then prevailing, may result in significant changes in the allowance for loan losses. Our methodology for assessing the adequacy of the allowance involves a significant amount of judgment based on various factors such as general economic and business conditions, credit quality and collateral value trends, loan concentrations, recent trends in our loss experience, new product initiatives and other variables. Although management believes its process for determining the allowance for loan losses adequately considers all of the factors that could potentially result in loan losses, the process includes subjective elements and may be susceptible to significant change. To the extent actual outcomes differ from management estimates, additional provision for loan losses could be required that could adversely affect operations or financial position in future periods.

Valuation of Mortgage Servicing Rights. When our home lending operation sells mortgage loans in the secondary market it usually retains the right to continue to service these loans and earn a servicing fee. At the time the loan is sold on a servicing retained basis, we record the mortgage servicing right as an asset at its fair value. Determining the fair value of MSRs involves a calculation of the present value of a set of market driven and MSR specific cash flows. MSRs do not trade in an active market with readily observable market prices. However, the market price of MSRs is generally a function of demand and interest rates. When mortgage interest rates decline, mortgage loan prepayments usually increase as customers refinance their loans. When this happens, the income stream from a MSR portfolio will decline. In that case, we may be required to amortize the portfolio over a shorter period of time or reduce the carrying value of our MSR portfolio. Accordingly, we must make assumptions about future interest rates and other market conditions in order to estimate the current fair value of our MSR portfolio. On an ongoing basis, we compare our fair value estimates to observable market data where available. On an annual basis, the value of our MSR portfolio is reviewed by an outside valuation expert. MSRs are recorded at the lower of carrying cost or fair market value.

From time to time, we sell some of these MSRs to unaffiliated purchasers in transactions that are separate from the sale of the underlying loans. At the time of the sale, we record a gain or loss based on the selling price of the MSRs less our carrying value and associated transaction costs.

Valuation of Residuals. Residuals are created upon the issuance of private-label securitizations. Residuals represent the first loss position and are not typically rated by the nationally recognized agencies. The value of residuals represents the present value of the future cash flows expected to be received by us from the excess cash flows created in the securitization transaction. In general, future cash flows are estimated by taking the coupon rate of the loans underlying the transaction less the interest rate paid to the investors, less contractually specified servicing and trustee fees adjusting for the effect of estimated prepayments and credit losses.

Cash flows are also dependent upon various restrictions and conditions specified in each transaction. For example, residual securities are not typically entitled to any cash flows unless over-collateralization has reached a certain level. The over-collateralization represents the difference between the bond balance and the collateral underlying the security. A sample of an over-collateralization structure may require 2% of the original collateral balance for 36 months. At month 37, it may require 4%, but on a declining balance basis. Due to prepayments, that 4% requirement is generally less than the 2% required on the original balance. In addition, the transaction may include an over-collateralization “trigger event,” the occurrence of which may require the over-collateralization to be increased. An example of such trigger event is delinquency rates or cumulative losses on the underlying collateral that exceed stated levels. If over-collateralization targets were not met, the trustee would apply cash flows that would otherwise flow to the residual security until such targets are met. A delay or reduction in the cash flows received will result in a lower valuation of the residual.

Residuals are designated as either available-for-sale or trading securities at the time of securitization and are periodically evaluated for impairment. These residuals are marked to market with changes in the value either recognized in other comprehensive income net of tax for available-for-sale securities or earnings for trading securities. If the available-for-sale security is deemed to be impaired and the impairment is other-than-temporary, the impairment is recognized in the current period earnings. We use an internally developed model to value the residuals. The model takes into consideration the cash flow structure specific to each transaction (such as over-collateralization requirements and trigger events). The key valuation assumptions include credit losses, prepayment rates and, to a lesser degree, discount rates.

Valuation of Derivative Instruments. We utilize certain derivative instruments in the ordinary course of our business to manage our exposure to changes in interest rates. These derivative instruments include forward sale commitments and interest rate swaps. We also issue interest rate lock commitments to borrowers in connection with single family mortgage loan originations. We recognize all derivative instruments on our consolidated statement of financial position at fair value. The valuation of derivative instruments is considered critical because many are valued using discounted cash flow modeling techniques in the absence of market value quotes. Therefore, we must make estimates regarding the amount and timing of future cash flows, which are susceptible to significant change in future periods based on changes in interest rates. Our interest rate assumptions are based on current yield curves, forward yield curves and various other factors. Internally generated valuations are compared to third party data where available to validate the accuracy of our valuation models.

Derivative instruments may be designated as either fair value or cash flow hedges under hedge accounting principles or may be undesignated. A hedge of the exposure to changes in the fair value of a recognized asset, liability or unrecognized firm commitment is referred to as a fair value hedge. A hedge of the exposure to the variability of cash flows from a recognized asset, liability or forecasted transaction is referred to as a cash flow hedge. In the case of a qualifying fair value hedge, changes in the value of the derivative instruments that are highly effective are recognized in current earnings along with the changes in value of the designated hedged item. In the case of a qualifying cash flow hedge, changes in the value of the derivative instruments that are highly effective are recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income until the hedged item is recognized in earnings. The ineffective portion of a derivative’s change in fair value is recognized through earnings. Derivatives that are non-designated hedges are adjusted to fair value through earnings. Throughout 2006 and 2007, we had no derivatives designated as fair value hedges. On January 1, 2008, we derecognized all of our cash flow hedges.

Secondary Market Reserve. We sell most of the residential mortgage loans that we originate into the secondary mortgage market. When we sell mortgage loans we make customary representations and warranties to the purchasers about various characteristics of each loan, such as the manner of origination, the nature and extent of underwriting standards applied and the types of documentation being provided. Typically these representations and warranties are in place for the life of the loan. If a defect in the origination process is identified, we may be required to either repurchase the loan or indemnify the purchaser for losses it sustains on the loan. If there are no such defects, we have no liability to the purchaser for losses it may incur on such loan. We maintain a secondary market reserve to account for the expected credit losses related to loans we may be required to repurchase (or the indemnity payments we may have to make to purchasers). The secondary market reserve takes into account both our estimate of expected losses on loans sold during the current accounting period, as well as adjustments to our previous estimates of expected losses on loans sold. In each case, these estimates are based on our most recent data regarding loan repurchases, actual credit losses on repurchased loans and recovery history, among other factors. Increases to the secondary market reserve for current loan sales reduce our net gain on loan sales. Adjustments to our previous estimates are recorded as an increase or decrease in our other fees and charges.

