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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (01-07-10 11:10 PM)

Myriad Pharmaceuticals (MYRX)
First Eagle Investment Management disclosed that it owns 2,123,646 shares (8.67%). The firm paid approximately $10.6 million, or $4.99 per share, to acquire its holding, which includes 1,050,000 shares purchased from Dec. 18 through Dec. 21 at $4.84 to $4.90 per share.
First Eagle said that it is evaluating Myriad's proposed stock-for-stock acquisition of Javelin

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Overview

We are a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing, and commercializing novel small molecule drugs that address severe medical conditions with large potential markets, including cancer and HIV infection. Our pipeline includes clinical and preclinical drug candidates with distinct mechanisms of action and novel chemical structures. The discovery and development of each of our drug candidates has been guided by a unique understanding of the genetic causes of human diseases and the genetic factors that may cause drug side effects, drug interactions, and poor drug metabolism. Our extensive experience in human genetics, protein-protein interaction technology and chemical proteomic drug discovery has allowed identification of novel drug targets and accelerated progression from chemical lead compounds to investigational drug candidates.

We currently retain all rights to all of our drug candidates and programs across all geographic markets and therapeutic indications. Our strategy includes establishing our own commercial infrastructure in the United States and clinical development and commercial collaborations in other geographic regions.

Our Clinical-Stage Oncology Programs

We currently have two clinical-stage programs in oncology:


• Azixa . Azixa is our most advanced cancer drug candidate and is being developed for the treatment of advanced primary and metastatic tumors. Azixa is currently in two Phase 2 clinical trials to determine its efficacy in glioblastoma and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In the second quarter of 2009, we initiated a third Phase 2 trial of Azixa as monotherapy in patients with glioblastoma.


• MPC-3100 . MPC-3100 is an Hsp90 inhibitor we are developing for the treatment of cancer. In the second quarter of 2009, we initiated a Phase 1 open-label, dose-finding, multiple-dose clinical trial in patients with refractory or relapsed cancers, including solid tumors, lymphomas and leukemias.

Oncology Market Opportunity

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 11 million people are diagnosed with cancer every year worldwide, and seven million people die from the disease annually. The American Cancer Society estimated that approximately 1.4 million people in the United States would be diagnosed with cancer in 2008, and approximately 566,000 people would die from the disease in 2008. According to a 2007 IMS Health report, oncology products are the largest therapeutic class of pharmaceuticals in the world, with global sales of over $40.0 billion in 2007.

Azixa: Our Lead Drug Candidate for the Treatment of Cancer

Background

Cancers are diseases characterized by abnormal and uncontrolled cell growth and division, typically leading to tumor formation. As a tumor grows, it can directly disrupt organ function at its site of origin. In addition, cancer cells can also spread to other organs, such as the brain, bones and liver, by a process called metastasis. The growth of metastatic tumors at these new sites can disrupt the function of these other organs. There are many kinds of cancer, but all are characterized by uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Cancer tumors cannot grow more than a few millimeters in size, nor can they spread without developing their own network of blood vessels to supply oxygen and nutrients. Anticancer therapies typically consist of drugs which either directly inhibit uncontrolled cell growth and division or restrict oxygen supply to the tumor.

Glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, is a type of brain tumor and is amongst the most highly vascularized tumors, characterized by abnormal vessel structure and unique vascular cells. This vascular hyperplasia is believed to be essential to the rapid growth of the tumor and may offer an opportunity for treatment by agents that are both able to penetrate the brain and selectively disrupt tumor vasculature. The American Cancer Society estimated the incidence of primary central nervous system, or CNS, tumors in the United States in 2007 as 21,810. GBM represents approximately 15-20% of primary brain tumors and prognosis remains poor with median survival estimated to be between 12 to 18 months from the time of diagnosis.

For GBM, first line treatment is surgical resection followed by radiation and administration of temozolomide. At recurrence, there is less guidance, usually resection if possible, re-irradiation and treatment with another systemic chemotherapy or immunotherapy. The treatment of patients with recurrent primary brain tumors is problematic, as the majority of patients with GBM are not candidates for re-operation due to tumor size and location, or poor performance status and only modestly effective therapeutic modalities are available. These therapies include drugs that kill cancer cells, or cytotoxic agents, radioactive seed implants, stereotactic radiotherapies or immunotherapy. Responses to chemotherapy regimes are generally palliative, reducing symptoms but not effecting a cure, and of limited duration. Accordingly, there are currently no approved chemotherapy regimes for recurrent malignant primary brain tumors. Stereotactic radiotherapies, such as radiosurgery or implants, benefit a minority of patients due to the large size and infiltrative nature of recurrent malignant gliomas. Additional fractionated external beam irradiation has only a modest effect on the growth of recurrent tumors and often exacerbates neurologic toxicity.

Few clinical trials address the issue of recurrent GBM and the majority of trials have suffered from comparatively small numbers of highly selected patients treated with a particular therapy. New treatments for GBM are clearly needed.

