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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (05-15-08 06:31 AM)

BristolMyers Squibb Company. CEO JAMES M CORNELIUS bought 100000 shares on 5-7-2008 at $22.83

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

General

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (which may be referred to as Bristol-Myers Squibb, BMS or the Company) was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in August 1933 under the name Bristol-Myers Company, as successor to a New York business started in 1887. In 1989, Bristol-Myers Company changed its name to Bristol-Myers Squibb Company as a result of a merger. The Company, through its divisions and subsidiaries, is engaged in the discovery, development, licensing, manufacturing, marketing, distribution and sale of pharmaceuticals and other health care related products.

Acquisitions and Divestitures

In July 2007, the Company completed the sale of the BUFFERIN* and EXCEDRIN* brands in Japan, Asia (excluding China and Taiwan) and certain Oceanic countries to Lion Corporation (Japan) for $247 million in cash. As a result of this transaction, the Company recognized a pre-tax gain of $247 million ($144 million net of tax) in the third quarter of 2007.

In October 2007, the Company completed the acquisition of Adnexus Therapeutics, Inc. (Adnexus), developer of a new therapeutic class of biologics called ADNECTINS, for a net purchase price of $415 million. In addition, in the event that certain future development and regulatory milestones are achieved, the Company is obligated under the terms of the agreement to pay the former stockholders of Adnexus up to an additional $74 million.

In December 2007, the Company entered into a definitive agreement with Avista Capital Partners L.P. (Avista) for the sale of its Medical Imaging business for a purchase price of approximately $525 million in cash, subject to customary post-closing adjustments. The closing of the transaction was completed on January 7, 2008. As a result of this transaction, the Company expects to recognize a pre-tax gain of approximately $20 million to $40 million ($30 million to $50 million loss net of tax) in the first quarter of 2008, subject to the post-closing adjustments.

Bristol-Myers Squibb Website

The Company’s internet website address is www.bms.com . The Company makes available free of charge on its website its annual, quarterly and current reports, including amendments to such reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company electronically files such material with, or furnishes such material to, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Information relating to corporate governance at Bristol-Myers Squibb, including the Company’s Standards of Business Conduct and Ethics, Code of Ethics for Senior Financial Officers, Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Directors, (collectively, the “Codes”), Corporate Governance Guidelines, and information concerning the Company’s Executive Committee, Board of Directors, including Board Committees and Committee charters, and transactions in Bristol-Myers Squibb securities by Directors and executive officers, is available on the Company’s website at www.bms.com under the “Investors—Corporate Governance” caption and in print to any stockholder upon request. Any waivers to the Codes by directors or executive officers and any material amendment to the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Directors and Code of Ethics for Senior Financial Officers will be posted promptly on the Company’s website. Information relating to stockholder services, including the Company’s Dividend Reinvestment Plan and direct deposit of dividends, is available on the Company’s website at www.bms.com under the “Investors—Stockholder Services” caption.

The Company incorporates by reference certain information from parts of its proxy statement for the 2008 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. The SEC allows the Company to disclose important information by referring to it in that manner. Please refer to such information. The Company’s proxy statement for the 2008 Annual Meeting of Stockholders and 2007 Annual Report will be available on the Company’s website ( www.bms.com ) under the “Investors—SEC Filings” caption on or after March 21, 2008.

Business Segments

The Company has three reportable segments—Pharmaceuticals, Nutritionals and ConvaTec (previously a component of the Other Health Care operating segment). In January 2008, the Company completed the sale of its Medical Imaging business to Avista. The results of the Medical Imaging business previously included in the former Other Health Care operating segment, are presented as part of the Company’s results from discontinued operations.

The Pharmaceuticals segment is made up of the global pharmaceutical and international consumer medicines business. The Pharmaceuticals segment accounted for 81% of the Company’s sales in 2007, 80% of the Company’s sales in 2006, and 83% of the Company’s sales in 2005. U.S. Pharmaceuticals sales accounted for 58%, 54% and 54% of total Pharmaceutical sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, while international Pharmaceutical sales accounted for 42%, 46% and 46% of total Pharmaceutical sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

The other two segments – Nutritionals and ConvaTec – comprise the Company’s Health Care Group. The Nutritionals segment consists of Mead Johnson Nutritionals (Mead Johnson), primarily an infant formula and children’s nutritionals business. The ConvaTec segment consists of the ostomy, wound and skin care business. Health Care Group sales accounted for 19% of the Company’s sales in 2007, 20% of the Company’s sales in 2006, and 17% of the Company’s sales in 2005. U.S. Health Care Group sales accounted for 40%, 42% and 43% of total Health Care Group sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, while international Health Care Group sales accounted for 60%, 58% and 57% of total Health Care Group sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively.

For additional information about these segments, see “Item 8. Financial Statements—Note 19. Segment Information.”