Like our other critical accounting policies, our secondary market reserve is highly dependent on subjective and complex judgments and assumptions. We continue to enhance our estimation process and adjust our assumptions. Our assumptions are affected by factors both internal and external in nature. Internal factors include, among other things, level of loan sales, as well as to whom the loans are sold, improvements to technology in the underwriting process, expectation of credit loss on repurchased loans, expectation of loss from indemnification payments made to loan purchasers, the expectation of the mix between repurchased loans and indemnifications, our success rate at appealing repurchase demands and our ability to recover any losses from third parties. External factors that may affect our estimate includes, among other things, the overall economic condition in the housing market, the economic condition of borrowers, the political environment at investor agencies and the overall U.S. and world economy. Many of the factors are beyond our control and lend to judgments that are susceptible to change.

Results of Operations

Net Interest Income

2007. During 2007, we recognized $209.9 million in net interest income, which represented a decrease of 2.3% compared to the $214.9 million reported in 2006. Net interest income represented 64.2% of our total revenue in 2007 as compared to 51.5% in 2006. Net interest income is primarily the dollar value of the average yield we earn on the average balances of our interest-earning assets, less the dollar value of the average cost of funds we incur on the average balances of our interest-bearing liabilities. For the year ended December 31, 2007, we had an average balance of $15.0 billion of interest-earning assets, of which $12.4 billion were loans receivable. Interest income recorded on these loans is reduced by the amortization of net premiums and net deferred loan origination costs. Interest income for 2007 was $905.5 million, an increase of 13.1% from the $800.9 million recorded 2006. Offsetting the increase in interest income was an increase in our cost of funds. The average cost of interest-bearing liabilities increased 9.3%, from 4.32% during 2006 to 4.72% in 2007, while the average yield on interest-earning assets increased only 5.4%, from 5.74% during 2006 to 6.05% in 2007. As a result, our interest rate spread during 2007 was 1.33% at year-end. The compression of our interest rate spread during the year, combined with an increase in nonperforming assets caused our net interest margin for 2007 to decrease to 1.40% from 1.54% during 2006. Our net interest margin was also affected by the decline in our ratio of interest-earning assets to interest-bearing liabilities, from 103% in 2006 to 101% in 2007. The Bank recorded an interest rate margin of 1.50% in 2007, as compared to 1.63% in 2006.

2006. During 2006, we recognized $214.9 million in net interest income, which represented an decrease of 12.7% compared to the $246.3 million reported in 2005. Net interest income represented 51.5% of our total revenue in 2006 as compared to 60.7% in 2005. Net interest income is primarily the dollar value of the average yield we earn on the average balances of our interest-earning assets, less the dollar value of the average cost of funds we incur on the average balances of our interest-bearing liabilities. For the year ended December 31, 2006, we had an average balance of $14.0 billion of interest-earning assets, of which $12.2 billion were loans receivable. Interest income recorded on these loans is reduced by the amortization of net premiums and net deferred loan origination costs. Interest income for 2006 was $800.9 million, an increase of 13.0% from the $708.7 million recorded in 2005. Offsetting the increase in earning assets was an increase in our cost of funds. Our interest-earning assets are funded with deposits and other short-term liabilities, primarily borrowings from the FHLB and security repurchase agreements. Typically, there is a spread between the long-term rates we earn on these mortgage loans and the short-term rates we pay on our funding sources. During 2006, the spread between these interest rates narrowed as short-term rates increased. The average cost of interest-bearing liabilities increased 23.8% from 3.49%, during 2005 to 4.32% in 2006, while the average yield on interest-earning assets increased only 9.8%, from 5.23% during 2005 to 5.74% in 2006. As a result, our interest rate spread during 2006 was 1.42% at year-end. The compression of our interest rate spread during the year caused our net interest margin for 2006 to decrease to 1.54% from 1.82% during 2005. The adverse effect of the spread compression was offset in part by the increase in our ratio of interest-earning assets to interest-bearing liabilities, from 102% in 2005 to 103% in 2006. The Bank recorded an interest rate margin of 1.63% in 2006, as compared to 1.88% in 2005.

Provision for Loan Losses

During 2007, we recorded a provision for loan losses of $88.3 million as compared to $25.4 million recorded during 2006 and $18.9 million recorded in 2005. The provisions reflect our estimates to maintain the allowance for loan losses at a level to cover probable losses in the portfolio for each of the respective periods.

The increase in the provision during 2007 as compared to 2006, which increased the allowance for loan losses to $104.0 million at December 31, 2007 from $45.8 million at December 31, 2006, reflects the increase in net charge-offs both as a dollar amount and as a percentage of the loans held for investment, and it also reflects the increase in overall loan delinquencies (i.e., loans at least 30 days past due) in 2007. Net charge-offs in 2007 totaled $30.1 million as compared to $18.8 million in 2006, resulting from increased charge-offs of home equity and first and second residential mortgage loans and commercial real estate loans. As a percentage of the average loans held for investment, net charge-offs in 2007 increased to 0.38% from 0.20% in 2006. At the same time, overall loan delinquencies increased to 4.03% of total loans held for investment at December 31, 2007 from 1.34% at December 31, 2006. Total delinquent loans increased to $327.4 million at December 31, 2007 as compared to $119.4 million at December 31, 2006. In 2007, the increase in delinquencies impacted all categories of loans within the held for investment portfolio. The overall delinquency rate on residential mortgage loans increased to 3.74% at December 31, 2007 from 1.59% at December 31, 2006. The overall delinquency rate on commercial real estate loans increased to 6.13% at December 31, 2007 from 0.66% at December 31, 2006.

The increase in the provision during 2006 as compared to 2005, which increased the allowance for loan losses to $45.8 million at December 31, 2006 from $39.1 million at December 31, 2005, reflects the increase in net charge-offs both as a dollar amount and as a percentage of the loans held for investment, and it also reflects the increase in overall loan delinquencies (i.e., loans at least 30 days past due) in 2006. Net charge-offs in 2006 totaled $18.8 million as compared to $18.1 million in 2005, reflecting increased charge-offs of home equity and second mortgage loans and of overdrafts from checking accounts. As a percentage of the average loans held for investment, net charge-offs in 2006 increased to 0.20% from 0.16% in 2005. At the same time, overall loan delinquencies increased to 1.34% of total loans held for investment at December 31, 2006 from 1.10% at December 31, 2005, Total delinquent loans increased to $119.4 million in 2006 as compared to $115.9 million in 2005. The increase in delinquencies related primarily to residential mortgage loans, increasing to 1.59% at December 31, 2006 from 1.16% at December 31, 2005, as well as slight increases in delinquencies of home equity and second mortgage loans.

