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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (09-12-11 01:21 AM)

Description

Equus Total Return. Executive Chairman Alessandro Benedetti bought 400000 shares on 9-02-2011 at $ 2.75

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Significant Developments

Our Board of Directors (sometimes referred to as the “Board”) and management of the Fund (“Management”) continue to believe that current market conditions and recent portfolio performance dictate the need to pursue a more active role in the management of these investments and to seek liquidity events at the appropriate time to protect and enhance shareholder value. These activities include continuous monitoring and intensive reviews of portfolio company performance and expectations, providing follow-on capital when necessary, exploration of liquidity events for certain portfolio companies to position the Fund to maximize investment returns, and actively pursuing suitable new investments for the Fund.

On November 1, 2010 , we announced that our Board of Directors had approved the terms of a non-transferable rights offering to our shareholders to purchase shares of our common stock. We intend to issue to stockholders of record non-transferable rights to subscribe for an aggregate of up to 2,953,882 shares of the Fund's common stock.

On June 9, 2010, we announced the appointment of John A. Hardy as Executive Chairman, Robert L. Knauss as Non-Executive Chairman, and Fraser Atkinson as Chairman of the Fund’s Audit Committee. The summary biographies of these individuals may be found on the Fund’s website at www.equuscap.com or in the Fund’s annual proxy statement to be sent to shareholders subsequent to the filing of this report on Form 10-K.

On May 12, 2010, our shareholders elected four new members to our Board, each of whom had no prior connection with the Fund. The results of this election were certified on May 20, 2011. These four individuals have sound finance and investment management backgrounds, execution and management expertise, access to deal flow across diverse industries around the world, and strength in global capital markets.

During 2010 and continuing into 2011, we sold certain of the Fund’s investment holdings for cash in an effort to enhance the Fund’s liquidity and position the Fund for future growth.

During 2009, we executed a management internalization strategy initiated to enhance liquidity, achieve a lower operational cost structure, provide more assistance to portfolio companies and continue to provide enhanced communication with shareholders. We believe these actions are necessary to protect capital and liquidity in order to preserve and enhance shareholder value.

Investment Objective

Our investment objective is to maximize the total return to our stockholders in the form of current investment income and long-term capital gains by investing in the debt and equity securities of small and middle market capitalization companies that are generally not publicly traded at the time of our investment. As we grow and develop the Fund, we intend to include investments in progressively larger enterprises.

Investment Strategy

Beginning in 2006, we implemented a revised investment strategy to attempt to strike a balance between the potential for gain and the risk of loss. With respect to capital appreciation, Equus is a “growth-at-reasonable-pri ce” investor that seeks to identify and acquire securities that meet our criteria for selling at reasonable prices. We give priority to cash producing investments wherein we invest principally in debt or preferred equity financing with the objective of generating regular interest and dividend income back to the Fund. Debt and preferred equity financing may also be used to create long-term capital appreciation through the exercise and sale of warrants received in connection with the financing. Given market conditions over the past several years and the performance of our portfolio, our Management and board of directors believe it prudent to continue to review alternatives to refine and further clarify the current strategies.

Investment Criteria

Consistent with our investment objective and strategy, Management evaluates prospective investments based upon the criteria set forth below. We may modify some or all of these criteria from time to time.



•

Management Competency and Ownership . We seek to invest in companies with experienced management teams who have demonstrated a track record of successful performance. Further, we desire to invest in companies with significant management ownership. We believe that significant management ownership in small capitalization and middle market companies provides appropriate incentives and an alignment of interests for management to maximize shareholder value. In addition, we will seek to design compensation and incentive arrangements that align the interests of the portfolio company’s management with those of the Fund to enhance potential returns.



•

Substantial Target Market . We desire to focus on companies whose products or services have favorable growth potential and strong competitive positions in their respective markets. These positions may be as leadership positions within a given industry or market niche positions in which the product or service has a demonstrated competitive advantage. The market in which a potential portfolio company operates should either be sizeable or have significant growth potential.