Melanomas, like GBM, are highly vascularized tumors. There are expected to be approximately 62,000 Americans diagnosed with melanoma this year. Advanced metastatic melanoma is associated with a poor prognosis, and effective treatment options are limited. Patients with stage IV melanoma generally have a median survival of only six to nine months, and a low probability of 10% to 20% for five-year survival. Up to 75% of patients with metastatic melanoma develop brain metastases during the course of their disease. In fact, patients with metastatic melanoma who respond to aggressive systemic therapy often relapse with metastases in the CNS.

Once patients develop brain metastases, treatment is palliative. Surgery and radiosurgery can produce effective palliation in selected cases but are usually restricted to patients with solitary CNS lesions. Radiation therapy is the current standard of care for multiple brain metastases and it can improve neurologic symptoms but does not alter disease outcome. Metastatic melanoma is poorly responsive to chemotherapy, with dacarbazine being the most widely used agent for treatment. Temozolomide is not an FDA-approved therapy for melanoma but is sometimes used, as recent studies indicate patients treated with temozolomide experienced an improvement in quality of life without increasing overall survival. However, only 20% of the temozolomide plasma concentration penetrates the blood brain barrier. Novel agents with better brain penetration are needed.

Azixa Overview

Azixa is a novel, small molecule drug candidate that acts as a microtubule destabilizing agent, causing arrest of cell division and programmed cell death, or apoptosis, in cancer cells. Azixa has also been shown to be a vascular disrupting agent, or VDA, in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer. Thus, Azixa has a dual mode of action; it induces apoptosis and acts as a VDA, resulting in tumor cell death. Importantly, in non-clinical studies, Azixa has demonstrated the unique ability to effectively cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain. Azixa does not appear to be subject to multiple drug resistance. In 2007, we completed two open-label, dose-escalating, multiple dose Phase 1 clinical trials to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of Azixa and to observe any evidence of anti-tumor activity in treatment of a variety of refractory solid tumors with and without brain metastases.

Azixa: Preclinical Development

In vitro mechanism of action studies have shown that Azixa binds to tubulin and destabilizes microtubules, which are cellular structures that play an important role in cell division and proliferation. This leads to inhibition of cell division and apoptosis. However, unlike other tubulin binding drugs, such as vincristine, vinblastine and vinorelbine, and the chemotherapeutic class of drugs known as taxanes, such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, Azixa does not appear to be a substrate for multidrug resistance pumps. The activity of Azixa in multidrug resistant cell lines was similar to its activity in nonresistant cell lines. Azixa has demonstrated potent activity in multiple cancer cell types, including glioma, melanoma, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, breast cancer and ovarian cancer. In mice, Azixa significantly inhibited the growth of a variety of subcutaneously implanted tumor lines.

Azixa has also been shown to act as a VDA in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer. Thus, Azixa has a dual mode of action; it induces apoptosis and acts as a VDA, resulting in tumor cell death. VDAs have been established to reduce interstitial pressure in the tumor microenvironment which may increase local exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Consistent with this hypothesis, Azixa has been demonstrated to act synergistically with the chemotherapeutic agent carboplatin in this mouse model of ovarian cancer. Accordingly, we believe Azixa has the potential to be used either in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapies or as a single agent.

The distribution of Azixa into the CNS was evaluated in mice and the time to maximum drug concentration was the same in both plasma and brain tissue, indicating that Azixa distributed rapidly into the CNS. Remarkably, Azixa concentration in the brain was 14 fold that in the plasma. Similar studies were performed in dogs and demonstrated a 30 fold higher concentration in the brain. These data suggest that it is possible to reach therapeutic drug concentrations of Azixa in the CNS with minimal systemic exposure. Based on these results, we tested the anti-tumor activity (tumor growth and survival) of Azixa in a mouse model in which human glioma cells had been implated in the brain. This study showed a statistically significant reduction in tumor burden and a statistically significant increase in survival when compared to vehicle treated mice.

Azixa: Completed Clinical Development

In 2007, we completed two open-label, dose-escalating, multiple dose Phase 1 clinical trials to investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of Azixa and to observe for any evidence of anti-tumor activity in treatment of a variety of refractory solid tumors with and without brain metastases. In these Phase 1 trials, 6 out of 66 subjects had stable disease ranging from 5 to 16 months and there was no evidence of CNS toxicities or development of peripheral neuropathies.

Azixa: Ongoing and Planned Clinical Development

In 2008, we initiated recruitment of patients for an open-label, dose finding, multiple-dose Phase 2 clinical trial in subjects with recurring/relapsing GBM. We expect to enroll up to 36 subjects in this trial. Patients with recurrent GBM will receive escalating dose levels of Azixa administered in combination with a fixed dose of carboplatin. Study endpoints include determination of the maximum tolerated dose, dose limiting toxicities, and evaluation of evidence of anti-tumor activity of Azixa when given with carboplatin as judged by response rate and progression-free survival. We expect to release the results of this trial in the first half of 2010.