See the section captioned “Allowance for Loan Losses” in this discussion for further analysis of the provision for loan losses.

Non-Interest Income

Our non-interest income consists of (i) loan fees and charges, (ii) deposit fees and charges, (iii) loan administration, (iv) net gain on loan sales, (v) net gain on sales of MSRs, (vi) net loss on securities available for sale, (vii) loss on trading securities, and (viii) other fees and charges. Our total non-interest income equaled $117.1 million during 2007, which was a 42.1% decrease from the $202.2 million of non-interest income that we earned in 2006. The primary reason for the decrease was the decrease in 2007 of net gains from sales of MSRs.

Loan Fees and Charges. Both our home lending operation and banking operation earn loan origination fees and collect other charges in connection with originating residential mortgages and other types of loans. In each period, we recorded fee income net of any fees deferred for the purposes of complying with Statement of Financial Accounting Standard (“SFAS”) 91, “Accounting for Non-Refundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases. ” During 2007, we recorded gross loan fees and charges of $78.0 million, an increase of $27.1 million from the $50.9 million recorded in 2006 and the $71.6 million recorded in 2005. The increase in loan fees and charges resulted from an increase in the volume of loans originated during 2007 compared to 2006.

In accordance with SFAS 91, loan origination fees are capitalized and added as an adjustment to the basis of the individual loans originated. These fees are accreted into income as an adjustment to the loan yield over the life of the loan or when the loan is sold. During 2007, we deferred $76.5 million of fee revenue in accordance with SFAS 91, compared to $43.4 million and $59.0 million, respectively, in 2006 and 2005. This increase results from a 32.1% increase in total loan production during 2007 over 2006, as well as, significant enhancements to our systems and processes with respect to the capture of direct loan fees and charges for all types of our loans. These enhancements have been in process since 2006 but were completed in 2007. We began the enhancement process as a result of our continued expansion of our lending products, particularly commercial real estate loans, second mortgage and home equity lines-of-credit.

Deposit Fees and Charges. Our banking operation collects deposit fees and other charges such as fees for non-sufficient funds checks, cashier check fees, ATM fees, overdraft protection, and other account fees for services we provide to our banking customers. The amount of these fees tends to increase as a function of the growth in our deposit base. Total deposit fees and charges increased 10.0% during 2007 to $23.0 million compared to $20.9 million during 2006 and $16.9 million during 2005. During that time, total customer accounts grew from 277,900 at January 1, 2006 to 293,236 at December 31, 2007.

Loan Administration. When our home lending operation sells mortgage loans in the secondary market, it usually retains the right to continue to service these loans and earn a servicing fee. When an underlying loan is prepaid or refinanced, the mortgage servicing right for that loan is fully amortized as no further fees will be earned for servicing that loan. During periods of falling interest rates, prepayments and refinancings generally increase and, unless we provide replacement loans, it will usually result in a reduction in loan servicing fees and increase amortization recorded on the MSR portfolio.

Our loan administration fees and MSR amortization can fluctuate significantly. Such fees are affected by the size of our loans serviced for others portfolio, which is affected by sales of MSRs, subservicing fees, late fees and ancillary income and past due status of serviced loans. When loans serviced for others become ninety days or more past due we cease accruing servicing fees on such loans. Amortization of MSRs can be affected by sales of MSRs and changes in interest rates that cause changes in prepayments of the underlying loans. Changes in loan administration fees and changes in amortization of MSRs will not necessarily occur in proportion.

During 2007, the volume of loans serviced for others averaged $23.4 billion, which represented a 15.3% increase from the $20.3 billion serviced during 2006. During 2007, we recorded $91.1 million in servicing fee revenue. The fee revenue recorded in 2007 was offset by $78.4 million of MSR amortization. During 2006, we recorded $82.6 million in servicing fee revenue which was offset by $69.6 million of MSR amortization. During 2007, the amount of loan principal payments and payoffs received on serviced loans equaled $3.2 billion, a 5.9% decrease from the 2006 total of $3.4 billion. The decrease was primarily attributable to a continuing decline in mortgage loan refinancing in 2007 due to, among other things, the global liquidity crisis and the decline in housing values throughout the United States.

Net Gain on Loan Sales. Our home lending operation records the transaction fee income it generates from the origination, securitization and sale of mortgage loans in the secondary market. The amount of net gain on loan sales recognized is a function of the volume of mortgage loans sold and the gain on sale spread achieved, net of related selling expenses. Net gain on loan sales is also increased or decreased by any mark to market pricing adjustments on loan commitments and forward sales commitments in accordance with SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments” (“SFAS 133”), increases to the secondary market reserve related to loans sold during the period, and related administrative expenses. The volatility in the gain on sale spread is attributable to market pricing, which changes with demand and the general level of interest rates. Generally, we are able to sell loans into the secondary market at a higher margin during periods of low or decreasing interest rates. Typically, as the volume of acquirable loans increases in a lower or falling interest rate environment, we are able to pay less to acquire loans and are then able to achieve higher spreads on the eventual sale of the acquired loans. In contrast, when interest rates rise, the volume of acquirable loans decreases and therefore we may need to pay more in the acquisition phase, thus decreasing our net gain achievable. Prior to the global liquidity crisis that arose in the third quarter of 2007, our net gain was also affected by declining spreads available from securities we sell that are guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and by an over-capacity in the mortgage business that had placed continuing downward pressure on loan pricing opportunities for conventional residential mortgage products. In the latter part of 2007, these trends began to reverse as competitors left the mortgage industry and spreads widened.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

