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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (02-26-09 06:21 AM)

CHIMERA INVESTMENT CORP COMMON STOCK. CEO LAMBIASE MATTHEW bought 100000 shares on 2-17-2009 at $2.92

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

We are a real estate investment trust, or REIT, that invests in residential mortgage loans, residential mortgage-backed securities, or RMBS, real estate-related securities and various other asset classes. We are externally managed by Fixed Income Discount Advisory Company, which we refer to as our Manager or FIDAC. Our Manager is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Annaly Capital Management, Inc., or Annaly, a New York Stock Exchange-listed REIT, which has a long track record of managing investments in U.S. government agency mortgage-backed securities. FIDAC is an investment advisor registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC.

Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors over the long-term, primarily through dividends and secondarily through capital appreciation. We intend to achieve this objective by investing in a broad class of financial assets to construct an investment portfolio that is designed to achieve attractive risk-adjusted returns and that is structured to comply with the various federal income tax requirements for REIT status and to maintain our exclusion from regulation under the Investment Company Act of 1940, or 1940 Act.

We were organized in Maryland on June 1, 2007, and commenced operations on November 21, 2007 following the completion of our initial public offering. In our initial public offering, including the exercise of the underwriters' overallotment option, we sold approximately 34.1 million shares of our common stock at $15.00 per share, and raised proceeds of $479.3 million before offering expenses. Concurrent with our initial public offering, in a private offering we sold Annaly approximately 3.6 million shares of our common stock at $15.00 per share for aggregate net proceeds of approximately $54.3 million.

Our Manager

We are externally managed and advised by FIDAC pursuant to a management agreement. All of our officers are employees of our Manager or one of its affiliates. Our Manager is a fixed-income investment management company specializing in managing investments in U.S. government agency residential mortgage-backed securities, or Agency RMBS, which are mortgage pass-through certificates, collateralized mortgage obligations, or CMOs, and other mortgage-backed securities representing interests in or obligations backed by pools of mortgage loans issued or guaranteed by the Federal National Mortgage Association, or Fannie Mae, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, or Freddie Mac, and the Government National Mortgage Association, or Ginnie Mae. Our Manager also has experience in managing investments in non-Agency RMBS and collateralized debt obligations, or CDOs; real estate-related securities; and managing interest rate-sensitive investment strategies. Our Manager commenced active investment management operations in 1994. At December 31, 2007, our Manager was the adviser or sub-adviser for funds with approximately $3.1 billion in net assets and $15.4 billion in gross assets, predominantly Agency RMBS.

Our Manager is responsible for administering our business activities and day-to-day operations. We have no employees other than our officers. Pursuant to the terms of the management agreement, our Manager provides us with our management team, including our officers, along with appropriate support personnel. Our Manager is at all times subject to the supervision and oversight of our board of directors and has only such functions and authority as we delegate to it.

Our Manager has well-respected and established portfolio management resources for each of our targeted asset classes and a sophisticated infrastructure supporting those resources, including investment professionals focusing on residential mortgage loans, Agency and non-Agency RMBS and other asset-backed securities. We also expect to benefit from our Manager's finance and administration functions, which address legal, compliance, investor relations and operational matters, including portfolio management, trade allocation and execution, securities valuation, risk management and information technologies in connection with the performance of its duties.

We do not pay any of our officers any cash compensation. Rather, we pay our Manager a base management fee and incentive compensation based on performance pursuant to the terms of the management agreement. Our Investment Strategy

Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors over the long-term, primarily through dividends and secondarily through capital appreciation. We intend to seek to achieve this objective by investing in a diversified investment portfolio of residential mortgage loans, real estate-related securities and real estate loans, as well as various other asset classes, subject to maintaining our REIT status and exemption from registration under the 1940 Act. The residential mortgage backed securities, or RMBS, asset backed securities, or ABS, commercial mortgage backed securities, or CMBS, and CDOs we purchase may include investment-grade and non-investment grade classes, including the BB-rated, B-rated and non-rated classes.

We will rely on our Manager's expertise in identifying assets within our target asset classes. We expect that our Manager will make investment decisions based on various factors, including expected cash yield, relative value, risk-adjusted returns, current and projected credit fundamentals, current and projected macroeconomic considerations, current and projected supply and demand, credit and market risk concentration limits, liquidity, cost of financing and financing availability, as well as maintaining our REIT qualification and our exemption from registration under the 1940 Act.

Over time, we will modify our investment allocation strategy as market conditions change to seek to maximize the returns from our investment portfolio. We believe this strategy, combined with our Manager's experience, will enable us to pay dividends and achieve capital appreciation throughout changing interest rate and credit cycles and provide attractive long-term returns to investors.

Since we commenced operations in November 2007, we have focused our investment activities on purchasing residential mortgage loans that have been originated by select high-quality originators, including the retail lending operations of leading commercial banks, and non-Agency RMBS. As the diligence and acquisition lead times for residential mortgage loans are longer than for non-Agency RMBS purchases, our investment portfolio at December 31, 2007 was weighted toward non-Agency RMBS. We expect, however, our investment portfolio to become weighted toward residential mortgage loans over the next three to six months. Our investment decisions, however, will depend on prevailing market conditions and will change over time. As a result, we cannot predict the percentage of our assets that will be invested in each asset class or whether we will invest in other classes of investments. We may change our investment strategy and policies without a vote of our stockholders.

We intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT and to operate our business so as to be exempt from registration under the 1940 Act, and therefore we will be required to invest a substantial majority of our assets in loans secured by mortgages on real estate and real estate-related assets. Subject to maintaining our REIT qualification and our 1940 Act exemption, we do not have any limitations on the amounts we may invest in any of our targeted asset classes.

Investment Portfolio

The following briefly discusses the principal types of investments that we expect to make:

Residential Mortgage Loans

We intend to invest in residential mortgage loans (mortgage loans secured by residential real property) primarily through direct purchases from selected high-quality originators. We intend to enter into mortgage loan purchase agreements with a number of primary mortgage loan originators, including mortgage bankers, commercial banks, savings and loan associations, home builders, credit unions and mortgage conduits. We may also purchase mortgage loans on the secondary market. We expect these loans to be secured primarily by residential properties in the United States.

We intend to invest primarily in residential mortgage loans underwritten to our specifications. The originators will perform the credit review of the borrowers, the appraisal of the properties securing the loan, and maintain other quality control procedures. We expect to generally consider the purchase of loans when the originators have verified the borrowers' income and assets, verified their credit history and obtained appraisals of the properties. We or a third party will perform an independent underwriting review of the processing, underwriting and loan closing methodologies that the originators used in qualifying a borrower for a loan. Depending on the size of the loans, we may not review all of the loans in a pool, but rather select loans for underwriting review based upon specific risk-based criteria such as property location, loan size, effective loan-to-value ratio, borrower's credit score and other criteria we believe to be important indicators of credit risk. Additionally, before the purchase of loans, we will obtain representations and warranties from each originator stating that each loan is underwritten to our requirements or, in the event underwriting exceptions have been made, we are informed so that we may evaluate whether to accept or reject the loans. An originator who breaches these representations and warranties in making a loan that we purchase may be obligated to repurchase the loan from us. As added security, we will use the services of a third-party document custodian to insure the quality and accuracy of all individual mortgage loan closing documents and to hold the documents in safekeeping. As a result, all of the original loan collateral documents that are signed by the borrower, other than the original credit verification documents, are examined, verified and held by the third-party document custodian.

We currently do not intend to originate mortgage loans or provide other types of financing to the owners of real estate. We currently do not intend to establish a loan servicing platform, but expect to retain highly-rated servicers to service our mortgage loan portfolio. We may also purchase certain residential mortgage loans on a servicing-retained basis. In the future, however, we may decide to originate mortgage loans or other types of financing, and we may elect to service mortgage loans and other types of assets.

We expect that all servicers servicing our loans will be highly rated by the rating agencies. We will also conduct a due diligence review of each servicer before executing a servicing agreement. Servicing procedures will typically follow Fannie Mae guidelines but will be specified in each servicing agreement. All servicing agreements will meet standards for inclusion in highly rated mortgage-backed or asset-backed securitizations. We have entered into a master servicing agreement to assist us with management, servicing oversight, and other administrative duties associated with managing our mortgage loans.

We expect that the loans we acquire will be first lien, single-family residential traditional fixed-rate, adjustable-rate and hybrid adjustable-rate loans with original terms to maturity of not more than 40 years and are either fully amortizing or are interest-only for up to 10 years, and fully amortizing thereafter. Fixed-rate mortgage loans bear an interest rate that is fixed for the life of the loan. All adjustable-rate and hybrid adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans will bear an interest rate tied to an interest rate index. Most loans have periodic and lifetime constraints on how much the loan interest rate can change on any predetermined interest rate reset date. The interest rate on each adjustable-rate mortgage loan resets monthly, semi-annually or annually and generally adjusts to a margin over a U.S. Treasury index or the London Interbank Offering Rate, or LIBOR, index. Hybrid adjustable-rate loans have a fixed rate for an initial period, generally 3 to 10 years, and then convert to adjustable-rate loans for their remaining term to maturity.