In 2008, we initiated an open-label, dose finding, multiple-dose Phase 2 clinical trial to confirm the safety profile of Azixa in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide, the current standard of care for recurrent metastatic melanoma, and to look for evidence of reduced tumor burden and improved survival. We expect to enroll up to 36 subjects in this trial which will explore Azixa’s efficacy in patients with metastatic melanoma with and without CNS metastasis. Patients with metastatic melanoma will receive escalating dose levels of Azixa administered in combination with a fixed dose of temozolomide. Study endpoints include determination of the maximum tolerated dose, dose limiting toxicities, and evaluation of evidence of anti-tumor activity of Azixa when given with temozolomide as judged by response rate and progression-free survival. We expect to release the results of this trial by the end of 2009.

In both the ongoing GBM (combination with carboplatin) and melanoma trials, we have observed both stable disease and partial responses in evaluable patients.

In the second quarter of 2009, we initiated an open-label Phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate Azixa as monotherapy in patients with GBM. In this planned trial, we currently expect to enroll approximately 68 subjects with first recurrence of GBM .We intend to investigate progression-free survival at six months as a primary endpoint with safety, pharmacokinetic parameters and overall survival as secondary endpoints. We expect this trial to take 12 to 18 months to be completed.

Azixa Safety Summary

In completed and ongoing clinical trials in which 102 subjects have been treated with Azixa, eight serious adverse events in seven subjects have been reported as possibly, probably or definitely related to Azixa: nonfatal myocardial infarction (single events in two subjects), cerebral hemorrhage (single events in two subjects), cerebral ischemia (one event in one subject), troponin I increased (one event in one subject) and hypersensitivity (two events in one subject). To date, the overall incidence of myocardial infarction is 2.0%, the incidence of cerebral hemorrhage is 2.0%, the incidence of cerebral ischemia is 1.0% and the incidence of troponin I increase is 1.0%.

MPC-3100 for the Treatment of Cancer

Background

Heat shock protein 90, or Hsp90, is a chaperone protein that plays an important role in regulating the activity and function of numerous signaling proteins, or client proteins, that trigger proliferation of cancer cells. Important client proteins in cancer include steroid hormone receptors, protein kinases, mutant p53, and telomerase h-TERT. Hsp90 binds and stabilizes these client proteins and inhibition of Hsp90 leads to degradation of the client proteins important for growth of the cancer.

Early Hsp90 inhibitors have been analogs of the natural product molecule geldanamycin that have demonstrated promising preclinical and clinical proof of concept activity, but have been challenging to develop because of drug related toxicities, including hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and pancreatitis that do not appear to be related to inhibition of Hsp90. Additional limitations to geldanamycin derivatives include poor solubility, metabolic stability and difficulty in administration.

MPC-3100: Development

MPC-3100 is a fully synthetic, orally bioavailable, non-geldanamycin compound that has shown significant and broad preclinical anti-tumor activity in mouse models of human cancers. MPC-3100 has not demonstrated the same hepatic or renal toxicity in vivo as the geldanamycin analogs. MPC-3100 inhibits Hsp90 by binding to the same site as geldanamycin and has displayed potent anticancer activity in several in vitro and in vivo models. MPC-3100 significantly and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth in multiple studies conducted in mice implanted with a variety of human cancer cell lines, including colon, prostate, myeloid leukemia, small cell lung, gastric, breast, and ovarian cancers.

We submitted an investigational new drug application, or IND, for MPC-3100 in the first quarter of 2009 and initiated patient enrollment of a Phase 1 clinical trial in the second quarter of 2009 to investigate the safety and tolerability of MPC-3100, pharmacokinetics, and the potential for anti-tumor activity. This trial is an open-label, multiple-dose, dose escalation design in up to 40 subjects with refractory or relapsed cancer. Physical examination findings, electrocardiograms, pharmacokinetics, clinical laboratory parameters, and adverse events will be evaluated in subjects at each dose level to assess safety. Disease progression will be evaluated using standard clinical practice guidelines for each patient’s cancer type. In this ongoing study, MPC-3100 has been observed to be orally bioavailable in cancer patients. The pharmacokinetic properties and drug concentration achieved in patients to date are similar to those observed in efficacious animal studies and no dose limiting toxicities have been reported to date.

Our Clinical-Stage HIV Programs

We currently have two clinical-stage programs for the treatment of HIV:


•

MPC-4326 . MPC-4326 is a first-in-class small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 maturation that we are developing for the oral treatment of HIV infection. To date, over 740 subjects, including over 180 HIV-infected patients, have been studied in clinical trials of MPC-4326. Results from these trials have shown MPC-4326 to be well tolerated and have demonstrated significant and clinically relevant reductions in viral load. We expect to initiate a Phase 2b clinical trial of MPC-4326 in treatment-experienced HIV patients by the end of 2009.


•

MPC-9055 . MPC-9055 is also a small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 maturation that we are developing for the oral treatment of HIV infection. MPC-9055 is a backup program to MPC-4326 and is ready to begin Phase 2 clinical development.