•

History of Profitability and Favorable Growth Potential . We target companies that have demonstrated a history of profitability or a reasonable expectation of a return to profitability in the near future.



•

Ability to Provide Regular Cash Interest and Distributions . We look for companies with strong cash flow models sufficient to provide regular and consistent interest and/or preferred dividend payments.



•

Management Assistance and Substantial Equity . Given the requirements of a BDC under the 1940 Act, we seek to invest in companies that will permit substantial managerial assistance including representation on the board of directors of the company. With regard to equity investments, we desire to obtain a substantial investment position in portfolio companies. This position may be as a minority shareholder with certain contractual rights and powers, or as a majority shareholder, and should otherwise allow us to have substantive input on the direction and strategies of the portfolio company.


•

Plausible Exit and Potential for Appreciation . Prior to investing in a portfolio company, we will seek to analyze potential exit strategies and pursue those investments with such strategies as may be achievable.

Investment Operations

Our investment operations consist principally of the following basic activities:

Investment Selection. We expect that many of our investment opportunities will come from management, members of our Board, other private equity investors, direct approaches from prospective portfolio companies and referrals from investment banks, business brokers, commercial, regional and local banks, attorneys, accountants and other members of the financial community. Subject to the approval of our Board, we may compensate certain referrals with finder’s fees to the extent permissible under applicable law and consistent with industry practice.

Due Diligence. Once a potential investment is identified, we undertake a due diligence review using information provided by the prospective portfolio companies and publicly available information. Management may also seek input from consultants, investment bankers and other knowledgeable sources. The due diligence review will typically include, but is not limited to:



•

Review of historical and prospective financial information including audits and budgets;



•

On-site visits;



•

Review of business plans and an analysis of the consistency of operations with those plans;



•

Interviews with management, employees, customers and vendors of the potential portfolio company;



•

Review of existing loan documents, if any;



•

Background checks on members of management; and



•

Research relating to the company, its management, industry, markets, products and services and competitors.

Structuring Investments. We typically negotiate investments in private transactions directly with the owner or issuer of the securities acquired. Management structures the terms of a proposed investment, including the purchase price, the type of security to be purchased and our future involvement in the portfolio company’s business. We seek to structure the terms of the investment to provide for the capital needs of the portfolio company while maximizing our opportunities for current income and capital appreciation. In addition, we may invest with other co-investors including private equity firms, business development companies, small business investment companies, venture capital groups, institutional investors and individual investors.

Providing Management Assistance and Monitoring of Investments. Successful private equity investments typically require active monitoring of, and significant participation in, major business decisions of portfolio companies. In many cases, officers and directors of the Fund serve as members of the boards of directors of portfolio companies. Such management assistance is required of a business development company under the 1940 Act. We seek to provide guidance and management assistance with respect to such matters as capital structure, acquisitions, budgets, profit goals, corporate strategy, portfolio management and potential sale of the company or other exit strategies. In connection with their service as directors of portfolio companies, officers and directors of the Fund may receive and retain directors’ fees or reimbursement for expenses incurred, and may participate in incentive stock option plans for non-employee directors, if any. When necessary and as requested by any portfolio company, Management, on behalf of the Fund, may also assign staff professionals with financial or management expertise to assist portfolio company management.

Follow-On Investments

Following our initial investment, a portfolio company may request that we make follow-on investments by providing additional equity or loans needed to fully implement our business plans to develop a new line of business or to recover from unexpected business problems or other purposes. In addition, follow-on investments may be made to exercise warrants or other preferential rights granted to the Fund or otherwise to increase its position in a portfolio company. We may make follow-on investments in portfolio companies from cash on hand or borrow all or a portion of the funds required. If we are unable to make follow-on investments due to lack of available capital, the portfolio company in need of the investment may be negatively impacted and our equity interest in the portfolio company may be diluted if outside equity capital is required.