We will acquire residential mortgage loans for our portfolio with the intention of either securitizing them and retaining them in our portfolio as securitized mortgage loans, or holding them in our residential mortgage loan portfolio. To facilitate the securitization or financing of our loans, we expect to generally create subordinate certificates, which provide a specified amount of credit enhancement. We expect to issue securities through securities underwriters and either retain these securities or finance them in the repurchase agreement market. There is no limit on the amount we may retain of these below-investment-grade subordinate certificates. Until we securitize our residential mortgage loans, we expect to finance our residential mortgage loan portfolio through the use of warehouse facilities and repurchase agreements.

Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities

We intend to invest in RMBS which are typically pass-through certificates created by the securitization of a pool of mortgage loans that are collateralized by residential real estate properties.

The securitization process is governed by one or more of the rating agencies, including Fitch Ratings, Moody's Investors Service and Standard & Poor's, which determine the respective bond class sizes, generally based on a sequential payment structure. Bonds that are rated from AAA to BBB by the rating agencies are considered "investment grade." Bond classes that are subordinate to the BBB class are considered "below-investment grade" or "non-investment grade." The respective bond class sizes are determined based on the review of the underlying collateral by the rating agencies. The payments received from the underlying loans are used to make the payments on the RMBS. Based on the sequential payment priority, the risk of nonpayment for the investment grade RMBS is lower than the risk of nonpayment for the non-investment grade bonds. Accordingly, the investment grade class is typically sold at a lower yield compared to the non-investment grade classes which are sold at higher yields.

We may invest in investment grade and non-investment grade RMBS. We expect to evaluate the credit characteristics of these types of securities, including, but not limited to, loan balance distribution, geographic concentration, property type, occupancy, periodic and lifetime cap, weighted-average loan-to-value and weighted-average FICO score. Qualifying securities will then be analyzed using base line expectations of expected prepayments and losses from given sectors, issuers and the current state of the fixed-income market. Losses and prepayments are stressed simultaneously based on a credit risk-based model. Securities in this portfolio are monitored for variance from expected prepayments, frequencies, severities, losses and cash flow. The due diligence process is particularly important and costly with respect to newly formed originators or issuers because there may be little or no information publicly available about these entities and investments.

We may invest in net interest margin securities, or NIMs, which are notes that are payable from and secured by excess cash flow that is generated by RMBS or home equity line of credit-backed securities, or HELOCs, after paying the debt service, expenses and fees on such securities. The excess cash flow represents all or a portion of a residual that is generally retained by the originator of the RMBS or HELOCs. The residual is illiquid, thus the originator will monetize the position by securitizing the residual and issuing a NIM, usually in the form of a note that is backed by the excess cash flow generated in the underlying securitization.

We may invest in mortgage pass-through certificates issued or guaranteed by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. We refer to these U.S. government agencies as Agencies, and to the mortgage pass-through certificates they issue or guarantee as Agency Mortgage Pass-through Certificates. We may invest in collateralized mortgage obligations issued by the Agencies. We refer to these types of securities as Agency CMOs, and we refer to Agency Mortgage Pass-through Certificates and Agency CMOs as Agency RMBS.

Other Asset-Backed Securities

We intend to invest in securities issued in various CDO offerings to gain exposure to bank loans, corporate bonds, ABS, mortgages, RMBS and CMBS and other instruments. To avoid any actual or perceived conflicts of interest with our Manager, an investment in any such security structured or managed by our Manager will be approved by a majority of our independent directors. To the extent such securities are treated as debt of the CDO issuer for federal income tax purposes, we will hold the securities directly, subject to the requirements of our continued qualification as a REIT. To the extent the securities represent equity interests in a CDO issuer for federal income tax purposes, we may be required to hold such securities through a taxable REIT subsidiary, or TRS, which would cause the income recognized with respect to such securities to be subject to federal (and applicable state and local) corporate income tax. See "Risk Factors - Tax Risks." We could fail to qualify as a REIT or we could become subject to a penalty tax if the income we recognize from certain investments that are treated or could be treated as equity interests in a foreign corporation exceed 5% of our gross income in a taxable year.

In general, CDO issuers are special purpose vehicles that hold a portfolio of income-producing assets financed through the issuance of rated debt securities of different seniority and equity. The debt tranches are typically rated based on cash flow structure, portfolio quality, diversification and credit enhancement. The equity securities issued by the CDO vehicle are the "first loss" piece of the CDO vehicle's capital structure, but they are also generally entitled to all residual amounts available for payment after the CDO vehicle's senior obligations have been satisfied. Some CDO vehicles are "synthetic," in which the credit risk to the collateral pool is transferred to the CDO vehicle by a credit derivative such as a credit default swap.

We also intend to invest in CMBS, which are secured by, or evidence ownership interests in, a single commercial mortgage loan or a pool of mortgage loans secured by commercial properties. These securities may be senior, subordinated, investment grade or non-investment grade. We intend to invest in CMBS that will yield current interest income and where we consider the return of principal to be likely. We intend to acquire CMBS from private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, mortgage bankers, commercial banks, finance companies, investment banks and other entities.

We also intend to invest in consumer ABS. These securities are generally securities for which the underlying collateral consists of assets such as home equity loans, credit card receivables and auto loans. We also expect to invest in non-consumer ABS. These securities are generally secured by loans to businesses and consist of assets such as equipment loans, truck loans and agricultural equipment loans. Issuers of consumer and non-consumer ABS generally are special purpose entities owned or sponsored by banks and finance companies, captive finance subsidiaries of non-financial corporations or specialized originators such as credit card lenders. We may purchase RMBS and ABS which are denominated in foreign currencies or are collateralized by non-U.S.assets.

Investment Guidelines

We have adopted a set of investment guidelines that set out the asset classes, risk tolerance levels, diversification requirements and other criteria used to evaluate the merits of specific investments as well as the overall portfolio composition. Our Manager's Investment Committee reviews our compliance with the investment guidelines periodically and our board of directors receives an investment report at each quarter-end in conjunction with its review of our quarterly results. Our board also reviews our investment portfolio and related compliance with our investment policies and procedures and investment guidelines at each regularly scheduled board of directors meeting.

Our board of directors and our Manager's Investment Committee have adopted the following guidelines for our investments and borrowings:

o No investment shall be made that would cause us to fail to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes;

o No investment shall be made that would cause us to be regulated as an investment company under the 1940 Act;

o With the exception of real estate and housing, no single industry shall represent greater than 20% of the securities or aggregate risk exposure in our portfolio; and o Investments in non-rated or deeply subordinated ABS or other securities that are non-qualifying assets for purposes of the 75% REIT asset test will be limited to an amount not to exceed 50% of our stockholders' equity.

These investment guidelines may be changed by a majority of our board of directors without the approval of our stockholders.

Our board of directors has also adopted a separate set of investment guidelines and procedures to govern our relationships with FIDAC. We have also adopted detailed compliance policies to govern our interaction with FIDAC, including when FIDAC is in receipt of material non-public information.

Our Financing Strategy

We use leverage to increase potential returns to our stockholders. We are not required to maintain any specific debt-to-equity ratio as we believe the appropriate leverage for the particular assets we are financing depends on the credit quality and risk of those assets.

Subject to our maintaining our qualification as a REIT, we expect to use a number of sources to finance our investments, including the following:

o Repurchase Agreements. We intend to finance certain of our assets through the use of repurchase agreements. We anticipate that repurchase agreements will be one of the sources we will use to achieve our desired amount of leverage for our residential real estate assets. We intend to maintain formal relationships with multiple counterparties to obtain financing on favorable terms.

o Warehouse Facilities. We intend to utilize credit facilities for capital needed to fund our assets. We intend to maintain formal relationships with multiple counterparties to maintain warehouse lines on favorable terms.

o Securitization. We will acquire residential mortgage loans for our portfolio with the intention of securitizing them and retaining the securitized mortgage loans in our portfolio. To facilitate the securitization or financing of our loans, we will generally create subordinate certificates, providing a specified amount of credit enhancement, which we intend to retain in our portfolio.

o Asset-Backed Commercial Paper. We may finance certain of our assets using asset-backed commercial paper, or ABCP, conduits, which are bankruptcy-remote special purpose vehicles that issue commercial paper and the proceeds of which are used to fund assets, either through repurchase or secured lending programs. We may utilize ABCP conduits of third parties or create our own conduit.

o Term Financing CDOs. We may finance certain of our assets using term financing strategies, including CDOs and other match-funded financing structures. CDOs are multiple class debt securities, or bonds, secured by pools of assets, such as mortgage-backed securities and corporate debt. Like typical securitization structures, in a CDO:

o the assets are pledged to a trustee for the benefit of the holders of the bonds;
o one or more classes of the bonds are rated by one or more rating agencies; and
o one or more classes of the bonds are marketed to a wide variety of fixed-income investors, which enables the CDO sponsor to achieve a relatively low cost of long-term financing.