HIV Background and Market Opportunity

Infection by HIV causes a slowly progressive deterioration of the immune system resulting in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, or AIDS. Approximately 33 million people worldwide are living with HIV. In North America, Central Europe and Western Europe, HIV infects approximately 2.1 million people. Approximately 475,000 patients are currently being treated for HIV with antiretroviral, or ARV, drug therapy in the United States. With new HIV testing mandates from both governmental and academic groups, more people with HIV are expected to seek treatment.

Several major classes of ARV drugs are available for use by patients, including reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, NTRTIs, NNRTIs), protease inhibitors, a fusion inhibitor (enfuvirtide), an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir) and a CCR5 antagonist (maraviroc). Up to 85% of treated patients harbor at least some drug-resistant HIV strains, as do up to approximately 25% of newly diagnosed patients, making drug resistance a major problem in the treatment of HIV. As a result, patient treatment regimens must include the use of at least three drugs in combination and may require frequent readjustment. HIV drug treatment regimens can include multiple drugs from the same class, and increasingly include drugs available as co-formulations or fixed dosage combinations. Some recent data suggests that as many as one third of patients change their HIV treatment regimen each year, a manifestation of this treatment resistance in patients. These treatment changes, coupled with approximately 25,000 patients who start treatment each year, result in opportunities for new products to be incorporated into the new treatment regimens.

In 2005, worldwide sales for NRTIs and NRTI co-formulations totaled approximately $4.3 billion. In 2005, worldwide sales for NNRTIs and protease inhibitors totaled approximately $1.0 billion and $2.2 billion, respectively. A recent Datamonitor report estimates that the HIV drug market will be over $10 billion globally by the year 2015, largely due to the launch of new classes of drugs.

Because the most important problem in treating HIV is the emergence of viral strains that are resistant to currently approved drugs, our proprietary discovery technologies focus on novel targets in the virus life cycle, including virus maturation and virus fusion. Our primary aim is to develop small molecule oral drugs that treat HIV by addressing these novel targets. By focusing on novel classes of ARVs, we aim to meet the growing unmet need caused by resistance development to current classes of ARVs.

MPC-4326 for the Treatment of HIV

MPC-4326 is a first-in-class, small molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 maturation we are developing for the oral treatment of HIV infection that we acquired from Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in January 2009. MPC-4326 has demonstrated potent activity against a broad range of HIV strains, and laboratory studies have shown MPC-4326 to be an inhibitor of HIV isolates that are resistant to a large range of currently approved HIV drugs. Over 740 subjects, including over 180 HIV-infected subjects, have been studied in clinical trials of MPC-4326. Results from these trials have shown MPC-4326 to be well tolerated and have demonstrated significant and clinically relevant reductions in viral load in a subset of HIV-infected patients representing approximately 60% of HIV-infected patients, who can be identified by a simple, rapid and inexpensive assay of the HIV virus. In a Phase 2 clinical trial completed in 2008, MPC-4326 met its primary objective by demonstrating drug plasma levels in HIV-positive subjects to be in a target range for virologic reduction. In addition, MPC-4326’s safety profile was comparable to earlier studies where it had been indistinguishable from placebo. We expect to initiate a Phase 2b trial of MPC-4326 by the end of 2009.

MPC-4326: Preclinical Development

MPC-4326 is the first of a class of ARV drugs which inhibit HIV-1 replication by interfering with the maturation of the HIV-1 virus. Specifically, MPC-4326 interferes with a late step in the processing of the HIV-1 Gag protein. This inhibition leads to formation of noninfectious, immature virus particles, thus preventing subsequent rounds of HIV infection. As expected for a novel mechanism of action, MPC-4326 retains inhibitory activity against HIV-1 isolates resistant to the four classes of currently approved drugs commonly used by HIV-infected patients: NRTIs, NNRTIs, protease inhibitors and fusion inhibitors. As a corollary to this, isolates resistant to MPC-4326 have been shown to be fully sensitive to all classes of approved anti-HIV drugs. No cross-resistance has been observed. In addition, in vitro combination activity studies have demonstrated that MPC-4326 was synergistic when combined with most approved anti-HIV drugs that have been tested.

MPC-4326: Completed Phase 2 Clinical Trials

A Phase 2 clinical trial of MPC-4326 in HIV patients met its primary endpoint by demonstrating a statistically significant reduction in the viral load compared to placebo. This trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 trial conducted in the United States. MPC-4326 at one of four doses (25 mg,

50 mg, 100 mg or 200 mg) or placebo (six to eight subjects per group) was administered orally in a liquid formulation once daily for 10 days to HIV-positive subjects who were not on other ARV therapy during the trial and for at least the previous 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was viral load reduction on day 11. Secondary endpoints included safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics.

At the 50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg doses, MPC-4326 treatment for ten days resulted in statistically significant reductions in viral load compared to placebo, with decreases of up to 98%, in individual subjects. The magnitude of viral load reduction increased with increasing MPC-4326 dose, and reduction in viral load compared to placebo was seen in both treatment-naive and in treatment-experienced subjects, confirming the potent antiviral activity of MPC-4326. In this trial, all doses were well tolerated with no Grade 3 or 4 treatment-related laboratory abnormalities. All adverse events were of mild to moderate intensity and no dose-limiting toxicity was identified. One serious adverse event was considered to be possibly drug related. It involved a subject with a 5-year history of hypertension and recent poor medication compliance who exhibited transient findings of a type of stroke which is a known complication of hypertension. This event resolved without consequence.