Disposition of Investments

The method and timing of the disposition of our investments in portfolio companies are critical to our ability to realize capital gains and minimize capital losses. We may dispose of our portfolio securities through a variety of transactions, including recapitalizations, refinancings, management buy-outs, repayments from cash flow, acquisitions of portfolio companies by a third party and outright sales of the Fund’s securities in a portfolio company. In addition, we may distribute our portfolio securities in-kind to our stockholders. In structuring our investments, we endeavor to reach an understanding with the management of the prospective portfolio company as to the appropriate method and timing of the disposition of the investment. In some cases, we seek registration rights for our portfolio securities at the time of investment which typically provide that the portfolio company will bear the cost of registration. To the extent not paid by the portfolio company, the Fund typically bears the costs of disposing of its portfolio investments.

Current Portfolio Companies

For a description of our current portfolio company investments, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations–Portfolio Investments.”

Valuation

On at least a quarterly basis, Management values our portfolio investments. These valuations are subject to the approval and adoption of the Board. Valuations of our portfolio securities at “fair value” are performed in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).

The fair value of investments for which no market exists (including most of the Fund’s investments) is determined through procedures established in good faith by the Board. As a general principle, the current “fair value” of an investment is the amount the Fund might reasonably expect to receive upon its sale in an orderly manner. There are a range of values that are reasonable for such investments at any particular time.

Generally, the Fund will utilize the original investment amount to determine fair value until a significant development affecting the portfolio company (such as updated financial results or a change in general market conditions) provides a basis for an adjustment to the valuation. The Fund bases adjustments upon such factors as the portfolio company’s earnings, cash flow and net worth, the market prices for similar securities of comparable companies, an assessment of the company’s current and future financial prospects and various other factors and assumptions. In the case of unsuccessful operations, the Fund may base a portfolio company’s fair value upon the company’s estimated liquidation value. Fair valuations are necessarily subjective, and management’s estimate of fair value may differ materially from amounts actually received upon the disposition of its portfolio securities. Also, any failure by a portfolio company to achieve its business plan or obtain and maintain its financing arrangements could result in increased volatility and result in a significant and rapid change in its value.

We may also use, when available, third-party transactions in a portfolio company’s securities as the basis for our valuation. We use this method only with respect to completed transactions or firm offers made by sophisticated, independent investors. The Board did not retain independent valuation firms for the valuations at December 31, 2010.

To the extent that market quotations are readily available for our investments and such investments are freely transferable, we value them at the closing market price on the date of valuation. For securities which are of the same class as a class of public securities but are restricted from free trading (such as Rule 144 stock), we establish our valuation by discounting the closing market price to reflect the estimated impact of illiquidity caused by such restriction. We generally hold investments in debt securities to maturity. Accordingly, we determine the fair value of debt securities on the basis of the terms of the debt securities and the financial condition of the issuer. We value certificates of deposit at their face value, plus interest accrued to the date of valuation

Our Board reviews the valuation policies on a quarterly basis to determine their appropriateness and reserves the right to hire and from time to time utilizes independent valuation firms to review Management’s valuation methodology or to conduct an independent valuation.

On a daily basis, we adjust net asset value for changes in the value of publicly held securities, if any, and for material changes in the value of investments in securities issued by private companies. We report these amounts to Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. Weekly, and our daily net asset values appear in various publications, including Barron’s and The Wall Street Journal.

Competition

We compete with a large number of public and private equity and mezzanine funds and other financing sources, including traditional financial services companies such as finance companies and commercial banks. Many of our competitors are substantially larger and have considerably greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we do. Our competitors may have a lower cost of funds and many have access to funding sources that are not available to us. In addition, certain of our competitors may have higher risk tolerances or different risk assessments, which could allow them to consider a wider variety of investments and establish more relationships and build their market shares. In addition, many of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions that the 1940 Act imposes on us as a business development company.