Where we say “we,” “us,” or “our,” we usually mean Flagstar Bancorp, Inc. In some cases, a reference to “we,” “us,” or “our” will include our wholly-owned subsidiary Flagstar Bank, FSB, and Flagstar Capital Markets Corporation, its wholly-owned subsidiary, which we collectively refer to as the “Bank.”
General
Operations of the Bank are categorized into two business segments: banking and home lending. Each segment operates under the same banking charter, but is reported on a segmented basis for financial reporting purposes. For certain financial information concerning the results of operations of our banking and home lending operations, see Note 13 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, in Item 1, Financial Statements, herein.
Banking Operation. We provide a broad range of banking services to consumers, small businesses and municipalities in Michigan, Indiana and Georgia as well as to across the country through our internet banking operations. Our banking operation involves the gathering of deposits and investing those deposits in duration-matched assets consisting primarily of mortgage loans originated by our home lending operation. The banking operation holds these loans in its loans held for investment portfolio in order to earn income based on the difference, or “spread,” between the interest earned on loans and investments and the interest paid for deposits and other borrowed funds. At September 30, 2008, we operated a network of 173 banking centers and provided banking services to approximately 129,100 households. During the third quarter of 2008, we opened three banking centers in Georgia. During the first nine months of 2008, we consolidated an in-store Indiana branch into an existing traditional branch. During October 2008, we opened one additional branch in the Atlanta, Georgia area and one additional branch in Michigan. We do not expect to open any additional branches during the fourth quarter 2008.
Home Lending Operation. Our home lending operation originates, acquires, securitizes and sells residential mortgage loans on one-to-four family residences in order to generate transactional income. The home lending operation also services mortgage loans on a fee basis for others and occasionally sells mortgage servicing rights into the secondary market. Funding for our home lending operation is provided primarily by deposits and borrowings obtained by our banking operation.
Critical Accounting Policies
Various elements of our accounting policies, by their nature, are inherently subject to estimation techniques, valuation assumptions and other subjective assessments. In particular, we have identified five policies that, due to the judgment, estimates and assumptions inherent in those policies, are critical to an understanding of our consolidated financial statements. These policies relate to: (a) the determination of our allowance for loan losses; (b) the valuation of our MSRs; (c) the valuation of our residuals; (d) the valuation of our derivative instruments; and (e) the determination of our secondary market reserve. We believe that the judgment, estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements are appropriate given the factual circumstances at the time. However, given the sensitivity of our consolidated financial statements to these critical accounting policies, the use of other judgments, estimates and assumptions could result in material differences in our results of operations or financial condition.

Results of Operations
Net Loss
Three Months . Net loss for the three months ended September 30, 2008 was $(62.1) million, $(0.79) per share-diluted, a $30.0 million decrease from the loss of $(32.1) million, $(0.53) per share-diluted, reported in the comparable 2007 period. The overall decrease on a pretax basis resulted primarily from a $52.1 million increase in non-interest income and a $5.9 million increase in net interest income before provision offset by a $59.4 million increase in the provision for loan losses and a $45.9 million increase in non-interest expense.
Nine Months. Net loss for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 was $(56.9) million, $(0.83) per share-diluted, a $47.7 million decrease from the loss of $(9.2) million, $(0.15) per share-diluted, reported in the comparable 2007 period. The overall decrease on a pretax basis resulted from a $107.7 million increase in non-interest income and a $20.2 million increase in net interest income before provision offset by a $117.8 million increase in the provision for loan losses and an $85.2 million increase in non-interest expense.
Net Interest Income
Three Months . We recorded $59.8 million in net interest income before provision for loan losses for the three months ended September 30, 2008, a 10.9% increase from $53.9 million recorded for the comparable 2007 period. The increase reflects a $48.6 million decrease in interest income offset by a $54.5 million decrease in interest expense, primarily as a result of rates paid on deposits, FHLB advances and security repurchase agreements that decreased more than the decrease in yields earned on loans and securities. The increase in net interest income before provision for loan losses in the three months ended September 30, 2008, as compared to the same period in 2007, resulted despite a decrease of our average interest-earning assets by $2.8 billion and our average interest-paying liabilities by $2.4 billion.
Average interest-earning assets as a whole repriced down 28 basis points during the three months ended September 30, 2008 and average interest-bearing liabilities repriced down 75 basis points during the same period, resulting in the increase in our interest rate spread of 47 basis points to 1.74% for the three months ended September 30, 2008, from 1.27% for the comparable 2007 period. The Company recorded a net interest margin of 1.82% at September 30, 2008 as compared to 1.36% at September 30, 2007. At the Bank level, the net interest margin was 1.93% at September 30, 2008, as compared to 1.52% at September 30, 2007.
Nine Months . We recorded $176.0 million in net interest income before provision for loan losses for the nine months ended September 30, 2008, a 13.0% increase from $155.8 million recorded for the comparable 2007 period. The increase reflects an $80.2 million decrease in interest income offset by a $100.5 million decrease in interest expense. The increase in net interest income before provision for loan losses in the nine months ended September 30, 2008, as compared to the same period in 2007, resulted despite a decrease of our average interest-earning assets by $1.5 billion and our average interest-paying liabilities by $1.3 billion.

Non-Interest Income
Our non-interest income consists of (i) loan fees and charges, (ii) deposit fees and charges, (iii) loan administration, (iv) net gain (loss) on loan sales, (v) net gain on sales of MSRs, (vi) net gain (loss) on sales of securities available for sale, (vii) loss (gain) on trading securities and (viii) other fees and charges. During the three months ended September 30, 2008, non-interest income increased to $53.4 million from $1.3 million in the comparable 2007 period. During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, non-interest income increased to $206.3 million from $98.6 million in the comparable 2007 period.
Loan Fees and Charges . Both our home lending operation and banking operation earn loan origination fees and collect other charges in connection with originating residential mortgages and other types of loans.
Three months. Loan fees recorded during the three months ended September 30, 2008 totaled $0.8 million compared to a loss of $0.2 million recorded during the comparable 2007 period. This increase is the result of the increase in non-capitalizable fees during the period as a result of an increase in our mortgage loan production.
Nine months . Loan fees recorded during the nine months ended September 30, 2008 totaled $2.3 million compared to $1.3 million recorded during the comparable 2007 period. This increase is the result of the increase in non-capitalizable fees during the year as a result of an increase in our mortgage loan production.
Deposit Fees and Charges . Our banking operation records deposit fees and other charges such as fees for non-sufficient funds checks, cashier check fees, ATM fees, overdraft protection, and other account fees for services we provide to our banking customers.
Three months . During the three months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded $7.2 million in deposit fees versus $5.8 million in the comparable 2007 period. This increase is attributable to the increase in our non-sufficient funds fees and other depository fees as our banking franchise continues to expand.
Nine months. During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded $20.0 million in deposit fees versus $16.5 million recorded in the comparable 2007 period. This increase is attributable to the increase in our non-sufficient funds fees and other depository fees as our banking franchise continues to expand.
Loan Administration . When our home lending operation sells mortgage loans in the secondary market it usually retains the right to continue to service these loans and earn a servicing fee. Until January 1, 2008, our MSRs were accounted for on the amortization method; thereafter, the majority of our MSRs have been accounted for on the fair value method. See Note 9 Mortgage Servicing Rights, in Item 1. Financial Statements, herein.
Three Months . The loan administration income during the three month period ended September 30, 2008 increased to $25.7 million from $4.3 million during the comparable 2007 period. During 2008, we recorded revenues from servicing fees and ancillary income of $41.0 million offset by a mark to market adjustment of $14.8 million on the fair value of the residential MSRs and amortization on consumer mortgage servicing of $0.6 million. The mark to market adjustment was net of hedging losses of $14.4 million.
Included in our results of loan administration for both the three month and nine month periods ended September 30, 2008 is the effect of the failure of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 to honor its commitment to buy $65.0 million of excess servicing. The asset was sold in late August for late September settlement and was removed from the hedged position. In mid-September, we received confirmation of Lehman's.