A second Phase 2 clinical trial of MPC-4326 was conducted at multiple clinical sites in the United States. In this trial, initially using a 50 mg tablet formulation, MPC-4326 was administered to 46 HIV-positive subjects in combination with approved HIV drugs. Subjects failing standard of care therapies were enrolled in this trial and received either placebo or MPC-4326 at one of several doses. The primary efficacy endpoint of the trial was viral load reduction after two weeks of MPC-4326 dosing on top of subjects’ background drug regimens. Additional endpoints of this trial were safety after two weeks and, for the first (tablet) cohort only, safety and viral load reduction after an additional ten weeks of dosing on top of optimized background therapy.

Due to stability problems with the 50 mg tablet, the protocol was revised to allow dosing with the liquid formulation. Consistent with earlier data from trials in healthy volunteers, there were generally proportional increases in plasma concentration associated with increased MPC-4326 doses. The MPC-4326 trough concentration, also referred to as C min (the blood level 24 hours after dosing), that appears to be associated with a virologic response is 20 µg/mL, a mean threshold that was achieved in a substantial majority of subjects in this clinical trial.

The efficacy data from this trial suggest that there are two populations of subjects, responders and non-responders. Statistically significant differences between responders and non-responders exist for certain changes, or polymorphisms, in the viral DNA sequences encoding the Gag protein, or viral genotype, which is the molecular target of MPC-4326. Responders generally have none of these polymorphisms in Gag, while non-responders generally have at least one polymorphism. Of the subjects who received active MPC-4326 treatment, 34% had more than a 90% viral load reduction at day 15. Of those subjects who had a C min of at least 20 µg/mL and had no Gag polymorphisms, 77% had at least a 90% viral load reduction at day 15. We anticipate that future clinical trials of MPC-4326 will enroll patients having a Gag genotype correlated with a positive drug response. The most commonly reported adverse events for subjects receiving MPC-4326 were diarrhea, nausea, headache, abnormal dreams, and dizziness.

A recently completed Phase 2 clinical trial conducted in Australia was designed to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and ARV activity of 200 mg twice daily or 300 mg twice daily doses of MPC-4326 administered as monotherapy to 32 HIV-positive patients for 14 days. Patients were stratified on the basis of prior ARV therapy use; 26 patients were treatment-naĂŻve and six were treatment-experienced. All patients were treated exclusively with MPC-4326 for 14 days; no placebo was used. Treatment-experienced patients discontinued their ARV therapy regimen at least three days prior to the start of MPC-4326 treatment. At the end of the 14 day treatment period, six patients continued treatment in an open-label extension study.

Consistent with other trials in both healthy volunteer subjects and in HIV-positive patients, the rate and type of treatment emergent adverse events was primarily gastrointestinal or CNS related and judged to be of mild intensity. There were no serious adverse events, no treatment related discontinuations and no deaths reported. All patients, regardless of dose, had MPC-4326 plasma concentrations in excess of the previously identified target levels required for treatment response. Confirming observations made in previous trials, there were two populations of subjects with respect to viral load reduction, responders and non-responders. The statistically significant differences in viral load reductions between these two populations appear to be explained by certain polymorphisms in the viral genome encoding the Gag protein. Four subjects continued to be treated in an open-label extension study through 48 weeks and have maintained undetectable viral load.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

Overview

We were incorporated in Delaware in January 2009 as a new, wholly owned subsidiary of Myriad Genetics, Inc. in order to effect the separation and spin-off of Myriad Genetics’ research and drug development businesses as a stand-alone, independent, publicly traded company. In connection with the formation of this new subsidiary, Myriad Genetics’ existing subsidiary, Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc., changed its corporate name to Myriad Therapeutics, Inc., and we adopted the name of Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc. On June 30, 2009, Myriad Genetics contributed substantially all of the assets and certain liabilities of its research and drug development businesses as well as $188 million in cash and marketable securities to us and effected the spin-off of our company through a pro rata dividend distribution to its stockholders of all outstanding shares of our common stock.

Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing, and commercializing novel small molecule drugs that address severe medical conditions with large potential markets, including cancer and HIV infection. Our pipeline includes clinical and preclinical drug candidates with distinct mechanisms of action and novel chemical structures. The discovery and development of each of our drug candidates has been guided by a unique understanding of the genetic causes of human diseases and the genetic factors that may cause drug side effects, drug interactions, and poor drug metabolism. Our extensive experience in human genetics, protein-protein interaction technology and chemical proteomic drug discovery has allowed identification of novel drug targets and accelerated progression from chemical lead compounds to investigational drug candidates.

We operate in one reportable operating segment that includes research and drug development. Until the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008, our revenues have consisted primarily of research payments related to research collaboration agreements. In fiscal 2008, our revenue included a $100.0 million non-refundable fee received from H. Lundbeck A/S, or Lundbeck, in connection with an agreement granting Lundbeck European commercialization rights to Flurizan, our former drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. During the year ended June 30, 2009, we reported a net loss of $58.1 million.