Pharmaceuticals Segment

The Pharmaceuticals segment competes with other worldwide research-based drug companies, smaller research companies and generic drug manufacturers. These products are sold worldwide, primarily to wholesalers, retail pharmacies, hospitals, government entities and the medical profession. The Company manufactures these products in the U.S. and Puerto Rico and in 14 foreign countries. U.S Pharmaceuticals net sales accounted for 58%, 54% and 54% of total Pharmaceuticals net sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, while Pharmaceuticals net sales in Europe, Middle East and Africa accounted for 25%, 28% and 29% of total Pharmaceuticals net sales in 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively. Pharmaceuticals net sales in Japan accounted for 4% of total Pharmaceuticals net sales in each of 2007, 2006 and 2005.

The Company’s key products include PLAVIX* (clopidogrel bisulfate), AVAPRO/AVALIDE* (irbesartan/irbesartan–hy drochlorothiazide), REYATAZ (atazanavir sulfate), ABILIFY* (aripiprazole), ERBITUX* (cetuximab), SPRYCEL (dasatinib), BARACLUDE (entecavir), ORENCIA (abatacept), the SUSTIVA Franchise (efavirenz) and IXEMPRA (ixabepilone).

The composition of matter patent for PLAVIX*, which expires in 2011, is currently the subject of patent litigation in the U.S. with Apotex Inc. and Apotex Corp. (Apotex) and other generic companies as well as in other less significant jurisdictions. As previously disclosed, on August 8, 2006, Apotex launched a generic clopidogrel bisulfate product that competes with PLAVIX*. The generic launch had a significant adverse impact on PLAVIX* sales, which the Company estimates to be in a range of $250 million to $350 million in 2007 and $1.2 billion to $1.4 billion in 2006. Estimated total U.S. prescription demand for clopidogrel bisulfate (branded and generic) increased 8% in 2007 compared to 2006, while estimated total U.S. prescription demand for branded PLAVIX* increased 34% in the same period. The Company believes that the supply of generic clopidogrel bisulfate that was sold into distribution channels following the Apotex at-risk launch in August 2006 has been substantially depleted. In June 2007, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (District Court) upheld the composition of matter patent for PLAVIX* and enjoined Apotex from engaging in any activity that infringes the patent, including marketing its generic product in the U.S. until after the patent expires. Apotex has appealed the District Court’s decision. The Apotex appeal date has been set for March 2008. The damages phase of the trial is on-going. For more information about the pending PLAVIX* litigation, as well as the generic launch by Apotex, see “Item 8. Financial Statements —Note 22. Legal Proceedings and Contingencies.” Products

Most of the Company’s pharmaceutical revenues come from products in the following therapeutic classes: cardiovascular; virology, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; oncology; affective and other (psychiatric) disorders; and immunoscience.

In the pharmaceutical industry, the majority of an innovative product’s commercial value is usually realized during the period in which the product has market exclusivity. Market exclusivity is based upon patent rights and/or certain regulatory forms of exclusivity. In the U.S. and some other countries, when these patent rights and other forms of exclusivity expire and generic versions of a medicine are approved and marketed, there are often very substantial and rapid declines in the sales of the original innovative product. The Company’s business is focused on innovative pharmaceutical products, and the Company relies on patent rights and other forms of protection to maintain the market exclusivity of its products. For further discussion of patents rights and regulatory forms of exclusivity, see “—Intellectual Property and Product Exclusivity” below. For further discussion of the impact of generic competition on the Company’s business, see “—Generic Competition” below.

An increasing portion of the Company’s innovative pharmaceutical products are biological products, or biologics. Currently, generic versions of biological products cannot be approved under U.S. law. However, the law could change in the future. Even in the absence of new legislation, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is taking steps toward allowing generic versions of certain biologics. Competitors seeking approval of biological products must file their own safety and efficacy data, and address the challenges of biologics manufacturing, which involves more complex processes and are more costly than those of traditional pharmaceutical operations.

The chart below shows the net sales of key products in the Pharmaceuticals segment, together with the year in which the basic exclusivity loss (patent rights or data exclusivity) occurred or is currently estimated to occur in the U.S., the European Union (EU) and Japan. The Company also sells its pharmaceutical products in other countries; however, data is not provided on a country-by-country basis because individual country sales are not significant outside the U.S., the EU and Japan. In many instances, the basic exclusivity loss date listed below is the expiration date of the patent that claims the active ingredient of the drug or the method of using the drug for the approved indication. In some instances, the basic exclusivity loss date listed in the chart is the expiration date of the data exclusivity period. In situations where there is only data exclusivity without patent protection, a competitor could seek regulatory approval by submitting its own clinical trial data to obtain marketing approval prior to the expiration of data exclusivity.