There is no assurance that the competitive pressures we face will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, because of this competition, we may not be able to take advantage of attractive investment opportunities and may not be able to identify and make investments that satisfy our investment objectives or meet our investment goals.

CEO BACKGROUND

Fraser Atkinson
355 Burrard St., Ste. 910
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Age: 52

None

None

CFO of Versatile Systems Inc. (“Versatile”) (technology consulting) since February 2003, Corporate Secretary of Versatile since October 2003 and Director since November 2003. Mr. Atkinson was involved in both the technology and corporate finance sectors as a partner at KPMG, LLP for over 14 years, having left the firm in September 2002.

None

Alessandro Benedetti
355 Burrard St., Ste. 910
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Age : 48

None

None

Mr. Benedetti is currently the CEO of SAE Capital Ltd., which he founded in January 2007. Prior to that, he was the CEO of SAE Capital SPA, based in Rome, Italy. Over the last 20 years Mr. Benedetti has been involved in the structuring and financing of complex transactions, acting on behalf of companies and governments in North America, Europe, Central Asia and the Middle East. In 2005, he structured and led the acquisition of Wind Telecomunicazioni SpA, based in Italy, which had 16 million wireless subscribers, 1.6 million fixed line customers and 28 million registered internet users. At that time the transaction was the largest leveraged buyout in European history, in a deal valued at over 12 billion Euros.

Richard F. Bergner
Eight Greenway Plaza
Suite 930
Houston, Texas 77046
Age: 79

Director

Term expires
2010;
Director
since 2005.

Practicing attorney in Houston, TX for 50 years. Mr. Bergner’s practice includes corporate, investment and real estate issues; he has litigated cases in federal and state court.

None

Gregory J. Flanagan
Eight Greenway Plaza
Suite 930
Houston, Texas 77046
Age: 64

Director

Term expires
2010;
Director
since 1992.

Chairman of the Board, CEO and President of the Fund from July 2009 to February 2010. COO of Gallagher Healthcare, Inc. – Houston Branch (insurance brokerage) from 2003 to 2008. Mr. Flanagan also has more than 20 years of commercial banking experience.

None

Henry W. Hankinson
4355 Cobb Parkway
Suite 501 J
Atlanta, Georgia 30339
Age: 68

Director

Term expires
2010;
Director
since 2005.

Managing Partner and co-founder of Global Business Associates, LLC, a boutique M&A consulting firm in Atlanta, GA. Mr. Hankinson is a former military officer with engineering and MBA degrees. He has held domestic and international senior executive management positions for over 30 years. In 1993 he moved to Moscow as the senior regional executive for Halliburton / Brown & Root (“HBR”) to establish the oil & gas construction market in the Former Soviet Union. In 1997 he moved to Riyadh, as the senior HBR regional Managing Director of Saudi Arabia. In 1999 he was recruited to become the COO and senior American for a large multi-national conglomerate for the Saudi Royal Family. Based in Riyadh, he was responsible for investment acquisitions and portfolio management. During his career, Mr. Hankinson has served as Chairman, CEO, COO, and Director for both small and multi-national private and public companies.

None

John A. Hardy
355 Burrard St., Ste. 910
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Age: 58

None

None

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Versatile Systems Inc. (“Versatile”) (technology consulting) since January 1997. Mr. Hardy has had extensive experience in the insurance, finance and banking sectors, as well as mergers and acquisitions and litigation and resolution of multi-jurisdictional disputes practicing as a Barrister from 1978-1997. Mr. Hardy was also an adjunct Professor lecturing in insurance law at the University of British Columbia from 1984-2000.

Robert L. Knauss
P.O. Box 40
5580 FM 1697
Burton, Texas 77835
Age: 79

Director

Term expires
2010; Director
since 1991.