We expect to incur significant net losses for the foreseeable future and that such losses will fluctuate from quarter to quarter and that such fluctuations may be substantial. Additionally, we expect to incur substantial sales, marketing and other expenses in preparation for the commercialization of our drug candidates and some of these expenses will be incurred prior to FDA approval, which approval is not assured.

Our drug development research and development expenses include costs incurred for our current clinical-stage drug candidates as well as our discontinued drug candidates Flurizan and MPC-9055. Currently, the only costs we track by each drug candidate are external costs such as services provided to us by clinical research organizations, manufacturing of drug supply, and other outsourced research. We do not assign or allocate internal costs such as salaries and benefits, facilities costs, lab supplies and the costs of preclinical research and studies to individual development programs. We also incurred costs related to external research collaborations from our research services business. We track all underlying principal costs associated with our research collaborations.

We do not know if we will be successful in developing any of our drug candidates. While expenses associated with the completion of our current clinical programs are expected to be substantial and increase, we believe that accurately projecting total program-specific expenses through commercialization is not possible at this time. The timing and amount of these expenses will depend upon the costs associated with potential future clinical trials of our drug candidates, and the related expansion of our research and development organization, regulatory requirements, advancement of our preclinical programs and product manufacturing costs, many of which cannot be determined with accuracy at this time. We are also unable to predict when, if ever, material net cash inflows will commence from our drug candidates. This is due to the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with the duration and cost of clinical trials, which vary significantly over the life of a project as a result of unanticipated events arising during clinical development, including:


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the scope, rate of progress, and expense of our clinical trials and other research and development activities;


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the length of time required to enroll suitable subjects;


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the number of subjects that ultimately participate in the trials;


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the efficacy and safety results of our clinical trials and the number of additional required clinical trials;


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the terms and timing of regulatory approvals;


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our ability to market, commercialize, manufacture and supply, and achieve market acceptance for our drug candidates that we are developing or may develop in the future; and


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the filing, prosecuting, defending or enforcing any patent claims or other intellectual property rights.

A change in the outcome of any of the foregoing variables in the development of a drug candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of that drug candidate. For example, if the FDA or another regulatory authority were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those which we currently anticipate to complete clinical development of a drug candidate, or if we experience significant delays in the enrollment of patients in any of our clinical trials, we would be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of clinical development.
Critical Accounting Policies and Use of Estimates

Critical accounting policies are those policies which are both important to the portrayal of a company’s financial condition and results and require management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. Our critical accounting policies are as follows:


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revenue recognition;


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clinical trial expenses; and


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share-based payment expense.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue from non-refundable upfront license fees where we have continuing involvement is recognized ratably over the development or agreement period or upon termination of a development or license agreement when we have no ongoing obligation.

Research revenue includes revenue from research services agreements, milestone payments, and technology licensing agreements. In applying the principles of SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104, Revenue Recognition , as well as Emerging Issues Task Force, or EITF, 00-21, Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables , or EITF 00-21, to research and technology license agreements we consider the terms and conditions of each agreement separately to arrive at a proportional performance methodology of recognizing revenue. Such methodologies involve recognizing revenue on a straight-line basis over the term of the agreement, as underlying research costs are incurred, or on the basis of contractually defined output measures such as units delivered. We make adjustments, if necessary, to the estimates used in our calculations as work progresses and we gain experience. The principal costs under these agreements are for personnel expenses to conduct research and development but also include costs for materials and other direct and indirect items necessary to complete the research under these agreements. Actual results may vary from our estimates. Payments received on uncompleted long-term contracts may be greater than or less than incurred costs and estimated earnings and have been recorded as other receivables or deferred revenues in the accompanying balance sheets. Revenue from milestone payments for which we have no continuing performance obligations is recognized upon achievement of the related milestone. When we have continuing performance obligations, the milestone payments are deferred and recognized as revenue over the term of the arrangement as we complete our performance obligations. We recognize revenue from upfront nonrefundable license fees on a straight-line basis over the period of our continued involvement in the research and development project.

Clinical Trial Expenses

The cost of our clinical trials is based, in part, on estimates of the services received and efforts expended pursuant to contracts with numerous clinical trial centers and clinical research organizations (the CROs). In the normal course of business, we contract with third parties to perform various clinical trial activities in the ongoing development of our drug candidates. The financial terms of these agreements vary from contract to contract, are subject to negotiation and may result in uneven payment flows. Payments under the contracts depend on factors such as the achievement of certain events, the successful enrollment of patients or the completion of portions of the clinical trial or similar conditions. The objective of our accrual policy is to match the recording of expenses in our financial statements to the actual services received and efforts expended. As such, we recognize direct expenses related to each patient enrolled in a clinical trial on an estimated cost-per-patient basis as services are performed. In addition to considering information from our clinical operations group regarding the status of our clinical trials, we rely on information from CROs, such as estimated costs per patient, to calculate our accrual for direct clinical expenses at the end of each reporting period. For indirect expenses, which relate to site and other administrative costs to manage our clinical trials, we rely on information provided by the CRO, including costs incurred by the CRO as of a particular reporting date, to calculate our indirect clinical expenses. In the event of early termination of a clinical trial, we would recognize expenses in an amount based on our estimate of the remaining non-cancelable obligations associated with the winding down of the clinical trial, which we would confirm directly with the CRO.