Unlike typical securitization structures, the underlying assets may be sold, subject to certain limitations, without a corresponding pay-down of the CDO, provided the proceeds are reinvested in qualifying assets. As a result, CDOs enable the sponsor to actively manage, subject to certain limitations, the pool of assets. We believe CDO financing structures may be an appropriate financing vehicle for our target asset classes because they will enable us to obtain relatively low, long-term cost of funds and minimize the risk that we may have to refinance our liabilities before the maturities of our investments, while giving us the flexibility to manage credit risk and, subject to certain limitations, to take advantage of profit opportunities.

CEO BACKGROUND

MANAGEMENT

The following sets forth certain information with respect to our named executive officers:
Name
Age
Position Held with Us
Matthew Lambiase 41 Chief Executive Officer, President and Director
Christian J. Woschenko 47 Head of Investments
William B. Dyer 61 Head of Underwriting
A. Alexandra Denahan 37 Chief Financial Officer and Secretary



MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

The following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes to those statements included in Item 8 of this Form 10-K. The discussion may contain certain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements are those that are not historical in nature. As a result of many factors, such as those set forth under "Risk Factors" in this 10-K, our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in such forward-looking statements.

Executive Summary

We are a newly-formed specialty finance company that will invest in residential mortgage loans, residential mortgage-backed securities, real estate related securities and various other asset classes. We are externally managed by FIDAC. We intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Our targeted asset classes and the principal investments we expect to make in each are as follows:

o Whole mortgage loans, consisting of:

o Prime mortgage loans

o Jumbo prime mortgage loans

o Alt-A mortgage loans

o RMBS, consisting of:

o Non-Agency RMBS, including investment-grade and non-investment grade classes, including the BB-rated, B-rated and non-rated classes

o Agency RMBS

o ABS, consisting of:

o Debt and equity tranches of CDOs

o CMBS

o Consumer and non-consumer ABS, including investment-grade and non-investment grade classes, including the BB-rated, B-rated and non-rated classes

We completed our initial public offering on November 21, 2007. In that offering and in a concurrent private offering we raised net proceeds before offering expenses of approximately $533.6 million. We have commenced investing these proceeds, and as of December 31, 2007, have a portfolio of RMBS and whole mortgage loans of approximately $1.3 billion.

Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors over the long-term, primarily through dividends and secondarily through capital appreciation. We intend to achieve this objective by investing in a broad class of financial assets to construct an investment portfolio that is designed to achieve attractive risk-adjusted returns and that is structured to comply with the various federal income tax requirements for REIT status.

Our investment strategy is intended to take advantage of opportunities in the current interest rate and credit environment. We will adjust our strategy to changing market conditions by shifting our asset allocations across these various asset classes as interest rate and credit cycles change over time. We believe that our strategy, combined with our Manager's experience, will enable us to pay dividends and achieve capital appreciation throughout changing market cycles. We expect to take a long-term view of assets and liabilities, and our reported earnings and mark-to-market valuations at the end of a financial reporting period will not significantly impact our objective of providing attractive risk-adjusted returns to our stockholders over the long-term.

We use leverage to seek to increase our potential returns and to fund the acquisition of our assets. Our income is generated primarily by the difference, or net spread, between the income we earn on our assets and the cost of our borrowings. We expect to finance our investments using a variety of financing sources including repurchase agreements, warehouse facilities, securitizations, commercial paper and term financing CDOs. We expect to manage our debt by utilizing interest rate hedges, such as interest rate swaps, to reduce the effect of interest rate fluctuations related to our debt.

We expect the results of our operations to be affected by various factors, many of which are beyond our control. Our results of operations will primarily depend on, among other things, the level of our net interest income, the market value of our assets, and the supply of and demand for such assets. Our net interest income, which reflects the amortization of purchase premiums and accretion of discounts, varies primarily as a result of changes in interest rates, borrowing costs, and prepayment speeds, which is a measurement of how quickly borrowers pay down the unpaid principal balance on their mortgage loans.

Prepayment Speeds. Prepayment speeds, as reflected by the Constant Prepayment Rate, or CPR, vary according to interest rates, the type of investment, conditions in financial markets, competition and other factors, none of which can be predicted with any certainty. In general, when interest rates rise, it is relatively less attractive for borrowers to refinance their mortgage loans, and as a result, prepayment speeds tend to decrease. When interest rates fall, prepayment speeds tend to increase. For mortgage loan and RMBS investments purchased at a premium, as prepayment speeds increase, the amount of income we earn decreases because the purchase premium we paid for the bonds amortizes faster than expected. Conversely, decreases in prepayment speeds result in increased income and can extend the period over which we amortize the purchase premium. For mortgage loan and RMBS investments purchased at a discount, as prepayment speeds increase, the amount of income we earn increases because of the acceleration of the accretion of the discount into interest income. Conversely, decreases in prepayment speeds result in decreased income and can extend the period over which we accrete the purchase discount into interest income.

Rising Interest Rate Environment. As indicated above, as interest rates rise, prepayment speeds generally decrease, increasing our interest income. Rising interest rates, however, increase our financing costs which may result in a net negative impact on our net interest income. In addition, if we acquire Agency and non-Agency RMBS collateralized by monthly reset adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, and three- and five-year hybrid ARMs, such interest rate increases should result in decreases in our net investment income, as there could be a timing mismatch between the interest rate reset dates on our RMBS portfolio and the financing costs of these investments. Monthly reset ARMs are ARMs on which coupon rates reset monthly based on indices such as one-month LIBOR. Hybrid ARMs are mortgages that have interest rates that are fixed for an initial period (typically three, five, seven or 10 years) and thereafter reset at regular intervals subject to interest rate caps.

With respect to our floating rate investments such as CDO securities, such interest rate increases should result in increases in our net investment income because our floating rate assets are greater in amount than the related floating rate liabilities. Similarly, such an increase in interest rates should generally result in an increase in our net investment income on fixed-rate investments made by us because our fixed-rate assets would be greater in amount than our fixed-rate liabilities. We expect, however, that our fixed-rate assets would decline in value in a rising interest rate environment and that our net interest spreads on fixed rate assets could decline in a rising interest rate environment to the extent such assets are financed with floating rate debt.

Credit Risk. One of our strategic focuses is on acquiring assets which we believe to be of high credit quality. We believe this strategy will keep our credit losses and financing costs low. We retain the risk of potential credit losses on all of the residential mortgage loans we hold in our portfolio. Additionally, some of our investments in RMBS may be qualifying interests for purposes of maintaining our exemption from the 1940 Act because we retain a 100% ownership interest in the underlying loans. If we purchase all classes of these securitizations, we have the credit exposure on the underlying loans. Prior to the purchase of these securities, we conduct a due diligence process that allows us to remove loans that do not meet our credit standards based on loan-to-value ratios, borrower's credit scores, income and asset documentation and other criteria that we believe to be important indications of credit risk.

Size of Investment Portfolio. The size of our investment portfolio, as measured by the aggregate unpaid principal balance of our mortgage loans and aggregate principal balance of our mortgage related securities and the other assets we own is also a key revenue driver. Generally, as the size of our investment portfolio grows, the amount of interest income we receive increases. The larger investment portfolio, however, drives increased expenses as we incur additional interest expense to finance the purchase of our assets.

Since changes in interest rates may significantly affect our activities, our operating results depend, in large part, upon our ability to effectively manage interest rate risks and prepayment risks while maintaining our status as a REIT.

Current Environment. While the current situation in the sub-prime mortgage sector may provide us opportunities, the current weakness in the broader mortgage market could adversely affect one or more of our potential lenders and could cause one or more of our potential lenders to be unwilling or unable to provide us with financing. In general, this could potentially increase our financing costs and reduce our liquidity. We expect to use a number of sources to finance our investments, including repurchase agreements, warehouse facilities, securitizations, asset-backed commercial paper and term CDOs. Current market conditions have affected the cost and availability of financing from each of these sources--and their individual providers--to different degrees; some sources generally are unavailable, some are available but at a high cost, and some are largely unaffected. For example, in the repurchase agreement market, borrowers have been affected differently depending on the type of security they are financing. Non-Agency RMBS have been harder to finance, depending on the type of assets collateralizing the RMBS. The amount, term and margin requirements associated with these types of financings have been impacted.

Currently, warehouse facilities to finance whole loan prime residential mortgages are generally available from major banks, but at significantly higher cost and greater margin requirements than previously offered. Many major banks that offer warehouse facilities have also reduced the amount of capital available to new entrants and consequently the size of those facilities offered now are smaller than those previously available.

It is currently a challenging market to term finance whole loans through securitization or bonds issued by a CDO structure. The highly rated senior bonds in these securitizations and CDO structures currently have liquidity, but at much wider spreads than issues priced in recent history. The junior subordinate tranches of these structures currently have few buyers and current market conditions have forced issuers to retain these lower rated bonds rather than sell them.