failure to follow through on its commitment to purchase the asset. The asset was re-bid for indicative levels at that time at a $17.1 million reduction in value and the incremental exposure was subsequently re-hedged.
Nine Months. The loan administration income during the nine month period ended September 30, 2008 increased to $46.0 million from $10.1 million during the comparable 2007 period. During 2008, we recorded revenues from servicing fees and ancillary income of $106.7 million which was offset by amortization on consumer mortgage servicing of $1.9 million and a mark to market adjustment of $58.8 million on the fair value of the residential MSRs. The mark to market adjustment was net of hedging losses of $42.3 million. Although the fair value method of accounting was adopted effective January 1, 2008, we did not begin hedging the portfolio until the latter portion of the first quarter. During the 2007 period, we recorded revenues from servicing fees and ancillary income of $59.8 million which was offset by amortization of $52.7 million. The increase in the servicing fees and ancillary income in the 2008 period is due to the significant increase in the loans serviced during the 2008 period over the corresponding period in 2007. The total unpaid principal balance of loans serviced for others was $51.8 billion at September 30, 2008, versus $32.5 billion serviced at December 31, 2007, and $26.7 billion serviced at September 30, 2007.
Net Gain (Loss) on Loan Sales . Our home lending operation records the transaction fee income it generates from the origination, securitization, and sale of mortgage loans in the secondary market. The amount of net gain on loan sales recognized is a function of the volume of mortgage loans sold and the gain on sale spread achieved, net of related selling expenses. Net gain on loan sales is also increased or decreased by any mark to market pricing adjustments on loan commitments and forward sales commitments in accordance with SFAS 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments” (“SFAS 133”), increases to the secondary market reserve related to loans sold during the period, and related administrative expenses. The volatility in the gain on sale spread is attributable to market pricing, which changes with demand and the general level of interest rates. Generally, we are able to sell loans into the secondary market at a higher margin during periods of low or decreasing interest rates. Typically, as the volume of acquirable loans increases in a lower or falling interest rate environment, we are able to pay less to acquire loans and are then able to achieve higher spreads on the eventual sale of the acquired loans. In contrast, when interest rates rise, the volume of acquirable loans decreases and therefore we may be required to pay more in the acquisition phase, thus decreasing our net gain achievable. During 2008, our net gain was also affected by increasing spreads available from securities we sell that are guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and by a combination of a significant decline in residential mortgage lenders and a significant shift in loan demand to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac conforming residential mortgage loans and Ginnie Mae-insured loans, which has provided us with loan pricing opportunities for conventional residential mortgage products.

Three months . For the three months ended September 30, 2008, there was a net gain (loss) on loan sales of $22.2 million, as compared to a loss of $17.5 million in the 2007 period, an increase of $39.7 million. The 2008 period reflects the sale of $6.8 billion in loans versus $6.0 billion sold in the 2007 period. Management believes changes in market conditions during the 2008 period resulted in a slight increase in mortgage loan origination volume ($6.7 billion in the 2008 period vs. $6.6 billion in the 2007 period), allowing for increased sales in the third quarter of 2008, and an increased net gain (loss) on sale spread (33 basis points in the 2008 period versus a negative 29 basis points in the 2007 period).
Our calculation of net gain on loan sales reflects gross gains on loan sales, changes in amounts related to SFAS 133, lower of cost or market adjustments on loans transferred to held for investment and provisions to our secondary market reserve. Changes in amounts related to SFAS 133 amounted to $8.2 million and $8.5 million for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Lower of cost or market adjustments amounted to $12.0 million and $0.1 million for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Provisions to our secondary market reserve amounted to $2.4 million and $2.7 million, for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Also included in our net gain (loss) on loan sales is the capitalized value of our MSRs, which totaled $85.5 million and $93.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
Nine months. For the nine months ended September 30, 2008, net gain on loan sales increased $93.6 million to $129.4 million from the $35.8 million in the 2007 period. The 2008 period reflects the sale of $22.1 billion in loans versus $17.0 billion sold in the 2007 period. Management believes changes in market conditions during the 2007 period resulted in an increased mortgage loan origination volume ($22.6 billion in the 2008 period versus $19.2 billion in the 2007 period) and a higher overall gain on sale spread (59 basis points in the 2008 versus 21 basis points in the 2007 period).
Our calculation of net gain on loan sales reflects gross gains on loan sales, changes in amounts related to SFAS 133, lower of cost or market adjustments on loans transferred to held for investment and provisions to our secondary market reserve. Changes in amounts related to SFAS 133 amounted to $18.8 million and $0.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Lower of cost or market adjustments amounted to $34.7 million and $0.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Provisions to our secondary market reserve amounted to $8.2 million and $7.2 million, for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Also included in our net gain on loan sales is the capitalized value of our MSRs, which totaled $292.0 million and $247.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
Net Gain on Sales of Mortgage Servicing Rights . As part of our business model, our home lending operation occasionally sells MSRs from time to time in transactions separate from the sale of the underlying loans. Prior to 2008, at the time of the MSR sale, we record a gain or loss based on the selling price of the MSRs less our carrying value and transaction costs. Accordingly, the amount of net gains on MSR sales depends upon the gain on sale spread and the volume of MSRs sold. The spread is attributable to market pricing, which changes with demand and the general level of interest rates. Effective January 1, 2008, with the adoption of fair value accounting for MSRs, we would not expect to realize significant gains or losses at the time of sale. Instead, our income from MSRs would be recorded through loan administration income.
Three months. During the three month period ending September 30, 2008 and 2007, we did not sell any servicing rights on a bulk basis. For the three months ended September 30, 2008, we recognized a gain of $0.9 million on our change in the estimate of amounts receivable from past MSR sales. The $0.5 million gain on MSR sales for the three months ended September 30, 2007 resulted from the $95.5 million of servicing rights sold on a servicing released basis during that period.
Nine months. During the nine month period ending September 30, 2008, we did not sell any servicing rights on a bulk basis; however, for the same period in 2007 we sold servicing rights related to $2.0 billion of loans serviced for others on a bulk basis. For the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we recognized a gain of $0.3 million on our change in estimate of amounts receivable from past MSR sales.
Net (Loss) Gain on Sales of Securities Available for Sale. Securities classified as available for sale are comprised of U.S. government sponsored agency securities as well as non-agency securities. During 2007, securities classified as available for sale also included certain residual interests from private securitizations.
Three Months . Gains (losses) on the sale of agency securities available for sale that are recently created with underlying mortgage products originated by Flagstar are reported within net gain on loan sale. Securities in this category have typically remained in the portfolio less than 30 days before sale. During the three months ended September 30, 2008, sales of these agency securities with underlying mortgage products originated by Flagstar were $36.4 million resulting in $172,000 of net gain on loan sale.
During the three months ended September 30, 2008, we sold $13.8 million in available for sales securities consisting of agency securities. Gain (loss) on sales for these available for sale securities types are reported in net gain on sale of available for sales securities. These sales generated a $149,000 net gain on sale of available for sale securities.
During the three months ended September 30, 2007, we sold $84.2 million of securities available for sale which resulted in gains of $668,000. Also, during the three months ended September 30, 2007, we had a $3.6 million other-than-temporary impairment of our residual interests that arose from securitizations completed in 2005 and 2006. The other-than-temporary impairment arose during the third quarter of 2007 primarily from the increase in our credit loss assumptions for these securitizations.
The increase was caused by our recognition of the increasing losses in the underlying mortgages. The credit loss assumptions have increased by as much as 80% for certain securitizations.
Nine Months . During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, sales of agency securities with underlying mortgage products originated by Flagstar were $2.8 billion resulting in $1.7 million of net gain on loan sale. There were no such sales in the nine months ended September 30, 2007.
During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we sold $908.8 million in available for sales securities consisting of agency securities. These sales generated a $5.0 million net gain on sale of available for sale securities. In the nine months ended
September 30, 2007, we sold $255.2 million in purchased agency and non-agency securities available for sale. These sales generated net gains on sale of available for sale securities of $1.4 million. During the nine months ended September 30, 2007, we recognized a $3.6 million other-than-temporary impairment as described above. In 2008, such losses are recognized as “(loss) gain on trading securities.”