If our CROs were to either under or over report the costs that they have incurred or if there is a change in the estimated per patient costs, it could have an impact on our clinical trial expenses during the period in which they report a change in estimated costs to us. Adjustments to our clinical trial accruals primarily relate to indirect costs, for which we place significant reliance on our CROs for accurate information at the end of each reporting period.

Share-Based Payment Expense

Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, Statement No. 123R, Share-Based Payment , or SFAS 123R, sets accounting requirements for “share-based” compensation to employees, including employee stock purchase plans, and requires us to recognize, as expense, in our statements of operations, the grant-date fair value of our stock options and other equity-based compensation. The determination of grant-date fair value is estimated using an option-pricing model, which includes variables such as the terms of each grant, the expected volatility of our share price, the exercise behavior of our employees, interest rates, and dividend yields. These variables are projected based on our historical data, experience, and other factors. Changes in any of these variables could result in material adjustments to the expense recognized for share-based payments.

In connection with the separation and related transactions, each outstanding Myriad Genetics stock option was converted into an adjusted Myriad Genetics common stock option, exercisable for the same number of shares of common stock as the original Myriad Genetics option, and a new MPI common stock option, exercisable for one-fourth of the number of shares of common stock as the original Myriad Genetics option. An adjusted exercise price of each converted option was determined in accordance with Section 409A and Section 422 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. All other terms of the converted options remain the same however; the vesting and expiration of the converted options will be based on the optionholder’s continuing employment with Myriad Genetics or MPI, as applicable, following the separation.

As a result of the option modifications that occurred in connection with the separation from Myriad Genetics, Myriad Genetics measured the potential accounting impact of these option modifications as set forth in SFAS 123R paragraphs 53 and 54. Based upon the analysis, which included a comparison of the fair value of the modified options granted to our employees and directors immediately after the modification with the fair value of the original option immediately prior to the modification, it was determined that there was no incremental compensation expense. All unrecognized SFAS 123R compensation expense at June 30, 2009, that is related to Myriad Genetics options and MPI options that are held by current MPI employees and directors will be recognized by us over the remaining vesting term of the option. All such expense relating to MPI options held by current and former Myriad Genetics employees, directors or consultants will not be recognized by us.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2008, the FASB issued FSP No. 157-2, which delays the effective date of FAS 157 for non-financial assets and non-financial liabilities, except for items that are recognized or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis (items that are re-measured at least annually). The FSP deferred the effective date of FAS 157 for non-financial assets and non-financial liabilities until our fiscal year beginning on July 1, 2009. The adoption of this standard by us is not expected to have a material effect on our financial statements.

Results of Operations

The balance sheet as of June 30, 2009 and notes related thereto reflect the opening balances of MPI as an independent company. All other amounts reflected in the financial statements include the assets, liabilities and results of operations of the components of Myriad Genetics that constituted the research and drug development

businesses that were separated. The financial statements have been prepared using Myriad Genetics’ historical costs basis of the assets and liabilities of the various activities that reflect the combined results of operations, financial condition and cash flows of us as a component of Myriad Genetics. Specific costs attributable to our operations have been included in the financial statements. The financial statements also include some proportional cost allocations of certain common costs of Myriad Genetics because these expenses were not specifically identified at the subsidiary level. The basis of these allocations includes full-time equivalent employees for the respective periods presented, square footage, and other appropriate allocation drivers.

The financial information in the financial statements does not include all of the expenses that would have been incurred had we been a separate, stand-alone publicly traded entity, including, but not limited to, costs to implement accounting, human resource, payroll, purchasing, information technology, legal and other business functions and systems. As such, the financial information herein does not reflect the financial position, results of operations or cash flows of us in the future or what they would have been, had we been a separate, stand-alone entity during the periods presented.

Years ended June 30, 2009 and 2008

Research and other revenue is comprised of research payments received pursuant to external collaborative agreements. Research revenue for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 was $5.5 million compared to $6.8 million in the prior year. The 19% decrease in research revenue was primarily attributable to the completion of genomic sequencing research collaboration in September 2008. Research revenue from our research collaboration agreements is recognized using a proportional performance methodology. Consequently, as these programs progress and outputs increase or decrease, revenue may increase or decrease proportionately.