Certain issuers of ABCP have been unable to place (or roll) their securities, which has resulted, in some instances, in forced sales of MBS and other securities which has further negatively impacted the market value of these assets. These market conditions are fluid and likely to change over time. As a result, the execution of our investment strategy may be dictated by the cost and availability of financing from these different sources.

If one or more major market participants fails, it could negatively impact the marketability of all fixed income securities and this could negatively impact the value of the securities we acquire, thus reducing our net book value. Furthermore, if many of our potential lenders are unwilling or unable to provide us with financing, we could be forced to sell our securities or residential mortgage loans at an inopportune time when prices are depressed.

In the current market, it may be difficult or impossible to obtain third party pricing on the investments we purchase. In addition, validating third party pricing for our investments may be more subjective as fewer participants may be willing to provide this service to us. Moreover, the current market is more illiquid than in recent history for some of the investments we purchase. Illiquid investments typically experience greater price volatility as a ready market does not exist. As volatility increases or liquidity decreases we may have greater difficulty financing our investments which may negatively impact our earnings and the execution of our investment strategy.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These accounting principles may require us to make some complex and subjective decisions and assessments. Our most critical accounting policies will involve decisions and assessments that could affect our reported assets and liabilities, as well as our reported revenues and expenses. We believe that all of the decisions and assessments upon which our financial statements will be based will be reasonable at the time made and based upon information available to us at that time. At each quarter end, we obtain independent pricing on all of our assets and perform a verification of those sources to our own internal estimate of fair market value. We have identified what we believe will be our most critical accounting policies to be the following:

Loans Held for Investment

We purchase residential mortgage loans and classify them as loans held for investment on the statement of financial condition. Loans held for investment are intended to be held to maturity and, accordingly, will be reported at the principal amount outstanding, net of provisions for loan losses.

Loan loss provisions will be examined quarterly and updated to reflect expectations of future probable credit losses based on factors such as originator historical losses, geographic concentration, individual loan characteristics, experienced losses, and expectations of future loan pool behavior. As credit losses occur, the provision for loan losses will reflect that realization.

When determine that it is probable that contractually due specific amounts are deemed uncollectable, the loan is considered impaired. To measure our impairment, we determine the fair value of the impaired loan the end of each quarter by using estimates provided by independent dealers in the loans and/or third party pricing services, which use information with respect to transactions in such assets, quotations from dealers, market transactions for comparable assets, various relationships between assets and yield to maturity in determining value. If dealers or the independent pricing services are unable to provide a price for an asset, or if the price provided by them is deemed unreliable by our Manager, then the asset will be valued at its fair value as determined in good faith by our Manager based on its model, utilizing observable inputs. If upon completion of the valuation, the fair value of the loan is less than its net carrying value, an allowance will be created with a corresponding charge to the provision for losses. An allowance for mortgage loans would be maintained at a level believed adequate by management to absorb probable losses. We may elect to sell a loan held for investment due to adverse changes in credit fundamentals. Once the determination has been made by us that we will no longer hold the loan for investment, we will account for the loan at the lower of amortized cost or estimated fair value. The reclassification of the loan and recognition of impairments could adversely affect our reported earnings.

Valuations of Available-for-Sale Securities

We expect our investments in RMBS will be primarily classified as available-for-sale securities that are carried on the statement of financial condition at their fair value. This classification will result in changes in fair values being recorded as statement of financial condition adjustments to accumulated other comprehensive income or loss, which is a component of stockholders' equity.

We expect our available-for-sale securities will have fair values as determined with reference to price estimates provided by independent pricing services and dealers in the securities. We will perform a validation of the estimates provided by third parties to our internal model. If dealers or the independent pricing services are unable to provide a price for an asset, or if the price provided by them is deemed unreliable by our Manager, then the asset will be valued at its fair value as determined in good faith by our Manager. The pricing is subject to various assumptions which could result in different presentations of value.

When the fair value of an available-for-sale security is less than its amortized cost for an extended period, we will consider whether there is an other-than-temporary impairment in the value of the security. If, based on our analysis, an other-than-temporary impairment exists, the cost basis of the security is written down to the then-current fair value, and the unrealized loss is transferred from accumulated other comprehensive loss as an immediate reduction of current earnings (as if the loss had been realized in the period of other-than-temporary impairment). The determination of other-than-temporary impairment is a subjective process, and different judgments and assumptions could affect the timing of loss realization.

We will consider the following factors when determining an other-than-temporary impairment for a security:

o The length of time and the extent to which the market value has been less than the amortized cost;

o Whether the security has been downgraded by a rating agency; and

o Our intent to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in market value.

The determination of other-than-temporary impairment is made at least quarterly. If we determine an impairment to be other than temporary we will realize a loss which will negatively impact current income.

Investment Consolidation

For each investment we make, we will evaluate the underlying entity that issued the securities we will acquire or to which we will make a loan to determine the appropriate accounting. We will refer to guidance in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 140, Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of Liabilities, and FASB Interpretation No. (FIN) 46R, Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, in performing our analysis. FIN 46R addresses the application of Accounting Research Bulletin No. 51, Consolidated Financial Statements, to certain entities in which voting rights are not effective in identifying an investor with a controlling financial interest. In variable interest entities, or VIEs, an entity is subject to consolidation under FIN 46R if the investors either do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support, are unable to direct the entity's activities, or are not exposed to the entity's losses or entitled to its residual returns. VIEs within the scope of FIN 46R are required to be consolidated by their primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary of a VIE is determined to be the party that absorbs a majority of the entity's expected losses, its expected returns, or both. This determination can sometimes involve complex and subjective analysis.

Interest Income Recognition

Interest income on available-for-sale securities and loans held for investment are recognized over the life of the investment using the effective interest method. Interest income on mortgage-backed securities is recognized using the effective interest method as described by SFAS No. 91, Accounting for Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases, for securities of high credit quality and Emerging Issues Task Force No. 99-20, Recognition of Interest Income and Impairment on Purchased and Retained Beneficial Interests in Securitized Financial Assets, for all other securities. Interest income on loans held for investment is recognized based on the contractual terms of the loan instruments. Income recognition will be suspended for loans when, in the opinion of management, a full recovery of income and principal becomes doubtful. Income recognition will be resumed when the loan becomes contractually current and performance is demonstrated to be resumed. Any loan fees or acquisition costs on originated loans or securities will be capitalized and recognized as a component of interest income over the life of the investment using the effective interest method.

Under SFAS No. 91 and Emerging Issues Task Force No. 99-20, management will estimate, at the time of purchase, the future expected cash flows and determine the effective interest rate based on these estimated cash flows and our purchase price. As needed, these estimated cash flows will be updated and a revised yield computed based on the current amortized cost of the investment. In estimating these cash flows, there will be a number of assumptions that will be subject to uncertainties and contingencies. These include the rate and timing of principal payments (including prepayments, repurchases, defaults and liquidations), the pass-through or coupon rate and interest rate fluctuations. In addition, interest payment shortfalls due to delinquencies on the underlying mortgage loans, and the timing of the magnitude of credit losses on the mortgage loans underlying the securities have to be judgmentally estimated. These uncertainties and contingencies are difficult to predict and are subject to future events that may impact management's estimates and our interest income.

Accounting For Derivative Financial Instruments

Our policies permit us to enter into derivative contracts, including interest rate swaps and interest rate caps, as a means of mitigating our interest rate risk. We intend to use interest rate derivative instruments to mitigate interest rate risk rather than to enhance returns.

We account for derivative financial instruments in accordance with SFAS No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, as amended and interpreted. SFAS No. 133 requires an entity to recognize all derivatives as either assets or liabilities in the statement of financial condition and to measure those instruments at fair value. Additionally, the fair value adjustments will affect either other comprehensive income in stockholders' equity until the hedged item is recognized in earnings or net income depending on whether the derivative instrument qualifies as a hedge for accounting purposes and, if so, the nature of the hedging activity.

In the normal course of business, we may use a variety of derivative financial instruments to manage, or hedge, interest rate risk. These derivative financial instruments must be effective in reducing our interest rate risk exposure in order to qualify for hedge accounting. When the terms of an underlying transaction are modified, or when the underlying hedged item ceases to exist, all changes in the fair value of the instrument are marked-to-market with changes in value included in net income for each period until the derivative instrument matures or is settled. Any derivative instrument used for risk management that does not meet the hedging criteria is marked-to-market with the changes in value included in net income.

Derivatives will be used for hedging purposes rather than speculation. We will rely on quotations from a third parties to determine fair values. If our hedging activities do not achieve our desired results, our reported earnings may be adversely affected.

Reserve for Possible Credit Losses

The expense for possible credit losses in connection with debt investments is the charge to earnings to increase the allowance for possible credit losses to the level that management estimates to be adequate considering delinquencies, loss experience and collateral quality. Other factors considered relate to geographic trends and product diversification, the size of the portfolio and current economic conditions. Based upon these factors, we will establish the provision for possible credit losses by category of asset. When it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts contractually due, the account is considered impaired.