(Loss) Gain on Trading Securities. Securities classified as trading are comprised of residual interests from private-label securitizations. (Loss) gain on securities classified as trading is the result of a change in the estimated fair value of the securities.
Three Months . During the three months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded a $12.9 million loss on trading securities. The loss was primarily due to the increase in the estimated cumulative loss expectations which were only partially offset by the changes to prepayment speeds related to the loans underlying the residual interests. Additionally, during the third quarter certain of these assets were affected by the tightening of the spread between LIBOR and prime interest rates. These changes caused a reduction in the fair value of the residual interests from our private-label securitizations.
During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2007, we recognized an unrealized gain on trading securities of $1.9 million. Although certain assumptions relating to these residual interests were negatively adjusted during the third quarter of 2007, the value of these residual interests increased based on the reduction in interest rate paid to the senior investors. A significant portion of the bonds issued in the securitization are variable rate and as such the reduction of the interest rate on such bonds results in additional expected cash flow available to residual interests.
Nine Months. During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded a $26.5 million loss on trading securities. The loss was primarily due to the increase in the estimated cumulative loss expectations which were only partially offset by the changes to prepayment speeds related to the loans underlying the residual interests. These changes caused a reduction in the fair value of the residual interests from our private-label securitizations.
Other Fees and Charges . Other fees and charges include certain miscellaneous fees, including dividends received on FHLB stock and income generated by our subsidiaries.
Three months . During the three months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded $4.8 million in cash dividends received on FHLB stock, compared to $3.7 million received during the three months ended September 30, 2007. At September 30, 2008 and 2007, we owned $373.4 million and $331.1 million of FHLB stock, respectively. We also recorded $2.1 million and $0.9 million in subsidiary income for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We recorded $0.9 million and $0.6 million of penalty fees during the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. In addition, we recorded expense of $1.1 million and an income of $1.0 million related to adjustments to our estimates in calculating our secondary market reserve, for the three months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
Nine months. During the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we recorded $14.5 million in cash dividends received on FHLB stock, compared to the $11.1 million received during the nine months ended September 30, 2007. We also recorded $5.4 million and $2.5 million in subsidiary income for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We recorded $7.7 million and $6.4 million in various fee and miscellaneous income during the nine months ended September 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively. In addition, we recorded income of $0.5 million and an expense of $4.4 million relating to adjustments to our estimates in calculating our secondary market reserve for the nine months ended September 30, 2008 and 2007, respectively.

CONF CALL

Mark Hammond

Welcome to Flagstar’s fourth quarter earnings conference call. My name is Mark Hammond and I am the Chief Executive Officer of Flagstar. Please note that we will be using a PowerPoint presentation during this call and we recommend that you refer to it as we reference it throughout the call. This presentation, as well as our earnings press release that we issued last evening, which contains detailed financial tables, is posted on our website in the investor’s relations section at www.flagstar.com.

I’m here today with Thomas Hammond, our Chairman of the Board, and Paul Borja our Chief Financial Officer. Tom will provide prepared remarks and then I will talk briefly. Paul and I will then answer questions. Please note that we will be addressing the questions that we received by email or questions that we’ve been frequently asked. Before we get started, please first direct your attention to the legal disclaimer on the second page in the presentation. The content of our call today will be governed by that language.

With that, I will turn the call over to our Chairman, Tom Hammond.

Thomas Hammond

Last evening we announced our financial results for the fourth quarter of 2008. Despite the virtual shutdown of the capital markets for investments and financial institutions, this morning we are in the process of closing our previously announced transactions in which MP Thrift Investments, a newly formed affiliate of Maitlin Patterson Global Advisers LLC, will invest $250 million and management will invest $5.32 million into Flagstar Bank Corp.

In addition, the U.S. Treasury will invest $266.6 million pursuant to the TARP capital purchase program for a total investment of $523 million. We have also been successful on obtaining a commitment from MP Thrift Investments to inject an addition $100 million in capital in the Flagstar Bank Corp during the first quarter.

Approximately 90% of the funds from these transactions will be down streamed to Flagstar Bank as Tier 1 regulatory capital. We plan to use the additional capital to increase our Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and Jenny Mae lending by capitalizing on market opportunities created through the industry consolation and the low interest rate environment.