The Company estimates the market exclusivity period for each of its products on a case-by-case basis for the purposes of business planning only. The length of market exclusivity for any of the Company’s products is impossible to predict with certainty because of the complex interaction between patent and regulatory forms of exclusivity and the inherent uncertainties regarding patent litigation. Although the Company provides these estimates for business planning purposes, these are not intended as an indication of how the Company’s patents might fare in any particular patent litigation brought against potential infringers. There can be no assurance that a particular product will enjoy market exclusivity for the full period of time that appears in the estimate or that the exclusivity will be limited to the estimate.

CEO BACKGROUND

LEWIS B. CAMPBELL

Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer since February 1999 of Textron Inc., a multi-industry company serving the aircraft, industrial products and components and financial industries. Mr. Campbell is a member of The Business Council and The Business Roundtable where he serves on the Security Task Force and the International Trade and Investment Task Force. Age 61.

JAMES M. CORNELIUS

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of our company since February 11, 2008. Mr. Cornelius served as our Chief Executive Officer since September 12, 2006. From November 2005 through April 2006, Mr. Cornelius served as the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer (interim) of Guidant Corporation. He served as Guidant’s Non-Executive Chairman of the Board from 2000 until 2005. Mr. Cornelius is a Director of The DIRECTV Group and Given Imaging Ltd. Age 64.

LOUIS J. FREEH

President, Freeh Group International Solutions, LLC, a consulting firm, and Managing Partner, Freeh Sullivan Sporkin, LLP, a law firm, since 2007. Mr. Freeh served as Vice Chairman, General Counsel, Corporate Secretary and Ethics Officer to MBNA Corporation, a bank holding company, from 2001 until its acquisition by Bank of America in January 2006. He served as FBI Director from 1993 to 2001 and previously as a U.S. District Judge, Assistant U.S. Attorney and FBI Special Agent. Mr. Freeh is a Director of Fannie Mae, a shareholder-owned company that operates in the secondary mortgage market. Mr. Freeh serves as a Consultant for Daimler AG, formerly DaimlerChrysler AG, and E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. Age 58.

LAURIE H. GLIMCHER, M.D.

Irene Heinz Given Professor of Immunology at the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School since 1991. Dr. Glimcher is a Director of Waters Corporation. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institutes of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and the Irvington Institute Fellowship Committee. She sits on the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Board of Scientific Consultants and on the Scientific Advisory Boards of the Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, Center for Blood Research, Health Care Ventures, Inc., and Sandler Foundation Fund. Age 56.

MICHAEL GROBSTEIN

Retired Vice Chairman of Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm. Mr. Grobstein worked with Ernst & Young from 1964 to 1998, and was admitted as a partner in 1975. He served as a Vice Chairman-International Operations from 1993 to 1998, as Vice Chairman-Planning, Marketing and Industry Services from 1987 to 1993, and Vice Chairman-Accounting and Auditing Services from 1984 to 1987. He is a Director of Given Imaging Ltd. He serves on the Board of Trustees and Executive Committee of the Central Park Conservancy and on the Board of Directors of New Yorkers for Parks. Age 65.

LEIF JOHANSSON

President of AB Volvo and Chief Executive Officer of the Volvo Group, a global commercial transport equipment group, since 1997. Between 1979 and 1997, Mr. Johansson held various executive positions in AB Electrolux, a world leader in appliances, including serving as CEO between 1994 and 1997. He is a Director of Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget SCA, The Confederation of Swedish Enterprise, Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, the Association of Swedish Engineering Industries, ACEA and ACEA Commercial Vehicles. He is also a member of the European Business Roundtable of Industrialists. Age 56.

ALAN J. LACY

Senior Advisor to Oak Hill Capital Partners, L.P., a private equity investment firm, since 2007. From 1994 to 2006, he was employed by Sears, Roebuck and Co., a department store, and following its acquisition, Sears Holdings Corporation, a large broadline retailer. Mr. Lacy held executive level positions of increasing responsibility in finance and operations, including his service as Chief Executive Officer from 2000 to 2005. He also served as Vice Chairman from 2005 to 2006. He is a Director of The Western Union Company and serves on the advisory board of Fidelity Investments. He is also a Director of The Economic Club of Chicago and serves on the Board of Trustees of The Field Museum of Natural History and The National Parks Conservation Association. Age 54.

VICKI L. SATO, PH.D.

Professor of management practice at the Harvard Business School and Professor of molecular and cell biology at Harvard University since July 2005. In 2006, Dr. Sato became Special Advisor to Atlas Venture, a global venture capital firm. Dr. Sato retired as President of Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, a global biotechnology company, where she was responsible for research and development, business and corporate development, commercial operations, legal, and finance in 2005. Dr. Sato also served as Chief Scientific Officer, Senior Vice President of Research and Development, and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board at Vertex before being named President in 2000. She is a Director of PerkinElmer Corporation, Infinity Pharmaceuticals and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals. Age 59.



TOGO D. WEST, JR.