Where impairment is indicated, a valuation write-down or write-off is measured based upon the excess of the recorded investment amount over the net fair value of the collateral, as reduced by selling costs. Any deficiency between the carrying amount of an asset and the net sales price of repossessed collateral is charged to the allowance for credit losses.

Income Taxes

We intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT. Accordingly, we will generally not be subject to corporate federal or state income tax to the extent that we make qualifying distributions to our stockholders, and provided we satisfy on a continuing basis, through actual investment and operating results, the REIT requirements including certain asset, income, distribution and stock ownership tests. If we fail to qualify as a REIT, and do not qualify for certain statutory relief provisions, we will be subject to federal, state and local income taxes and may be precluded from qualifying as a REIT for the subsequent four taxable years following the year in which we lost our REIT qualification. Accordingly, our failure to qualify as a REIT could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and amounts available for distribution to our stockholders.

The dividends paid deduction of a REIT for qualifying dividends to its stockholders is computed using our taxable income as opposed to net income reported on the financial statements. Taxable income, generally, will differ from net income reported on the financial statements because the determination of taxable income is based on tax provisions and not financial accounting principles.

We may elect to treat certain of our subsidiaries as TRSs. In general, a TRS of ours may hold assets and engage in activities that we cannot hold or engage in directly and generally may engage in any real estate or non-real estate-related business. A TRS is subject to federal, state and local corporate income taxes.

While our TRS will generate net income, our TRS can declare dividends to us which will be included in our taxable income and necessitate a distribution to our stockholders. Conversely, if we retain earnings at the TRS level, no distribution is required and we can increase book equity of the consolidated entity.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, or SFAS 157. SFAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and requires enhanced disclosures about fair value measurements. SFAS 157 requires companies to disclose the fair value of their financial instruments according to a fair value hierarchy (i.e., levels 1, 2, and 3, as defined). Additionally, companies are required to provide enhanced disclosure regarding instruments in the level 3 category (which require significant management judgment), including a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances separately for each major category of assets and liabilities. We do not believe that the adoption of SFAS 157 will have a significant impact on the manner in which we estimate fair value, but expect that adoption will increase footnote disclosure to comply with SFAS 157 disclosure requirements for financial statements issued after January 1, 2008.

In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, or SFAS 159 Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115. SFAS 159 permits entities to choose to measure many financial instruments and certain other items at fair value. Unrealized gains and losses on items for which the fair value option has been elected will be recognized in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. SFAS 159 became effective for the Company January 1, 2008. The Company did not elect the fair value option for any existing eligible financial instruments.

In February 2008, FASB issued FASB Staff Position No. FAS 140-3 Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets and Repurchase Financing Transactions, or FSP FAS 140-3. FSP FAS 140-3 addresses whether transactions where assets purchased from a particular counterparty and financed through a repurchase agreement with the same counterparty can be considered and accounted for as separate transactions, or are required to be considered "linked" transactions and may be considered derivatives under SFAS No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, or SFAS 133. FSP FAS 140-3 requires purchases and subsequent financing through repurchase agreements be considered linked transactions unless all of the following conditions apply: (1) the initial purchase and the use of repurchase agreements to finance the purchase are not contractually contingent upon each other; (2) the repurchase financing entered into between the parties provides full recourse to the transferee and the repurchase price is fixed; (3) the financial assets is readily obtainable in the market; and (4) the financial instrument and the repurchase agreement are not coterminous. This FSP is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2008. We are currently evaluating FSP FAS 140-3 but does not expect its application to have a significant impact on its financial reporting.

Financial Condition

All of our assets at December 31, 2007 were acquired with the net proceeds of our initial public offering and concurrent private offering which were consummated in November 2007, and our use of leverage. At December 31, 2007, our portfolio consisted of $1.1 billion of RMBS and of approximately $162 million of whole mortgage loans.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

We make forward-looking statements in this report that are subject to risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements include information about possible or assumed future results of our business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations, plans and objectives. When we use the words "believe," "expect," "anticipate," "estimate," "plan," "continue," "intend," "should," "may," "would," "will" or similar expressions, we intend to identify forward-looking statements. Statements regarding the following subjects, among others, are forward-looking by their nature:

o our business and investment strategy;

o our projected financial and operating results;

o our ability to maintain existing financing arrangements, obtain future financing arrangements and the terms of such arrangements;

o general volatility of the securities markets in which we invest;

o our expected investments;

o changes in the value of our investments;

o interest rate mismatches between our mortgage-backed securities and our borrowings used to fund such purchases;

o changes in interest rates and mortgage prepayment rates;

o effects of interest rate caps on our adjustable-rate mortgage-backed securities;

o rates of default or decreased recovery rates on our investments;

o prepayments of the mortgage and other loans underlying our mortgage-backed or other asset-backed securities;

o the degree to which our hedging strategies may or may not protect us from interest rate volatility;

o impact of and changes in governmental regulations, tax law and rates, accounting guidance, and similar matters;

o availability of investment opportunities in real estate-related and other securities;

o availability of qualified personnel;

o estimates relating to our ability to make distributions to our stockholders in the future;

o our understanding of our competition; and market trends in our industry, interest rates, the debt securities markets or the general economy.

The forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of our future performance, taking into account all information currently available to us. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. These beliefs, assumptions and expectations can change as a result of many possible events or factors, not all of which are known to us. Some of these factors are described under the caption "Risk Factors" in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and any subsequent Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. If a change occurs, our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations may vary materially from those expressed in our forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made. New risks and uncertainties arise from time to time, and it is impossible for us to predict those events or how they may affect us. Except as required by law, we are not obligated to, and do not intend to, update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Executive Summary

We are a specialty finance company that invests in residential mortgage loans, residential mortgage-backed securities, real estate related securities and various other asset classes. We are externally managed by FIDAC. We have elected and intend to qualify to be taxed as a REIT for federal income tax purposes commencing with our taxable year ending on December 31, 2007. Our targeted asset classes and the principal investments we expect to make in each are as follows:

o RMBS, consisting of:

o Non-Agency RMBS, including investment-grade and non-investment grade classes, including the BB-rated, B-rated and non-rated classes

o Agency RMBS

o Whole mortgage loans, consisting of:

o Prime mortgage loans

o Jumbo prime mortgage loans

o Alt-A mortgage loans

o Asset Backed Securities, or ABS, consisting of:

o CMBS

o Debt and equity tranches of CDOs

o Consumer and non-consumer ABS, including investment-grade and non-investment grade classes, including the BB-rated, B-rated and non-rated classes

We completed our initial public offering on November 21, 2007. In that offering and in a concurrent private offering we raised net proceeds before offering expenses of approximately $533.6 million. We completed a second public offering and second private offering on October 29, 2008. In these offerings we raised proceeds before offering expenses of approximately $309.6 million and we are commencing investing these proceeds.

Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors over the long-term, primarily through dividends and secondarily through capital appreciation. We intend to achieve this objective by investing in a broad class of financial assets to construct an investment portfolio that is designed to achieve attractive risk-adjusted returns and that is structured to comply with the various federal income tax requirements for REIT status. We expect that over the near term our investment portfolio will continue to be weighted toward non-Agency RMBS, subject to maintaining our REIT qualification and our 1940 Act exemption, which may, depending on the composition of our investment portfolio, require us to purchase Agency RMBS or other qualifying assets. Over time we expect that our investment portfolio will become more weighted toward residential mortgage loans.

Our investment strategy is intended to take advantage of opportunities in the current interest rate and credit environment. We will adjust our strategy to changing market conditions by shifting our asset allocations across these various asset classes as interest rate and credit cycles change over time. We believe that our strategy, combined with FIDAC's experience, will enable us to pay dividends and achieve capital appreciation throughout changing market cycles. We expect to take a long-term view of assets and liabilities, and our reported earnings and mark-to-market valuations at the end of a financial reporting period will not significantly impact our objective of providing attractive risk-adjusted returns to our stockholders over the long-term.

We use leverage to seek to increase our potential returns and to fund the acquisition of our assets. Our income is generated primarily by the difference, or net spread, between the income we earn on our assets and the cost of our borrowings. We expect to finance our investments using a variety of financing sources including repurchase agreements, warehouse facilities, securitizations, commercial paper and term financing CDOs. We may manage our debt by utilizing interest rate hedges, such as interest rate swaps, to reduce the effect of interest rate fluctuations related to our debt.