Chairman of the Board of Philip Services Corp. (industrial services) from 1998 to 2003, and Chairman of the Board and CEO of Baltic International USA, Inc. from 1995 to 2003. During the past twenty years, Mr. Knauss has served on the Boards of Directors of eight public companies. Mr. Knauss was the former Dean and Distinguished University Professor of University of Houston Law School and was also Dean of Vanderbilt Law School.

The Mexico Fund, Inc. (investment company), XO Holdings, Inc. (telecommunications) and WestPoint International Inc. (home products).

Bertrand des Pallieres
355 Burrard St., Ste. 910
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C 2G8
Age: 43

None

None

CEO of SPQR Capital LLP, based in London, UK since May 2007; Global Head of Principal Finance and member of the Global Market Leadership Group of Deutsche Bank from 2005 to 2007; from 1992 to 2005, he held various positions at JP Morgan including Global Head of Structured Credit, European Head of Derivatives Structuring and Marketing and Co-head of sales for Europe Middle East and Africa.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

Overview
Equus is a BDC that provides financing solutions for privately held middle market and small capitalization companies. We began operations in 1983 and have been a publicly traded closed-end fund since 1991. Our investment objective is to seek the highest total return, consisting of capital appreciation and current income.

In June 2005, we retained Moore Clayton Capital Advisors, Inc. (“MCCA”) as our registered investment adviser to manage our portfolio and provide access to investment opportunities. Our investment advisory agreement with MCCA terminated on June 30, 2009 and we have since internalized the management of the Fund. We now directly employ our management team and incur the costs and expenses associated with Fund operations. There is no outside investment advisory organization providing services to us under a fee-based advisory agreement, or an administrative organization charging us for services rendered. We expect that, because of management internalization, certain expenses of the Fund will not increase commensurate with an increase in the size of the Fund and, therefore, we can achieve efficiencies in our cost structure if we are able to grow the Fund.

As a BDC, we are required to comply with certain regulatory requirements. For instance, we generally have to invest at least 70% of the Fund’s total assets in “qualifying assets,” including securities of private U.S. companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and short-term high-quality debt investments. Equus is a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code. To qualify as a RIC, we must meet certain source of income and asset diversification requirements. If we comply with the provisions of Subchapter M, the Fund generally does not have to pay corporate-level income taxes on any income that distributed to our stockholders.


Investment Income. We generate investment income from interest payable on the debt securities that the Fund holds, dividends received on equity interests in our portfolio companies and capital gains, if any, realized upon sales of equity and, to a lesser extent, debt securities in the investment portfolio. Our equity investments may include shares of common and preferred stock, membership interests in limited liability companies and warrants to purchase additional equity interests. These equity securities may or may not pay dividends, and the exercise prices of warrants that we acquire in connection with debt investments, if any, vary by investment. Our debt investments in portfolio companies may be in the form of senior or subordinated loans and may be unsecured or have a first or second lien on some or all of the assets of the borrower. Our loans typically have a term of three to seven years and bear interest at fixed or floating rates. Interest on these debt securities is generally payable either quarterly or semiannually. Some promissory notes held by the Fund provide that a portfolio company may elect to pay interest in cash or provide that discount interest may accrete in the form of original issue discount or payment-in-kind (PIK) over the life of the notes by adding unpaid interest amounts to the principal balance. Amortization of principal on our debt investments is generally deferred for several years from the date of initial investment. The principal amount of these debt securities and any accrued but unpaid interest generally will become due at maturity. We also earn interest income at market rates on investments in short-term marketable securities. From time to time, we generate income from time to time in the form of commitment, origination and structuring fees in connection with our investments. We recognize all such fees when earned.