Chairman of TLI Leadership Group, a strategic consulting firm, since 2006 and Chairman of Noblis, Inc., a nonprofit science, technology and strategy organization, since 2001. From 2004 to 2006, Secretary West was the Chief Executive Officer of, and then consultant to, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, a nonprofit research and public policy institution. He served as Of Counsel to the Washington, D.C. based law firm of Covington & Burling from 2000 to 2004. Secretary West served as Secretary of the United States Department of Veteran Affairs from 1998 to 2000 and Secretary to the United States Army from 1993 to 1998. He is a Director of FuelCell Energy, Inc., Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and AbitibiBowater Inc. Age 65.

R. SANDERS WILLIAMS, M.D.

Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at Duke University Medical Center since 2007 and Dean of Duke University School of Medicine from 2001 to 2007. Dr. Williams joined the Duke faculty in 1980 as an assistant professor of medicine, physiology and cell biology. Dr. Williams is a Director of Laboratory Corporation of America, and is a Consultant to Phrixus, Inc. He has served recently on the Director’s Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health and the Board of External Advisors to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Age 59.

COMPENSATION

Executive Summary

2007 Financial Performance

Our executive compensation program is directly tied to the financial performance of our company. As described in more detail below, the Committee made pay decisions based on our financial performance for 2007 including:


•

The positive performance of our businesses in 2007, such as the achievement of non-GAAP diluted earnings per share 1 at 118% of target ($1.48 versus target of $1.25) and net sales achievement at 104% of target ($20.0 billion versus target of $19.3 billion);

•

The initial effects of our Productivity Transformation Initiative related to our transformation into a next-generation biopharmaceutical company; and


•

The impairment charge relating to our investment in certain auction rate securities.

Impact of New Strategy on Compensation Program

In connection with our strategy to transform into a next-generation biopharmaceutical company, we implemented several changes to our 2008 compensation program, including:


•

The use of a cash flow measure for determining annual incentives;


•

A special one-time performance share award for all executives which is tied to three-year productivity transformation goals; and


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The elimination of all perquisites for the highest level of executives who comprise our Management Council.

These actions, which are aligned with our three-year Productivity Transformation Initiative to reduce costs, streamline operations and rationalize global manufacturing, are discussed in more detail later in our CD&A.

Executive Compensation Philosophy

Our executive compensation philosophy is based on two core elements: to pay for performance and to provide a competitive compensation package. Each of these elements is described below.

Pay for Performance : We structure our compensation program to align the interests of our senior executives with the interests of our stockholders. We believe that an employee’s compensation should be tied directly to helping us achieve our mission and deliver value to our stockholders. Therefore, a significant part of each executive’s pay depends on his or her individual performance against financial and operational objectives as well as meeting key behavioral standards. We also believe that a significant amount of compensation should be at risk. A substantial portion of an executive’s compensation, therefore, is in the form of equity awards that tie the executive’s compensation directly to creating stockholder value and achieving financial and operational results.

Competitive Pay : We believe that a competitive compensation program is an important tool to help attract and retain talented employees capable of leading our business in the highly complex and competitive business environment in which we operate. We aim to pay our executives at approximately the median level of pay of our peer group when targeted levels of performance are achieved. By providing compensation that is competitive with our peer companies, we reduce the risk that our executives can be recruited away.

Our compensation program is also designed with the following principles in mind:


•

to pay our employees equitably relative to one another based on the work they do, the capabilities and experience they possess, and the performance they demonstrate;


•

to promote a non-discriminatory work environment that enables us to leverage the diversity of thought that comes with a diverse workforce;


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to motivate our executives to deliver high performance; and


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to continue to focus on good corporate governance practices by implementing compensation best practices and corporate policies, several of which are described in greater detail beginning on page 37.

Our Compensation Program Design

This section will explain how we determine the design of our executive compensation program. We believe our compensation program is reasonable and appropriate because it is aligned with our business goals to achieve our mission and deliver value to our stockholders.

Compensation and Management Development Committee

The Compensation and Management Development Committee (“Committee”) is responsible for providing oversight of our executive compensation program for the Named Executive Officers as well as other members of senior management. The Committee annually reviews and evaluates the executive compensation program to ensure that the program is aligned with our compensation philosophy. The “Committees of Our Board” section on page 7 discusses the duties and responsibilities of the Committee in more detail.

Compensation Consultant

The Committee has retained Mercer (US) Inc. as its compensation consultant since October of 2002. Mercer reports directly to the Committee and the Committee directly oversees the fees paid for services provided to the Committee. The Committee instructs Mercer to give advice to the Committee independent of management and to provide such advice for the benefit of our company and stockholders. Mercer assisted the Committee by providing the following services in 2007:


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Participated in the design and development of our executive compensation program;


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Provided competitive benchmarking and market data analysis;


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Provided recommendations for the compensation of our CEO and Named Executive Officers;


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Provided an annual review of our change-in-control benefits, including analyzing these benefits against our peer companies and best practices;


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Provided a competitive analysis of severance benefits for senior management and made recommendations for our Senior Executive Severance Plan;


•

Reviewed and advised on all materials provided to the Committee for discussion and approval; and


•

Attended all of the Committee’s regular meetings in 2007.