Recent Developments

We commenced operations in November 2007 in the midst of challenging market conditions which affected the cost and availability of financing from the facilities with which we expected to finance our investments. These instruments included repurchase agreements, warehouse facilities, securitizations, asset-backed commercial paper, or ABCP, and term CDOs. The liquidity crisis which commenced in August 2007 affected each of these sources--and their individual providers--to different degrees; some sources generally became unavailable, some remained available but at a high cost, and some were largely unaffected. For example, in the repurchase agreement market, non-Agency RMBS became harder to finance, depending on the type of assets collateralizing the RMBS. The amount, term and margin requirements associated with these types of financings were also impacted. At that time, warehouse facilities to finance whole loan prime residential mortgages were generally available from major banks, but at significantly higher cost and had greater margin requirements than previously offered. It was also extremely difficult to term finance whole loans through securitization or bonds issued by a CDO structure. Financing using ABCP froze as issuers became unable to place (or roll) their securities, which resulted, in some instances, in forced sales of mortgage-backed securities, or MBS, and other securities which further negatively impacted the market value of these assets.

Although the credit markets had been undergoing much turbulence, as we started ramping up our portfolio, we noted a slight easing. We entered into a number of repurchase agreements we could use to finance RMBS. In January 2008, we entered into two whole mortgage loan repurchase agreements. As we began to see the availability of financing, we were also seeing better underwriting standards used to originate new mortgages. We commenced buying and financing RMBS and also entered into agreements to purchase whole mortgage loans. We purchased high credit quality assets which we believed we would be readily able to finance.

Beginning in mid-February 2008, credit markets experienced a dramatic and sudden adverse change. The severity of the limitation on liquidity was largely unanticipated by the markets. Credit once again froze, and in the mortgage market, valuations of non-Agency RMBS and whole mortgage loans came under severe pressure. This credit crisis began in early February 2008, when a heavily leveraged investor announced that it had to de-lever and liquidate a portfolio of approximately $30 billion of non-Agency RMBS. Prices of these types of securities dropped dramatically, and lenders started lowering the prices on non-Agency RMBS that they held as collateral to secure the loans they had extended. The subsequent failure in March 2008 of a major investment bank worsened the crisis. During the past nine months, due to the deterioration in the market value of our assets, we received and met margin calls under our repurchase agreements, which resulted in our obtaining additional funding from third parties, including from Annaly, and taking other steps to increase our liquidity. Additionally, the disruptions during the six months ended June 30, 2008 resulted in us not being in compliance with the net income covenant in one of our whole loan repurchase agreements and the liquidity covenants in our other whole loan repurchase agreement at a time during which we had no amounts outstanding under those facilities. We amended these covenants, and on July 29, 2008, we terminated those facilities to avoid paying non-usage fees. Although we made no asset sales during the quarter ended June 30, 2008, for the third quarter of 2008, we sold assets with a carrying value of $432.6 million in AAA-rated non-Agency RMBS for a loss of approximately $113.1 million, which includes a realized loss of $11.6 million related to the August 28, 2008 transaction described below, and terminated $983.4 million in notional interest rate swaps for a loss of approximately $10.5 million, which together resulted in a net realized loss of approximately $123.6 million.

The challenges of the first quarter of 2008 have continued into the second and third quarters, as financing difficulties have severely pressured liquidity and asset values. In September 2008, Lehman Brothers Holdings, Inc., a major investment bank, experienced a major liquidity crisis and failed. Securities trading remains limited and mortgage securities financing markets remain challenging as the industry continues to report negative news. This dislocation in the non-Agency mortgage sector has made it difficult for us to obtain short-term financing on favorable terms. As a result, we have completed loan securitizations in order to obtain long-term financing and terminated our un-utilized whole loan repurchase agreements in order to avoid paying non-usage fees under those agreements. In addition, we have continued to seek funding from Annaly. Under these circumstances, we expect to take actions intended to protect our liquidity, which may include reducing borrowings and disposing of assets as well as raising capital as we recently did. As a result, we expect to operate with a low level of leverage and to continue to take actions that would support available cash.

During this period of market dislocation, fiscal and monetary policymakers have established new liquidity facilities for primary dealers and commercial banks, reduced short-term interest rates, and passed legislation that is intended to address the challenges of mortgage borrowers and lenders. This legislation, the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008, seeks to forestall home foreclosures for distressed borrowers and assist communities with foreclosure problems. Although these aggressive steps are intended to protect and support the US housing and mortgage market, we continue to operate under very difficult market conditions.

Since June 30, 2008, there have been increased market concerns about Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae's ability to withstand future credit losses associated with securities held in their investment portfolios, and on which they provide guarantees, without the direct support of the federal government. Recently, the government passed the "Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008." Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have recently been placed into the conservatorship of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, or FHFA, their federal regulator, pursuant to its powers under The Federal Housing Finance Regulatory Reform Act of 2008, a part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. As the conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the FHFA controls and directs the operations of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and may (1) take over the assets of and operate Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac with all the powers of the shareholders, the directors, and the officers of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and conduct all business of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; (2) collect all obligations and money due to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; (3) perform all functions of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac which are consistent with the conservator's appointment; (4) preserve and conserve the assets and property of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac; and
(5) contract for assistance in fulfilling any function, activity, action or duty of the conservator.

In addition to FHFA becoming the conservator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, (i) the U.S. Department of Treasury and FHFA have entered into preferred stock purchase agreements between the U.S. Department of Treasury and Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac pursuant to which the U.S. Department of Treasury will ensure that each of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac maintains a positive net worth; (ii) the U.S. Department of Treasury has established a new secured lending credit facility which will be available to Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Home Loan Banks, which is intended to serve as a liquidity backstop, which will be available until December 2009; and (iii) the U.S. Department of Treasury has initiated a temporary program to purchase RMBS issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Given the highly fluid and evolving nature of these events, it is unclear how our business will be impacted. Based upon the further activity of the U.S. government or market response to developments at Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, our business could be adversely impacted.

The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, or EESA, was recently enacted. The EESA provides the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury with the authority to establish a Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, to purchase from financial institutions up to $700 billion of residential or commercial mortgages and any securities, obligations, or other instruments that are based on or related to such mortgages, that in each case was originated or issued on or before March 14, 2008, as well as any other financial instrument that the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, after consultation with the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, determines the purchase of which is necessary to promote financial market stability, upon transmittal of such determination, in writing, to the appropriate committees of the U.S. Congress. The EESA also provides for a program that would allow companies to insure their troubled assets.

There can be no assurance that the EESA will have a beneficial impact on the financial markets, including current extreme levels of volatility. To the extent the market does not respond favorably to the TARP or the TARP does not function as intended, our business may not receive the anticipated positive impact from the legislation. In addition, the U.S. Government, Federal Reserve and other governmental and regulatory bodies have taken or are considering taking other actions to address the financial crisis. We cannot predict whether or when such actions may occur or what impact, if any, such actions could have on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

On July 25, 2008, we sponsored a $151.2 million securitization whereby we securitized our then-current inventory of mortgage loans. In this transaction, we retained all of the securities issued by the securitization trust including approximately $142.4 million of AAA-rated fixed and floating rate senior bonds and $8.8 million in subordinated bonds. This transaction will be accounted for as a sale. On August 28, 2008, we sold approximately $74.9 million of the AAA-rated fixed and floating rate bonds related to the July 25, 2008 securitization to third-party investors and realized a loss of $11.6 million.

On September 9, 2008, we declared the third quarter 2008 common stock cash dividend of $0.16 per share of our common stock. This dividend is payable October 31, 2008 to common shareholders of record on September 18, 2008.

In October 2008, we and FIDAC amended our management agreement to reduce the base management fee from 1.75% per annum to 1.50% per annum of our stockholders' equity and eliminate the incentive fees previously provided for in the management agreement.

Trends

We expect the results of our operations to be affected by various factors, many of which are beyond our control. Our results of operations will primarily depend on, among other things, the level of our net interest income, the market value of our assets, and the supply of and demand for such assets. Our net interest income, which reflects the amortization of purchase premiums and accretion of discounts, varies primarily as a result of changes in interest rates, borrowing costs, and prepayment speeds, which is a measurement of how quickly borrowers pay down the unpaid principal balance on their mortgage loans.

Prepayment Speeds. Prepayment speeds, as reflected by the Constant Prepayment Rate, or CPR, vary according to interest rates, the type of investment, conditions in financial markets, competition and other factors, none of which can be predicted with any certainty. In general, when interest rates rise, it is relatively less attractive for borrowers to refinance their mortgage loans, and as a result, prepayment speeds tend to decrease. When interest rates fall, prepayment speeds tend to increase. For mortgage loan and RMBS investments purchased at a premium, as prepayment speeds increase, the amount of income we earn decreases because the purchase premium we paid for the bonds amortizes faster than expected. Conversely, decreases in prepayment speeds result in increased income and can extend the period over which we amortize the purchase premium. For mortgage loan and RMBS investments purchased at a discount, as prepayment speeds increase, the amount of income we earn increases because of the acceleration of the accretion of the discount into interest income. Conversely, decreases in prepayment speeds result in decreased income and can extend the period over which we accrete the purchase discount into interest income.