Pharmaceutical revenue is comprised of co-marketing agreement payments received relating to our former drug candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, Flurizan. On May 21, 2008, we entered into an agreement with Lundbeck for European commercialization of Flurizan. As consideration for entering into the agreement we received a $100.0 million non-refundable upfront fee which we expected to recognize over 15 years. On June 30, 2008, we announced the results of our U.S. 18-month Phase 3 clinical trial of Flurizan in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease. The trial did not achieve statistical significance on either of its primary endpoints, cognition and activities of daily living. As a result we discontinued all ongoing Flurizan clinical studies in 2008, including the decision to discontinue our global Phase 3 trial, and have no further performance obligations under the agreement. The discontinuance of the Flurizan development program and any ongoing development activity related to Flurizan resulted in the recognition of the full $100.0 million upfront fee as pharmaceutical revenue in fiscal 2008. In the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008, we recognized $104 million in pharmaceutical and other revenues relating to payments received under the agreement with Lundbeck. We had no pharmaceutical or other revenue in fiscal 2009.

Research and development expenses are comprised primarily of salaries and related personnel costs, laboratory supplies, equipments costs, facilities expense, and costs associated with our clinical trials. Research and development expenses for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 were $54.6 million compared to $121.5 million in 2008. This 55% decrease was primarily due to:


•

decreased external drug development costs of approximately $76.0 million resulting from the discontinuance of our former drug candidate Flurizan that includes a $9.0 million credit, recorded in fiscal 2009, resulting from the difference in an estimated sublicense fee accrual recorded in fiscal 2008 and amounts actually paid in 2009;

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increased external drug development costs of approximately $2.5 million and $1.3 million for MPC-3100 and Azixa, respectively, our oncology drug candidates currently in clinical development; and

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a decrease of approximately $2.9 million due to the completion of external research collaborations.

We expect our research and development expenses will fluctuate over the next several years as we conduct additional clinical trials to support the potential commercialization of our drug candidates currently in clinical development, including Azixa, MPC-3100 and MPC-4326, and advance other drug candidates into clinical development.

Selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and related personnel costs for marketing, executive, legal, finance and accounting, information technology, human resources, and allocated facilities expenses. Selling, general and administrative expenses for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 were $9.0 million, compared to $20.6 million in 2008. The decrease in selling, general and administrative expenses of 56% was due primarily to a decrease in commercialization efforts and internal expense allocations resulting from the discontinuance of our drug candidate Flurizan. We expect our selling, general and administrative expenses will continue to fluctuate depending on our drug discovery and drug development efforts.

We had no other income (expense) for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 compared to a $3.0 million net expense for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008. This change was primarily attributable to the write-off of $3 million of our preferred stock investment in Encore Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (from whom we had previously licensed Flurizan) in 2008 as a result of our discontinuation of our drug candidate Flurizan.

Years ended June 30, 2008 and 2007

Research and other revenue for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008 was $10.8 million compared to $11.8 million for the prior fiscal year. This 9% decrease in research and other revenue was primarily attributable to the successful completion of research collaborations during 2008.

In the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008, we recognized $104 million in pharmaceutical and other revenues relating to payments made under the agreement with Lundbeck. We had no pharmaceutical revenue in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2007. •

increased external drug development costs associated with our HIV drug candidates of $9.2 million due to the purchase of in process research and development related to MPC-4326 and further development of this drug candidate, which was offset by a $2.0 million decrease in expenditures relating to MPC-9055;

Other income (expense), net for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008 decreased $3.6 million from net income of $0.6 million for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2007 to a $3.0 million net expense for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008. The decrease was primarily attributable to the write-off of $3.0 million of our preferred stock investment in Encore Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (from whom we had previously licensed Flurizan) in 2008 as a result of our discontinuation of our drug candidate Flurizan. We had no tax expense during the period due to our net loss position.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Net cash used in operating activities was $60.7 million during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 compared to $12.2 million provided by operating activities during the prior fiscal year. The change in cash flow from operating activity can be attributed primarily to the higher net loss in fiscal 2009 and the payment of accrued expenses associated with the our former drug candidate Flurizan. These were offset, in part, by higher non-cash charges associated with share-based compensation and the write-off of purchased in-process research and development recorded in fiscal 2009.

Our investing activities used $7.4 million in cash during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2009 compared to $2.6 million during the prior fiscal year. The change is primarily due to the acquisition of in-process research and development in fiscal 2009, offset by a reduction in capital expenditures for research equipment.

Approximately $196.4 million in cash was provided by financing activities during fiscal 2009, which amount reflects cash and the changes in Myriad Genetics net investment in MPI both of which were contributed to capital in connection with the spin-off. During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2008, financing activities used cash of $9.6 million, which represents the net change in Myriad Genetics’ net investment in MPI.

Prior to June 30, 2009, all cash and investments were held and managed by Myriad Genetics. Accordingly, cash used to pay our expenses or cash collected from collaboration agreements was provided or received by Myriad Genetics on our behalf and were recorded as an increase or decrease in the Myriad Genetics net investment (capital deficiency).

On June 30, 2009 Myriad Genetics contributed substantially all of the assets and certain liabilities of its research and drug development businesses as well as $188.0 million in cash and marketable securities to us. We believe that with our existing capital resources, we will have adequate funds to maintain our current and planned operations through at least June 30, 2012, although no assurance can be given that changes will not occur that would consume available capital resources before such time and we may need or want to raise additional financing within this period of time.


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