Our company divisions may retain Mercer consultants for discrete human resource services in the U.S. and abroad. The members of the Mercer consulting team giving advice to the Committee, however, may not provide any other service to our company. We engage in a competitive bidding process when selecting a company to provide human resource services to our divisions. If Mercer wishes to provide such services, it must bid on the services, along with other viable competitors. Through this bidding process, our company divisions have selected, from time to time, consultants other than Mercer to perform human resource services. The Committee annually reviews the overall fees incurred by the Committee and the fees incurred by company divisions for services provided by Mercer. In addition, Mercer follows rigorous internal guidelines and practices to guard against any conflict and to ensure the objectivity of their advice. The Committee regularly reviews these guidelines and practices and believes that the services Mercer provides to company divisions do not impact the advice Mercer provides to the Committee on executive compensation matters.

Role of Company Management

The CEO makes recommendations to the Committee concerning the compensation of the other Named Executive Officers and other senior management. In addition, the CEO and CFO are involved in setting the business goals that are used as the performance goals for the annual and long-term incentive plans, subject to Committee approval. The Senior Vice President of Human Resources works closely with the Committee, Mercer and management to (i) ensure that the Committee is provided with the appropriate information to make its decisions, (ii) propose recommendations for Committee consideration and (iii) communicate those decisions to management for implementation.

Peer Group Analysis

Our executive compensation program seeks to provide total compensation, when targeted levels of performance are achieved, at the median of the pay levels provided by a designated peer group of U.S. companies. Specifically, we target the competitive pay median on two levels: total cash compensation (base salary plus annual target bonus) and total direct compensation (total cash compensation plus the value of long-term incentives). We use competitive median pay levels to maintain our compensation program guidelines on an annual basis (i.e., our salary structure, the leveling of our positions, our annual target bonus levels, and our long-term incentive award guidelines). We also use competitive pay levels to help in determining individual pay decisions (i.e., base salary levels, the size of salary adjustments, and the size of long-term incentive awards). Paying at the competitive median when targeted levels of performance are achieved allows us to attract and retain the talent we need to run the business while also enabling us to maintain a competitive cost base with respect to compensation expense.

We believe this peer group is appropriate given the unique nature of the pharmaceutical/biotechnol ogy industry. We note that the companies in our peer group vary in size, but we do not believe that company size should be a primary factor in determining our peer group. Instead, we believe emphasis should be placed on whether a company competes directly with us for unique pharmaceutical/biotechnol ogy talent. The companies in our peer group represent our primary competitors for executive talent and operate in a similarly-complex regulatory and research-driven environment. We monitor the composition of our peer group regularly and will make changes when appropriate. For example, we added Amgen to our peer group when Amgen established a prominent presence in the industry and became a competitor for talent. We believe it is critical to pay at a competitive level relative to this peer group in order to attract and retain the talent we need; therefore, we target Named Executive Officers’ compensation at the median of our peer group.

Mercer annually conducts a review of the compensation for our Named Executive Officers using compensation information compiled from the proxy statement disclosures of our peer group. Non-U.S. peer companies have historically been excluded from our compensation reviews because the compensation information for these companies is not as readily available.

The Components of our 2007 Compensation Program

The main components of our executive compensation program are:


•

Base Salary


•

Annual Incentive Award


•

Long-Term Incentives


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Long-Term Performance Awards
•

Stock Options
•

Restricted Stock Units

This target mix supports the core elements of our executive compensation philosophy by emphasizing long-term incentives while providing competitive short-term components. Below, we explain how each of these components is set and describe certain changes we made to these components in 2007. The changes noted were implemented to provide for the continued alignment of our compensation program with the core elements of our compensation philosophy. The specific pay decisions with respect to the Named Executive Officers are detailed in the next section.

Base Salary —Base salaries are a tool used both to keep us competitive and help us retain talent. The base salaries of our executives are set based primarily upon the pay levels of comparable positions within our peer group and the unique qualifications and experience of the individual executives. Merit increases for our executives are determined based upon both the performance of an individual and the size of our merit increase budget in a given year. We review results of surveys that forecast what other companies’ salary increase budgets will be. We typically set our annual salary increase budgets based upon the median of such forecasts. Salary adjustments are also typically granted when executives assume significant increases in responsibility.

Annual Incentives —Annual incentive awards are designed to reward the Named Executive Officers for achieving short-term financial and operational goals and to reward their individual performance, consistent with our pay for performance philosophy. A Named Executive Officer’s annual incentive award opportunity is a percentage of his/her base salary as determined by the individual’s job level.