Rising Interest Rate Environment. As indicated above, as interest rates rise, prepayment speeds generally decrease, increasing our net interest income. Rising interest rates, however, increase our financing costs which may result in a net negative impact on our net interest income. In addition, if we acquire Agency and non-Agency RMBS collateralized by monthly reset adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, and three- and five-year hybrid ARMs, such interest rate increases could result in decreases in our net investment income, as there could be a timing mismatch between the interest rate reset dates on our RMBS portfolio and the financing costs of these investments. Monthly reset ARMs are ARMs on which coupon rates reset monthly based on indices such as the one-month London Interbank Offering Rate, or LIBOR. Hybrid ARMs are mortgages that have interest rates that are fixed for an initial period (typically three, five, seven or ten years) and thereafter reset at regular intervals subject to interest rate caps.

With respect to our floating rate investments, such interest rate increases should result in increases in our net investment income because our floating rate assets are greater in amount than the related floating rate liabilities. Similarly, such an increase in interest rates should generally result in an increase in our net investment income on fixed-rate investments made by us because our fixed-rate assets would be greater in amount than our fixed-rate liabilities. We expect, however, that our fixed-rate assets would decline in value in a rising interest rate environment and that our net interest spreads on fixed rate assets could decline in a rising interest rate environment to the extent such assets are financed with floating rate debt.

Falling Interest Rate Environment. As interest rates fall, prepayment speeds generally increase, decreasing our net interest income. Falling interest rates, however, decrease our financing costs which may result in a net positive impact on our net interest income. In addition, if we acquire Agency and non-Agency RMBS collateralized by monthly reset adjustable-rate mortgages, or ARMs, and three- and five-year hybrid ARMs, such interest rate decreases could result in increases in our net investment income, as there could be a timing mismatch between the interest rate reset dates on our RMBS portfolio and the financing costs of these investments. Monthly reset ARMs are ARMs on which coupon rates reset monthly based on indices such as the one-month London Interbank Offering Rate, or LIBOR. Hybrid ARMs are mortgages that have interest rates that are fixed for an initial period (typically three, five, seven or ten years) and thereafter reset at regular intervals subject to interest rate caps.

With respect to our floating rate investments, such interest rate decreases may result in decreases in our net investment income because our floating rate assets may be greater in amount than the related floating rate liabilities. Similarly, such an decrease in interest rates should generally result in an increase in our net investment income on fixed-rate investments made by us because our fixed-rate assets would be greater in amount than our fixed-rate liabilities. We expect, however, that our fixed-rate assets would increase in value in a falling interest rate environment and that our net interest spreads on fixed rate assets could increase in a falling interest rate environment to the extent such assets are financed with floating rate debt.

Credit Risk. One of our strategic focuses is acquiring assets which we believe to be of high credit quality. We believe this strategy will generally keep our credit losses and financing costs low. We retain the risk of potential credit losses on all of the residential mortgage loans we hold in our portfolio. Additionally, some of our investments in RMBS may be qualifying interests for purposes of maintaining our exemption from the 1940 Act because we retain a 100% ownership interest in the underlying loans. If we purchase all classes of these securitizations, we have the credit exposure on the underlying loans. Prior to the purchase of these securities, we conduct a due diligence process that allows us to remove loans that do not meet our credit standards based on loan-to-value ratios, borrowers' credit scores, income and asset documentation and other criteria that we believe to be important indications of credit risk.

Size of Investment Portfolio. The size of our investment portfolio, as measured by the aggregate unpaid principal balance of our mortgage loans and aggregate principal balance of our mortgage related securities and the other assets we own is also a key revenue driver. Generally, as the size of our investment portfolio grows, the amount of interest income we receive increases. The larger investment portfolio, however, drives increased expenses as we incur additional interest expense to finance the purchase of our assets.

Since changes in interest rates may significantly affect our activities, our operating results depend, in large part, upon our ability to effectively manage interest rate risks and prepayment risks while maintaining our status as a REIT.

Current Environment. The current weakness in the broader mortgage markets could adversely affect one or more of our potential lenders or any of our lenders and could cause one or more of our potential lenders or any of our lenders to be unwilling or unable to provide us with financing or require us to post additional collateral. In general, this could potentially increase our financing costs and reduce our liquidity or require us to sell assets at an inopportune time. We expect to use a number of sources to finance our investments, including repurchase agreements, warehouse facilities, securitizations, asset-backed commercial paper and term CDOs. Current market conditions have affected the cost and availability of financing from each of these sources and their individual providers to different degrees; some sources generally are unavailable, some are available but at a high cost, and some are largely unaffected. For example, in the repurchase agreement market, borrowers have been affected differently depending on the type of security they are financing. Non-Agency RMBS have been harder to finance, depending on the type of assets collateralizing the RMBS. The amount, term and margin requirements associated with these types of financings have been negatively impacted.

Currently, warehouse facilities to finance whole loan prime residential mortgages are generally available from major banks, but at significantly higher cost and have greater margin requirements than previously offered. Many major banks that offer warehouse facilities have also reduced the amount of capital available to new entrants and consequently the size of those facilities offered now are smaller than those previously available. We decided to terminate our two whole loan repurchase agreements in order to avoid paying non-usage fees under those agreements.

It is currently a challenging market to term finance whole loans through securitization or bonds issued by a CDO structure. The highly rated senior bonds in these securitizations and CDO structures currently have liquidity, but at much wider spreads than issues priced in recent history. The junior subordinate tranches of these structures currently have few buyers and current market conditions have forced issuers to retain these lower rated bonds rather than sell them.

Certain issuers of ABCP have been unable to place (or roll) their securities, which has resulted, in some instances, in forced sales of MBS and other securities which has further negatively impacted the market value of these assets. These market conditions are fluid and likely to change over time. As a result, the execution of our investment strategy may be dictated by the cost and availability of financing from these different sources.

If one or more major market participants fails or otherwise experiences a major liquidity crisis, as was the case for Bear Stearns & Co. in March 2008, and Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. in September 2008, it could negatively impact the marketability of all fixed income securities and this could negatively impact the value of the securities we acquire, thus reducing our net book value. Furthermore, if many of our potential lenders or any of our lenders are unwilling or unable to provide us with financing, we could be forced to sell our securities or residential mortgage loans at an inopportune time when prices are depressed. For example, for the quarter ended March 31, 2008, we sold assets with a carrying value of $394.2 million for an aggregate loss of $32.8 million. While we did not sell any assets during the quarter ended June 30, 2008, for the third quarter of 2008, we sold assets with a carrying value of $432.6 million in AAA-rated non-Agency RMBS for a loss of approximately $113.1 million and terminated $983.4 million in notional interest rate swaps for a loss of approximately $10.5 million, which together resulted in a net realized loss of approximately $123.6 million.

As described above, there has been significant government action in the capital markets. However, there can be no assurance that the government's actions with respect to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, the EESA, or the TARP will have a beneficial impact on the financial markets, including current extreme levels of volatility. To the extent the market does not respond favorably to these actions, or these actions do not function as intended, our business may not receive the anticipated positive impact from them. In addition, the U.S. Government, Federal Reserve and other governmental and regulatory bodies have taken or are considering taking other actions to address the financial crisis. We cannot predict whether or when such actions may occur or what impact, if any, such actions could have on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In the current market, it may be difficult or impossible to obtain third party pricing on the investments we purchase. In addition, validating third party pricing for our investments may be more subjective as fewer participants may be willing to provide this service to us. Moreover, the current market is more illiquid than in recent history for some of the investments we purchase. Illiquid investments typically experience greater price volatility as a ready market does not exist. As volatility increases or liquidity decreases we may have greater difficulty financing our investments which may negatively impact our earnings and the execution of our investment strategy.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These accounting principles may require us to make some complex and subjective decisions and assessments. Our most critical accounting policies will involve decisions and assessments that could affect our reported assets and liabilities, as well as our reported revenues and expenses. We believe that all of the decisions and assessments upon which our financial statements are based will be reasonable at the time made and based upon information available to us at that time. At each quarter end, we calculate estimated fair value using a pricing model. We validate our pricing model by obtaining independent pricing on all of our assets and performing a verification of those sources to our own internal estimate of fair value. We have identified what we believe will be our most critical accounting policies to be the following:

Valuation of Investments

On January 1, 2008, we adopted SFAS 157, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value, and establishes a three-level valuation hierarchy for disclosure of fair value measurement and enhances disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. The valuation hierarchy is based upon the transparency of inputs to the valuation of an asset or liability as of the measurement date. The three levels are defined as follow:

Level 1 - valuation based on quoted prices for identical assets in active markets.

Level 2 - valuation based on one or more quoted prices in markets that are not active or for which all significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3 - inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable and significant to overall fair value.

Mortgage-Backed Securities and interest rate swaps are valued using a pricing model. The MBS pricing model incorporates such factors as coupons, prepayment speeds, spread to the Treasury and swap curves, convexity, duration, periodic and life caps, and credit enhancement. Interest rate swaps are modeled by incorporating such factors as the Treasury curve, LIBOR rates, and the receive rate on the interest rate swaps. Management reviews the fair values determined by the pricing model and compares its results to dealer quotes received on each investment to validate the reasonableness of the valuations indicated by the pricing models. The dealer quotes will incorporate common market pricing methods, including a spread measurement to the Treasury curve or interest rate swap curve as well as underlying characteristics of the particular security including coupon, periodic and life caps, rate reset period, issuer, additional credit support and expected life of the security.