Expenses. Currently, our primary operating expenses consist of professional fees, compensation expense, and general and administrative fees. During 2010, professional fees and other expenses incidental to our annual meeting and proxy contest were $0.8 million. Prior to the internalization described above, our primary operating expenses consisted of investment advisory and management fees payable to MCCA for its work in identifying, evaluating, negotiating, closing and monitoring investments. MCCA provided us with the services of its investment professionals and our former administrator, Equus Capital Administration Company, Inc. (“ECAC”) provided us the services of its administrative staff as well as its investment professionals. MCCA also provided and paid for the management services necessary to run the Fund’s business. Under the Advisory Agreement between MCCA and the Fund, MCCA received a management fee equal to an annual rate of 2% of our net assets, which was paid quarterly in arrears. Under the Advisory Agreement, we also agreed to pay an incentive fee to MCCA based on both realized investment income and net realized capital gains less unrealized capital depreciation. This incentive fee was equal to (a) 20% of the excess, if any, of our net investment income for each quarter that exceeded a quarterly hurdle rate equal to 2% (8% annualized) of our net assets, and (b) 20% of our net realized capital gain less unrealized capital depreciation. The incentive fee calculated in clause (b) was paid on an annual basis. ECAC provided administrative services to us for which we paid ECAC an administrative fee. Under the administration agreement we entered into with ECAC on June 30, 2005, we reimbursed the ECAC for its costs and expenses in performing its obligations and providing personnel and facilities up to a maximum of $0.5 million per year. Pursuant to the internalization described above, our administration agreement with ECAC expired on June 30, 2009. Consequently, all services previously provided to us by ECAC are now performed internally by our employees or from time to time by other third parties .

Operating Activities. We use cash to make new investments and follow-on investments in our existing portfolio companies. We record these investments at cost on the applicable trade date. Realized gains or losses are computed using the specific identification method. On an ongoing basis, we carry our investments in our financial statements at fair value, as determined by our board of directors. See “—Significant Accounting Policies – Valuation” below. As of December 31, 2010, we had invested 72.7% of our net assets in securities of portfolio companies that constituted qualifying investments under the 1940 Act. At that time, we had invested 16.6% by value in shares of common stock, 4.9% in membership interests in limited liability companies, 0.4% in options and warrants, and 50.8% in various debt instruments. Also, as of December 31, 2010, we had invested the proceeds of borrowings on margin (as discussed below under “—Financing Activities”) in short-term, highly liquid investments, consisting primarily of U.S. Treasury Bills, interest-bearing bank accounts and certificates of deposit, that are, in our opinion, appropriate for the preservation of the principal amount of such instruments.

Under certain circumstances, we make follow-on investments in some of our portfolio companies. As of December 31, 2010, we had a total commitment of $0.3 million to Spectrum Management, LLC in the business products and services sector. See “—Portfolio Companies – Spectrum Management, LLC” below.

Financing Activities. From time to time, we use leverage to finance a portion of our investments. We then repay such debt from the sale of portfolio securities. Under the 1940 Act, we have the ability to borrow funds and issue debt securities or preferred stock that are referred to as senior securities, subject to certain restrictions including an overall limitation on the amount of outstanding debt, or leverage, relative to equity of 1:1. Because of the nature and size of our portfolio investments, we periodically borrow funds to make qualifying investments in order to maintain our qualification as a RIC. During 2010 and 2009, we borrowed such funds by accessing a margin account with a securities brokerage firm. We invest the proceeds of these margin loans in high-quality securities such as U.S. Treasury securities until they are repaid. We refer to these high-quality investments as “restricted assets” because they are not generally available for investment in portfolio companies under the terms of borrowing. If, in the future, we cannot borrow funds to make such qualifying investments at the end of any future quarter, we may not qualify as a RIC and would become subject to corporate-level income tax on our net investment income and realized capital gains, if any. In addition, our distributions to stockholders would be taxable as ordinary dividends to the extent paid from earnings and profits. See “Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

Distributions. On March 24, 2009, we announced that we suspended our managed distribution policy and payment of quarterly distributions for an indefinite period, following the distribution of the first quarter dividend to be paid on March 30, 2009. As originally implemented, the policy provided for quarterly dividends at an annualized rate equal to 10% of the Fund’s market value per share as at the end of the preceding calendar year. We will continue to pay out net investment income and/or realized capital gains, if any, on an annual basis as required under the 1940 Act.