In 2007, we established that the financial portion of the annual incentive program would be based on performance against targeted non-GAAP diluted earnings per share. In prior years, the financial portion was based on non-GAAP pre-tax earnings. We made this change because the earnings per share measure more closely aligns annual incentive payouts with the creation of stockholder value. If actual non-GAAP diluted earnings per share do not reach a targeted minimum threshold level, no award payments will be made.

Additionally, in 2007, because total direct compensation for our senior executives was below the median of our peer group, annual incentive targets were increased for our senior executives (except for our CEO), by 10 percentage points. This action enabled us to bring the total cash compensation of these executives to approximately the competitive median.

Long-Term Incentives —Long-term incentives are designed to tie executive interests to the interests of our stockholders. The ultimate value of long-term awards is driven by stock price, which provides a direct link to the creation of stockholder value. In addition, our long-term incentive program is designed to reward individual performance. We offer three long-term award vehicles, each of which serves a different purpose.


•

Long-Term Performance Awards to reward the achievement of internal financial goals;

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Stock Option Awards to reward the creation of incremental stockholder value; and


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Restricted Stock Unit Awards to help us retain key talent.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

About the Company

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (BMS, the Company or Bristol-Myers Squibb) is a global biopharmaceutical and related health care products company whose mission is to extend and enhance human life by providing the highest quality pharmaceutical and related health care products. The Company is engaged in the discovery, development, licensing, manufacturing, marketing, distribution and sale of pharmaceuticals and related health care products.

The Company has three reportable segments—Pharmaceuticals, Nutritionals and ConvaTec. The Pharmaceuticals segment consists of the global pharmaceutical/biotechnol ogy and international consumer medicines business, which accounted for approximately 81% of the Company’s 2007 net sales. The Nutritionals segment consists of Mead Johnson Nutritionals (Mead Johnson), primarily an infant formula and children’s nutritionals business, which accounted for approximately 13% of the Company’s 2007 net sales. The ConvaTec segment consists of ostomy, wound and skin care business, which accounted for approximately 6% of the Company’s 2007 net sales and was previously included in the Other Health Care operating segment. In January 2008, the Company completed the sale of its Medical Imaging business to Avista Capital Partners L.P. (Avista). The results of the Medical Imaging business, previously included in the former Other Health Care operating segment, are presented as part of the Company’s results from discontinued operations.

2007 Financial Highlights

Worldwide net sales from continuing operations for 2007 increased 12% to $19.3 billion compared to 2006. PLAVIX* (clopidogrel bisulfate) sales grew 46%, primarily reflecting the adverse impact of generic competition from August 2006 to mid-2007, as well as strong underlying sales growth. The other key products within the Company’s Pharmaceuticals segment, including AVAPRO*/AVALIDE* (irbesartan/irbesartan-hy drochlorothiazide), REYATAZ (atazanavir sulfate), the SUSTIVA (efavirenz) Franchise and ABILIFY* (aripiprazole) experienced double digit sales growth for the year. Sales of the Company’s newer specialty and biologics medicines BARACLUDE (entecavir), ORENCIA (abatacept) and SPRYCEL (dasatinib) continue to be strong. In addition, the Company launched IXEMPRA (ixabepilone) for the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer. Overall worldwide sales growth, however, was moderated by a significant decline in PRAVACHOL (pravastatin sodium) sales due to generic competition.

Net earnings from continuing operations were $2.0 billion in 2007 compared with $1.4 billion in 2006. The 2007 results include a $230 million charge for acquired in-process research and development related to the purchase of Adnexus Therapeutics, Inc. (Adnexus), a $292 million charge in connection with the Company’s three-year Productivity Transformation Initiative (PTI) and a $275 million impairment charge of the Company’s investment in certain auction rate securities (ARS). The 2006 results include a $353 million increase in reserves for a pricing and sales litigation settlement and $220 million in early debt retirement costs. Additionally, the Company also recorded gains on sale of product assets and properties of $273 million and $200 million in 2007 and 2006, respectively.

In December 2007, the Company announced that the Board of Directors (the Board) declared an 11 percent dividend increase, the first increase since 2002. The dividend increase will result in a quarterly dividend of thirty-one cents ($.31) per share on the Company’s Common Stock for an indicative dividend for the full year of 2008 of $1.24 per share, subject to the normal quarterly review by the Board.

Business Environment

The Company conducts its business primarily within the pharmaceutical/biotechnol ogy industry, which is highly competitive and subject to numerous government regulations. Many competitive factors may significantly affect the Company’s sales of its products, including product efficacy, safety, price and cost-effectiveness, marketing effectiveness, product labeling, quality control and quality assurance of its manufacturing operations, and research and development of new products. To successfully compete for business in the health care industry, the Company must demonstrate that its products offer medical benefits, as well as cost advantages. Currently, most of the Company’s new product introductions compete with other products already on the market in the same therapeutic category, in addition to potential competition of new products that competitors may introduce in the future. The Company manufactures branded products, which are priced higher than generic products. Generic competition is one of the Company’s leading challenges globally.