As fair value is not an entity specific measure and is a market based approach which considers the value of an asset or liability from the perspective of a market participant, observability of prices and inputs can vary significantly from period to period. During times of market dislocation, as has been experienced during the recent months, the observability of prices and inputs can be reduced for certain instruments. A condition such as this can cause instruments to be reclassified from level 1 to level 2 or level 2 to level
3. At September 30, 2008 we held $5.2 million of investments we classify as Level 3; the remainder of our investments are classified as Level 2.

Loans Held for Investment and Securitized Loans Held to Maturity

We purchase residential mortgage loans and classify them as loans held for investment or Securitized loans held to maturity on the statement of financial condition. These investments are intended to be held to maturity and, accordingly, are reported at the principal amount outstanding, net of provisions for loan losses.

Loan loss provisions are examined quarterly and updated to reflect expectations of future probable credit losses based on factors such as originator historical losses, geographic concentration, individual loan characteristics, experienced losses, and expectations of future loan pool behavior. As credit losses occur, the provision for loan losses will reflect that realization.

When we determine that it is probable that contractually due specific amounts are deemed uncollectable, the loan is considered impaired. To measure our impairment we determine the excess of the recorded investment amount over the net fair value of the collateral, as reduced by selling costs. Any deficiency between the carrying amount of an asset and the net sales price of repossessed collateral is charged to the allowance for loan losses.

An allowance for mortgage loans is maintained at a level believed adequate by management to absorb probable losses. We may elect to sell a loan held for investment due to adverse changes in credit fundamentals. Once the determination has been made by us that we will no longer hold the loan for investment, we will account for the loan at the lower of amortized cost or estimated fair value. The reclassification of the loan and recognition of impairments could adversely affect our reported earnings.

Valuations of Available-for-Sale Securities

We expect our investments in RMBS will be primarily classified as available-for-sale securities that are carried on the statement of financial condition at their fair value. This classification will result in changes in fair values being recorded as statement of financial condition adjustments to accumulated other comprehensive income or loss, which is a component of stockholders' equity.

Our available-for-sale securities have fair values as determined with reference to fair values calculated using a pricing model. Management reviews the fair values generated to insure prices are reflective of the current market. We perform a validation of the fair value calculated by the pricing model by comparing its results to independent prices provided by dealers in the securities and/or third party pricing services. If dealers or independent pricing services are unable to provide a price for an asset, or if the price provided by them is deemed unreliable by FIDAC, then the asset will be valued at its fair value as determined in good faith by FIDAC. The pricing is subject to various assumptions which could result in different presentations of value.

When the fair value of an available-for-sale security is less than its amortized cost for an extended period or there is a significant decline in value, we consider whether there is an other-than-temporary impairment in the value of the security. If, based on our analysis, an other-than-temporary impairment exists, the cost basis of the security is written down to the then-current fair value, and the unrealized loss is transferred from accumulated other comprehensive loss as an immediate reduction of current earnings (as if the loss had been realized in the period of other-than-temporary impairment). The determination of other-than-temporary impairment is a subjective process, and different judgments and assumptions could affect the timing of loss realization.

We consider the following factors when determining an other-than-temporary impairment for a security:

o The length of time and the extent to which the market value has been less than the amortized cost;

o Whether the security has been downgraded by a rating agency; and

o Our intent to hold the security for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in market value.

The determination of other-than-temporary impairment is made at least quarterly. If we determine an impairment to be other than temporary we will realize a loss which will negatively impact current income.

Investment Consolidation

For each investment we make, we will evaluate the underlying entity that issued the securities we will acquire or to which we will make a loan to determine the appropriate accounting. In performing our analysis, we refer to guidance in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 140, Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of Liabilities, and FASB Interpretation No. (FIN) 46R, Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities. FIN 46R addresses the application of Accounting Research Bulletin No. 51, Consolidated Financial Statements, to certain entities in which voting rights are not effective in identifying an investor with a controlling financial interest. In variable interest entities, or VIEs, an entity is subject to consolidation under FIN 46R if the investors either do not have sufficient equity at risk for the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated financial support, are unable to direct the entity's activities, or are not exposed to the entity's losses or entitled to its residual returns. VIEs within the scope of FIN 46R are required to be consolidated by their primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary of a VIE is determined to be the party that absorbs a majority of the entity's expected losses, its expected returns, or both. This determination can sometimes involve complex and subjective analyses.

CONF CALL

Matthew Lambiase

Thank you, Beatrice. Good morning, and welcome to the fourth quarter earnings call for Chimera Investment Corporation. I’m Matt Lambiase, the CEO and president of Chimera.

And joining me on the call today are members of our senior management team, our CFO, Alex Denahan; our Head of Chief of Investments, Chris Woschenko; our Head of Underwriting, Bill Dyer; and also joining me today are Wellington Denahan-Norris, the Chief Investment Officer for FIDAC; and Jay Diamond, Managing Director of FIDAC and a director of Chimera.

We are here today to review the results for the fourth quarter of 2008 and answer any questions that you may have, and before we take your questions, I’ll make a few general comment and have Alex review the quarter. For far too many, 2008 will not have passed fast enough. It was a year of tremendous asset volatility topped up with massive governmental capital injections into the banking system. Chimera took its lumps through the period but emerged on solid footing.

Despite the difficult environment, or perhaps more accurately because of it, the company successfully raised new equity in late October. Management disclosed and executed on a defensive strategy to invest the new capital into Agency MBS on an unlevered basis and slowly ramp non-agency asset purchases. We thought the market would have another wave of volatility and we waited to see more clarity on number of fronts; turned out to be a wise decision.

In November, Treasury announced that they were not going to use the newly created TARP program to buy mortgage assets as previously anticipated by the market, and in December several large banks came under pressure, both of which contributed to increased price volatility in the last half of the quarter.

To make matters more interesting, subsequent to year-end, new bankruptcy mortgage cram-down legislation is being contemplated in Washington, and has once again added uncertainty to the market. Chimera, like other participants, is waiting to see the complete language of the legislation. Nonetheless, there are aspects of the market that may benefit from legislative changes.

The US government is expending extraordinary effort to add liquidity to the housing market. Some efforts such as the FDIC Bond Guarantee Program have started to thaw out parts of the non-Agency MBS markets. Banks who issue these guaranteed bonds are using the proceeds to fund their consumer lending, and in doing so freeing up cash flow that can now be directed towards the secondary markets.

So far this year, we’ve seen a much more pronounced bid from banks in the prime MBS market and prices have increased accordingly. The rising market prices for prime jumbo secondary MBS that we’ve seen so far this year may be the first stage of a recovery that’ll make credit available once again to jumbo borrowers and help stabilize home prices.

We remain both cautious and optimistic as we look forward. Markets generally tend to overreact on the downside in these circumstances. Our capital resources and our talented team are busily evaluating opportunities, but we have been selective in our commitment to the market in the current environment. And the bottom line is we are confident that our patient deployment of capital will benefit the portfolio in future quarters and for years to come.

With that, I’ll turn it over to Alex.

Alex Denahan

Chimera reported Core Earnings for the quarter ended December 31 of 9 million, or $0.07 per share. Core Earnings is a close approximation for taxable earnings out of which we pay our dividends. We declared a dividend for the period of $0.04 per share producing an annualized dividend yield of 4.64% based on the December 31 closing price of $3.45. Our book value at December 31 was $2.34.

As opposed to Core Earnings, we reported GAAP income for the quarter of 8.8 million, or $0.07 a share. At December 31, Chimera was leveraged 2.1-to-one. At December 31, our portfolio of 1.4 billion included non-agency RMBS, Agency RMBS, and secured residential mortgage loans of high credit quality.

During the quarter, we purchased 254 million of new investments from the proceeds of our secondary offering completed in late October. By market value, our RMBS portfolio was composed of approximately 70% of our legacy non-agency RMBS investments, 28% newly purchased Agency RMBS, with the balance in newly purchased deeply discounted Non-Agency RMBS. In aggregate, our portfolio was weighted to hold approximately 66% mortgage-backed securities and 34% secured residential mortgage loans. We sold no assets during the quarter.

Our annualized yield on the portfolio for the quarter was 5.74, and the annualized cost of funds were 3.96 providing annualized interest rate spread of 178. As of quarter end, substantially all of the RMBS in the portfolio are AAA rated. All loans are accruing income, and we have not recorded any charge-offs. During the quarter, we recorded an increase in our loan loss provision of 940,000 that is reflective of an increase in delinquencies and losses at the originator. As we have said before, we have adopted this reserve policy due to the lack of loss history at Chimera.

At this time, I will turn the call back over to the moderator, and we will answer any questions regarding this release.


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