In addition, we are going to look for opportunities to invest in mortgage-backed securities with attractive yields. Further, we plan to operate at regulatory capital levels higher than we have had in the last couple years. The fourth quarter of 2008 was an especially challenging period for most banks as the economy and residential home value continued to deteriorate.

Our fourth quarter financial results are reflective of those challenges. As the fourth quarter developed, we shifted our focus away from new loan production to focus on capital preservation and increase liquidity. During the period, we substantially increased our reserves and took significant credit charges and asset write-downs. Those items totaled $292 million in pre-taxed costs, which are outlined on page three of the presentation.

Item 1, in the fourth quarter we had a provision for loan losses of $176.3 million, of which $24.3 million were charge-offs with remaining $152 million being used to increase our allowance for loan losses. Item 2, we wrote down the value of our mortgage servicing rights by $270 million mostly offset by hedging gains, contributing to a loss on loan administration income of $46.2 million.

Item 3, we had a $43.7 million other than temporary impairment related to two of our available for sale non-agency securities. Item 4, we also had $26.2 million of credit and mortgage related costs flowing through our non-interest expense. That is comprised of $16.4 million evaluation adjustment related to our real estate owned portfolio and a $9.8 million reserve for anticipated mortgage insurance losses in our reinsurance subsidiary.

Please turn to page four. In 2008, we increased our full year bank net interest margin by almost 18% from 150 basis points in 2007 to 178 basis points in 2008. For the fourth quarter, our bank net interest margin decreased to 161 basis points from 193 basis points in the third quarter. The decrease in net interest margin from the previous quarter is the result of the following four factors. First, the Federal Reserve dramatically lowered interest rates by 175 basis points during the quarter. As a result, our prime rate based assets re-priced faster than our liabilities causing our margin to compress.

Second, our fourth quarter net interest margin was negatively impact by our significantly cash balances. During the period, we maintained a daily average cash and cash equivalent position of approximately $1 billion, which created a negative spread. This resulted in a significantly higher liquidity position then we have had historically. Third, we experienced lower interest income due to a reduced available for sale balance. Fourth, the increase in non-performing assets put additional strains on our margin.

Turning to page five, our gain on loan sell margin was 29 basis points for the fourth quarter as compared to 33 basis points in the third quarter. Full year 2008 gain on sale was 53 basis points as compared to 24 basis points for 2007. As of December 31st, we estimate there was an embedded gain of approximately $40 million in our closed loan inventory that we anticipate to recognize subject to market changes over the course of the first quarter. In addition, for loans closed on or after January 1, 2009, we have elected fair value accounting for our closed loan inventory, which should mitigate the accounting lag associated with the gain on sale of loans previously held at lower of cost or market.

In December, our gain on loan sell margin was 138 basis points and preliminary indications are that the gain on loan sale margin for January will be strong. In the fourth quarter, we had a loss of net loaned administration income of $46.2 million. Although we lost money on our mortgage servicing rights, by writing it down by $270 million, there is less asset at risk. Recent government intervention, including the Federal Reserve lowering interest rates by 175 basis points and the treasury announcing that they we’re going to purchase $500 billion of mortgage-backed securities, created an extremely challenging environment for hedging this asset.

Now let’s talk about loan production. Turning to page six, you see that we have increased our residential first mortgage loan production in each of the last two years. For 2008, we originated $28 billion of residential first mortgages as compared to $25 billion in 2007 and $20 billion on 2006. Since 2006, we have increased our residential first mortgage production by an average of approximately 20% per year.

Please turn to page seven. Our fourth quarter loan production trended downward from the prior quarters as we were not as focused on the production volume as we were in prior quarters. In the fourth quarter, we originated $5.4 billion of residential first mortgages as compared to $6.8 billion in the third quarter. As has been the case for the majority of 2008, we only intend on originating Fannie, Freddie or FHA insured residential first mortgages for sale. In late 2008 as mortgage rates dropped to historic lows, we saw a spike in locked volume. If you take a look at page eight, nine and ten, you see that December loan rate lock commitments were at historic highs.

Recent publications ranked Flagstar as the tenth largest residential loan originator in the country, the fifth largest FHA loan originator in the country, and the fourth largest residential wholesale lender in the country. Given the industry consolidation, we anticipate further market share gain.

Overhead expenses before FASB 91 and credit costs, which are reflected as non-interest expense, were lower by $9.8 million compared to the third quarter even as we continue to add loan servicing collection and lost mitigation staff. We will continue to aggressively manage overhead. In addition, we intend to seek additional fee revenue enhancements.

Now let’s turn to liquidity. Please turn to page 11. During the fourth quarter, our retail deposits increased to $5.4 billion from $4.9 billion in the third quarter. For the year, retail deposits increased by 5.5% from $5.1 billion at the end of 2007 to $5.4 billion at the end of 2008. We were able to increase core deposits in a difficult market by maintaining our focus on customer service and through our effective advertising efforts.

Although we increased our retail deposit portfolio, we did not do so at the expense of our funding cost. For the quarter, our retail deposit funding cost decreased from weighted average cost of 348 basis points for the quarter ending September 30, 2008 to 340 basis points for the quarter ending December 31, 2008. We see these trends continuing as January retail deposit growth has been strong and funding costs continue to decrease.

During the fourth quarter, we opened two new banking centers bringing our total to 175 at December 31, 2008. Of these, one was in Michigan and one was in Georgia. For 2008, we opened 13 new banking centers. At this time, our goal is to continue to manage overhead and as such, we intend on opening only three banking centers in 2009, which are already under contract. In the fourth quarter, we opened over 2,200 net new checking accounts and over 340 net new savings accounts. For 2008, we opened over 11,000 net new checking and over 4,400 net new savings accounts. At the end of 2008, we had opened over 300,000 total retail accounts.

Now let’s talk about our assts. Please turn to page 12. For the quarter, our balance sheet remained relatively flat with total assets of $14.2 billion at December 31, 2008 from $14.1 billion at September 30, 2008. Our available for sale portfolio decreased to $1.5 billion at December 31, 2008 from $1.9 billion at September 30, 2008. Our held for investment loan portfolio decreased to $9.0 billion at December 31, 2008 from $9.1 billion at September 30, 2008, as we are not originating any loans intended for our investment portfolio.

Slides 13 through 16 provide further analysis of our residential first mortgage portfolio by state, current loan-to-value, FICO score, and vintage year. Of the loans with an 80% LTV or higher, virtually all are covered by mortgage insurance. Page 17 provides further detail on our non-agency securities portfolio and page 18 provides information on our real estate owned portfolio.