In the pharmaceutical/biotechnol ogy industry, the majority of an innovative product’s commercial value is usually realized during the period that the product has market exclusivity. When a product loses exclusivity, it is no longer protected by a patent and is on key and new growth products, which include PLAVIX*, ABILIFY*, AVAPRO*/AVALIDE*, REYATAZ, the SUSTIVA Franchise, ERBITUX* (cetuximab), ORENCIA, BARACLUDE, SPRYCEL and IXEMPRA. The Company experienced the last of a series of major anticipated exclusivity losses in 2006 and does not expect any significant new exclusivity losses for the next several years.

In order to support the production of specialty products in the pharmaceutical portfolio, including biologics, the Company completed a land purchase in 2007 of an 89-acre site to locate its new large-scale, expandable multi-project bulk biologics manufacturing facility in Devens, Massachusetts. The Company has committed $750 million to fund the construction of the facility which began in May 2007. The facility is projected to be operationally complete in 2009, and the Company plans to submit the site for regulatory approval in 2010. Commercial production of biologic compounds is anticipated to begin in 2011. In addition, the Company expanded its Manati, Puerto Rico facility, with the expansion targeted for start-up in 2008.

The new state-of-the-art facility, as well as the expanded Manati, Puerto Rico facility, will support the filling and finishing of the Company’s sterile products and biologic compounds, including ORENCIA, the Company’s first internally discovered and developed biologic medicine, and commercial quantities of compounds currently in development should those compounds receive regulatory approval.

In keeping with its strategy, the Company invested $3.3 billion in research and development, representing a 10% growth rate over 2006. Research and development dedicated to pharmaceutical products, including milestone payments for in-licensing and development programs, was $3.1 billion compared to $2.8 billion in 2006.

Consistent with the Company’s objective to maximize the value of its non-pharmaceutical businesses, in January 2008, the Company completed the sale of its Medical Imaging business to Avista. The Company will continue to seek opportunities to maximize the value of its remaining Health Care Group businesses.

As it transitions into a next-generation biopharmaceutical company, the Company seeks to reallocate resources to enable strategic acquisitions, such as the acquisition of Adnexus in October 2007, as well as pursue partnerships and other collaborative arrangements, such as the worldwide alliance with AstraZeneca PLC (AstraZeneca) to discover, develop and commercialize saxagliptin and dapagliflozin and the two separate agreements with Pfizer Inc. (Pfizer) for the research, development and commercialization of a Pfizer discovery program and for the development and commercialization of apixaban.

Productivity Transformation Initiative

The Company undertook a broad range of actions in the fourth quarter of 2007 as part of the previously announced three-year PTI, which is reducing costs, streamlining operations and rationalizing global manufacturing. The initiative, which is on track to achieve $1.5 billion in annual cost savings and cost avoidance on a pre-tax basis by 2010, is central to the Company’s strategy to become a more nimble and flexible next generation biopharmaceutical enterprise.

Key productivity initiatives include reducing general and administrative operations by simplifying, standardizing and outsourcing, where appropriate, processes and services, rationalizing the Company’s mature brands portfolio, consolidating its global manufacturing network while eliminating complexity and enhancing profitability, simplifying its geographic footprint and implementing a more efficient go-to-market model. Specific productivity goals include reducing the number of brands in the Company’s mature products portfolio by 60 percent between 2007 and 2011, reducing the number of manufacturing facilities by more than 50 percent by the end of 2010, and reducing total headcount by approximately 10 percent between 2007 and 2010. Some positions have been eliminated in 2007, although the substantial majority of positions will be eliminated in 2008 and 2009. Among the many productivity activities across the entire organization in the fourth quarter of 2007 are the impending closure of several manufacturing facilities, including Mayaguez, Puerto Rico and Barceloneta, Puerto Rico.

Costs associated with the implementation of the PTI are estimated to be between $0.9 billion to $1.1 billion on a pre-tax basis, with $292 million incurred in 2007 and approximately $500 million expected to be incurred in 2008. The ultimate timing of the recording of the charges cannot be predicted with certainty and will be affected by the occurrence of triggering events for expense recognition under U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), among other factors.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussions of the Company’s results of continuing operations exclude the results related to the Medical Imaging business, which was previously presented as a component of the former Other Health Care operating segment prior to its divestiture in January 2008, and the Oncology Therapeutics Network (OTN) business, which was previously presented as a separate operating segment prior to its divestiture in 2005. These businesses have been segregated from continuing operations and reflected as discontinued operations for all periods presented. See “—Discontinued Operations” below.

Net Sales

Net sales from continuing operations for 2007 increased 12% to $19.3 billion, including a 3% favorable foreign exchange impact, compared to 2006. U.S. net sales in 2007 increased 18% to $10.8 billion compared to 2006. International net sales in 2007 increased 5% to $8.5 billion compared to 2006, including a 7% favorable foreign exchange impact.