Possible Share Repurchase. As a closed-end business development company, our shares of common stock are not redeemable at the option of stockholders, and our shares currently trade at a discount to their net asset value. Our board of directors has determined that it would be in the best interests of our stockholders to reduce or eliminate this market value discount. Accordingly, we have been authorized to, and may from time to time, repurchase shares of our outstanding common stock (including by means of tender offers or privately negotiated transactions) in an effort to reduce or eliminate this market discount or to increase the net asset value of the our shares. We are not required to undertake any such share repurchases, nor do we anticipate taking such action in 2011.

Significant Accounting Policies

Valuation of Investments — Portfolio investments are carried at fair value with the net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation included in the determination of net assets. Valuations of portfolio securities are performed in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and the financial reporting policies of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The applicable methods prescribed by such principles and policies are described below:

Publicly-traded portfolio securities —Investments in companies whose securities are publicly traded are generally valued at their quoted market price at the close of business on the valuation date.

Privately-held portfolio securities —The fair value of investments for which no market exists is determined on the basis of procedures established in good faith by our Board of Directors. As a general principle, the current “fair value” of an investment would be the amount we might reasonably expect to receive for it upon its current sale, in an orderly manner. Appraisal valuations are necessarily subjective and the estimated values arrived at by the Fund may differ materially from amounts actually received upon the disposition of portfolio securities.

During the first twelve months after an investment is made, the Fund utilizes the original investment amount to determine the fair value unless significant developments have occurred during this twelve month period which would indicate a material effect on the portfolio company (such as results of operations or changes in general market conditions). After the twelve month period, or if material events have occurred within the twelve month period, Fund management considers a two step process when appraising investments of privately held companies. The first step involves determining the enterprise value of the portfolio company. During this step, Fund management considers three different valuation approaches: a market approach, an income approach, and an asset approach. The particular facts and circumstances of each portfolio company determine which approach, or combination of approaches, will be utilized. The second step when appraising equity investments of privately held companies involves allocating value to the various debt and equity securities of the company. Fund management allocates value to these securities based on their relative priorities. For equity securities such as warrants, the Fund may also incorporate alternative methodologies including the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model.

Market approach – The market approach typically employed by Fund management calculates the enterprise value of a company as a multiple of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (“EBITDA”) generated by the company for the trailing twelve month period. Adjustments to the company’s EBITDA, including those for non-recurring items, may be considered. Multiples are estimated based on current market conditions and past experience in the private company marketplace and are subjective in nature. The Fund will apply liquidity and other discounts it deems appropriate to equity valuations where applicable. The Fund may also use, when available, third-party transactions in a portfolio company’s securities as the basis of valuation (the “private market method”). The private market method will be used only with respect to completed transactions or firm offers made by sophisticated, independent investors.

Income approach – The income approach typically utilized by Fund management calculates the enterprise value of a company utilizing a discounted cash flow model incorporating projected future cash flows of the company. Projected future cash flows consider the historical performance of the company as well as current and projected market participant performance. Discount rates are estimated based on current market conditions and past experience in the private company marketplace and are subjective in nature. The Fund will apply liquidity and other discounts it deems appropriate to equity valuations where applicable.

Asset approach – The Fund considers the asset approach to determine the fair value of significantly deteriorated investments demonstrating circumstances indicative of a liquidation analysis. This situation may arise when a portfolio company: 1) cannot generate adequate cash flow to meet the principal and interest payments on its indebtedness; 2) is not successful in refinancing the its debt upon maturity; 3) Fund management believes the credit quality of a loan has deteriorated due to changes in the business and underlying asset or market conditions may result in the company’s inability to meet future obligations; or 4) the portfolio company’s reorganization or bankruptcy. Consideration is also given as to whether a liquidation event would be orderly or forced.