Let’s now discuss asset quality. Page 19 identifies our key asset quality ratios. In fourth quarter we had significant reserves increasing our allowance for loan loss to $376 million at the end of the period. Our fourth quarter increase in provision was mostly to increase our allowance for loan losses as charge-offs were $24 million for the quarter.

Our asset quality by loan type, including breakout of general and specific reserves, are identified on page 20. As you can see, the majority of the specific reserves are related to our commercial real estate portfolio. We also increased our secondary marketing reserve for losses on repurchased loans by $12.5 million to $42.5 million at December 31, 2008.

Turning to page 21, you can see that our 30-day and 60-day delinquency rates had been relatively flat over the last six months, however, the 90-day delinquency rates still continue to rise. One contributing factor to the increase in 90-day delinquencies is a reduction in foreclosure activity.

In November, we matched Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in our decision to stay virtually all residential foreclosures until January 31, 2009 in an effort to provide additional outreach to customers who may benefit from loan modification or other workout alternatives.

Our collections specialists perform a detailed analysis and when appropriate assist customers with modifying their payments. We believe that those efforts are working as evidenced by the fact that our re-default rates have thus far been quite low.


As there has been more notoriety concerning the automobile industry, we have seen an increased scrutiny placed on some Michigan banks. We want to emphasize that our exposure to the automobile industry is limited and we have not seen a significant direct impact on our business. Despite the market environment, we have been able to increase our retail deposits. In addition, we are a national mortgage lender and have limited Michigan mortgage exposure. Only 9% of our residential mortgage investment portfolio is in Michigan.


Further, although approximately 55% of our commercial real estate loan portfolio was in Michigan, only 4% of that has automobile-related tenets, which is highlighted on page 22. In the appendix, we provide a variety of additional asset quality metrics both in our residential first mortgage and commercial real estate portfolios.

Now let’s turn to capital. As mentioned earlier, we plan on receiving today a total of $523 million from the U.S. Treasury TARP Program, MP Thrift Investments and Management, of which $474 million will be immediately invested into Flagstar Bank to improve capital levels and to fund additional lending activity. On a pro forma basis, at December 31, 2008 our Tier 1 capital ratio with these investments would have been 8.32% and our risk-based capital ratio would have been 14.78%.

I would like to thank our shareholders to know that our board of directors and management team continues to work hard to navigate through this most challenging environment. We do not take dilution lightly, and we would not have agreed to raise capital under these terms unless we believed that it was in the best interest of shareholders.


As the economy continues to struggle, we believe that this infusion will provide us with both the considerable capital base to sustain future losses and to allow us to prudently increase our asset base and income stream. We believe the MP Thrift Investments will prove to be a knowledgeable investor with a shared vision on the success of Flagstar.

They have acquired a majority investment stake on what our management and even our most respected competitors know to be a great institution with an assembly of some of the industry’s best talents. The transition to working with MP Thrift Investments has thus far been smooth, which forecasts a strong relationship going forward and we look forward to returning Flagstar to profitability and long-term success.

In conjunction with the closing of the investment, Flagstar is changing its constitution of its board of directors so that there will be 11 members on both the Bank Corp. and the bank board of directors. As such, Charles Bazzy, Frank De’Angelo, Richard Elsea, Kirstin Hammond and Robert Rondeau have resigned from the Bank Corp. board of directors, and Charles Bazzy, Richard Elsea, [John Curstan] and [Mary K. Verticelli] have resigned from the bank board of directors. Robert Rondeau will also be resigning as an officer of the bank and the Bank Corp.

New directors for both the Bank Corp and the bank board of directors are [David Maitlin], [Mark Patterson] and [Gregory Ang]. We welcome our new board members. I will remain as Chairman and Kirstin Hammond will continue to serve in her current role as President of Flagstar Capital Markets Corporation and a valued member of the executive management team.

In conclusion, I want to thank the departing board members for their service and dedication to the success of Flagstar over the years. I want to further thank our management team and all the Flagstar employees, including the front line associates who have personal contact with our customers for their confidence, hard work and dedication to this institution. You are the people who will take Flagstar to new levels of achievement. I also want to particularly thank Robert Rondeau for his long and continuous service and wish him the very best in his new endeavor.

With that, let me turn things over to Mark.

Mark Hammond

On page 23 of the presentation, we provide an outlook for 2009 for each of our key drivers. First the driver branch openings, as Tom mentioned for 2009 we intend to only open three new branches all of which are under contract.

Asset growth, we anticipate increasing the balance sheet to between $17 billion and $18.5 billion by the end of 2009. We intend to operate at higher regulatory capital levels than we have in recent years but intend on increasing our balance sheet to put some of the additional capital to work.

Residential mortgage originations, we are raising our prior estimate from a range of $32 billion to $42 billion to arrange a $36 billion to $44 billion. We anticipate our market share will continue to increase as we see significant consolidation and competition exiting the mortgage origination business. The additional capital will allow us increase in production.

Loan sales, in so far as we plan to sell virtually all of our production in 2009, loan sales for 2009 have been increased to match originations to a range of $36 billion to $44 billion.

Net interest margin at the bank level, we are increased on our [inaudible] range of net interest margin for 2009 from a range of 195 basis points to 205 basis points to a new range of 240 basis points to 270 basis points. We anticipate significantly lower funding costs as competitive pressure on deposits have eased and borrowing costs have fallen. Additionally, we anticipate significantly higher spreads on new assets coming on the balance sheet throughout the year.

Gain on sale margin, we are maintaining our estimates for gain on sale margin. Recent gain on loan sale margins have been the highest we’ve seen since 2003 as pricing discipline is returned to the market.

Retail deposit growth, we are raising our 2009 estimate of retail deposits to a range of 5% to 10% from a range of 2% to 6%. Deposit growth has been strong in recent months. If congress makes the $250,000 FDIC insurance a permanent change, we will most likely revise our estimate upwards.

Net loan administration income, we are widening our 2009 estimates for net loan administration income to a range of $60 to $80 million.

Loan charge-offs, we are widening our 2009 guidance on loan charge-offs to a range of $90 million to $150 million. Charge-offs are very difficult to estimate, and are highly dependent on future property depreciation, macroeconomic conditions and potential legislative changes.

Finally, let’s discuss allowances of percentage of loans held for investment. We are raising our estimate to a range of 400 basis points to 500 basis points from a range of 245 basis points to 300 basis points.


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