In 2006, net sales from continuing operations decreased 7% to $17.3 billion, compared to 2005. U.S. net sales in 2006 decreased 8% to $9.2 billion compared to 2005, while international net sales decreased 7% to $8.1 billion in 2006 as compared to 2005.

In general, the Company’s business is not seasonal. For information on U.S. pharmaceutical prescriber demand, reference is made to the table within Business Segments under the Pharmaceuticals section below, which sets forth a comparison of changes in net sales to the estimated total prescription growth (for both retail and mail order customers) for certain of the Company’s key pharmaceutical products and new products sold by the U.S. Pharmaceuticals business.

The Company operates in three reportable segments—Pharmaceuticals, Nutritionals and ConvaTec (previously a component of the Other Health Care operating segment). In January 2008, the Company completed the sale to Avista of the Medical Imaging business, which was previously presented as a component of the Other Health Care operating segment. In May 2005, the Company completed the sale of OTN, which was previously presented as a separate operating segment. As such, the results of operations for Medical Imaging and OTN are presented as part of the Company’s results from discontinued operations in accordance with Statement of Financial Standards (SFAS) No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets. Accordingly, Medical Imaging and OTN results of operations in prior periods have been reclassified to discontinued operations to conform with current year presentations.

The Company recognizes revenue net of various sales adjustments to arrive at net sales as reported on the Consolidated Statement of Earnings. These adjustments are referred to as gross-to-net sales adjustments and are further described in “—Critical Accounting Policies” below.

The slight decrease in gross-to-net sales adjustments in 2007 compared to 2006 was affected by a number of factors. Sales returns decreased primarily due to higher accruals in 2006 for Cardiovascular non-exclusive brands and from the discontinued commercialization of TEQUIN (gatifloxacin). The decrease in prime vendor charge-backs was primarily due to lower sales of TAXOL ® (paclitaxel) as a result of loss of exclusivity. This was partially offset by increases in managed health care rebates and other contract discounts, primarily as a result of higher PLAVIX* sales and the reversal of reserves in 2006 related to the TRICARE Retail Pharmacy Refund Program, partially offset by lower sales of PRAVACHOL due to loss of exclusivity. Additionally, the increase in cash discounts was primarily due to higher PLAVIX* sales volumes.

The decrease in gross-to-net sales adjustments in 2006 compared to 2005 was affected by a number of factors, including changes in customer mix and a portfolio shift, in each case towards products that required lower rebates, as well as changes in contract status. The decrease in prime vendor charge-backs was primarily the result of lower PLAVIX* net sales, volume erosion on highly-rebated PARAPLATIN (carboplatin) and TAXOL ® (paclitaxel) due to generic competition, as well as the impact from the discontinued commercialization of TEQUIN. Managed health care rebates and other contract discounts decreased primarily as a result of the reversal of reserves related to the TRICARE Retail Pharmacy Refund Program, as well as the exclusivity loss of PRAVACHOL, which also reduced Medicaid rebates. In addition, lower PLAVIX* net sales and the shift in patient enrollment from Medicaid to Medicare under Medicare Part D, resulted in a decrease in Medicaid rebates, partially offset by a corresponding increase in managed health care rebates. The decrease in cash discounts was primarily due to lower sales of PRAVACHOL due to loss of exclusivity and lower PLAVIX* sales volumes. The increase in sales returns was primarily due to higher returns trends for non-exclusive brands as well as from the discontinued commercialization of TEQUIN.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

Three Months Results of Operations

First quarter 2008 net sales from continuing operations increased 20% to $5,181 million, including a 5% favorable foreign exchange impact, compared to the same period in 2007, driven by increased Pharmaceuticals net sales, which totaled $4,188 million in the first quarter of 2008. The sales growth was also estimated to be 6% favorably impacted by the residual sales of generic clopidogrel bisulfate in the first quarter of 2007, after which time the generic inventory in the distribution channels was substantially depleted.

U.S. net sales increased 23% to $2,913 million for the first quarter 2008 compared to the same period in 2007, primarily due to the continued growth of ABILIFY* and increased sales of PLAVIX*, as well as other key products. International net sales increased 16% to $2,268 million, including a 12% favorable foreign exchange impact.

In general, the Company’s business is not seasonal. For information on U.S. pharmaceutical prescriber demand, reference is made to the table within Business Segments under the Pharmaceuticals section below, which sets forth a comparison of changes in net sales to the estimated total prescription growth (for both retail and mail order customers) for certain of the Company’s key pharmaceutical products sold by the U.S. Pharmaceuticals business.

The Company recognizes revenue net of various sales adjustments to arrive at net sales as reported on the Consolidated Statement of Earnings. These adjustments are referred to as gross-to-net sales adjustments.

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