Fund management considers that the Fund’s general intent is to hold its loans to maturity when appraising its privately held debt investments. As such, Fund management believes that the fair value will not exceed the cost of the investment. However, in addition to the previously described analysis involving allocation of value to the debt instrument, the Fund performs a yield analysis to determine if a debt security has been impaired.

Certificates of deposit purchased by the Fund generally will be valued at their face value, plus interest accrued to the date of valuation.

The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors may engage independent, third-party valuation firms to conduct independent appraisals and review management’s preliminary valuations of each privately-held investment that the Fund (a) has held for more than one year and (b) holds on its books at a fair value of at least $2.0 million in order to make their own independent assessment. Any third-party valuation data would be considered as one of many factors in a fair value determination. The Audit Committee then would recommend the fair values for all privately-held securities based on all relevant factors to the Board of Directors for final approval.

Because of the inherent uncertainty of the valuation of portfolio securities which do not have readily ascertainable market values, amounting to $27.7 million and $42.4 million as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, our fair value determinations may materially differ from the values that would have been used had a ready market existed for the securities. There were no publicly traded securities as of December 31, 2010 or 2009.

On a daily basis, we adjust our net asset value for the changes in the value of our publicly held securities, if applicable, and material changes in the value of private securities, generally determined on a quarterly basis or as announced in a press release, and reports those amounts to Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. Weekly and daily net asset values appear in various publications, including Barron’s and The Wall Street Journal .

Federal Income Taxes

We intend to comply with the requirements of the Code necessary for us to qualify as a RIC. So long as we comply with these requirements, we generally will not be subject to corporate-level federal income taxes on otherwise taxable income (including net realized capital gains) distributed to stockholders. Therefore, we did not record a provision for federal income taxes in our financial statements. As of December 31, 2010, we had a capital loss carry forward of $15.6 million which may be used to offset future capital gains. We may borrow money from time to time to maintain our status as a RIC under the Code. See “—Overview – Financing Activities” above.

Interest Income Recognition

We record interest income, adjusted for amortization of premium and accretion of discount, on an accrual basis to the extent that we expect to collect such amounts. We stop accruing interest on investments when we determine that interest is no longer collectible. If we receive any cash after determining that interest is no longer collectible, we treat such cash as payment on the principal balance until the entire principal balance has been repaid, before we recognize any additional interest income. We accrete or amortize discounts and premiums on securities purchased over the life of the respective security using the effective yield method. The amortized cost of investments represents the original cost adjusted for the accretion of discount and/or amortization of premium on debt securities.

Payment in Kind Interest

We have loans in our portfolio that may pay PIK interest. We add PIK interest, if any, computed at the contractual rate specified in each loan agreement, to the principal balance of the loan and recorded as interest income. To maintain the Fund’s status as a RIC, we must pay out to our stockholders this non-cash source of income in the form of dividends even if we have not yet collected any cash in respect of such investments.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Effective January 1, 2010, we adopted changes issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) to add new requirements for disclosures about significant transfers into and out of Levels 1 and 2 and separate disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements relating to Level 3 measurements. In addition, the update clarifies existing fair value disclosures about the level of disaggregation and about inputs and valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The adoption of this standard had no impact on our financial position and results of operations.

In January 2010, the FASB issued changes to disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. Specifically, the changes require a reporting entity to disclose, in the reconciliation of fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3), separate information about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements (that is, on a gross basis rather than as one net number). These changes become effective for the Fund beginning January 1, 2011. Other than the additional disclosure requirements, we do not anticipate that the adoption of this standard will have a material effect on our financial position and results of operations.

Current Market Conditions

Overall economic conditions have improved slightly through 2010 as the US economy has expanded slightly. However, the economic recovery has been hampered by persistent high unemployment levels and lingering problems in the housing market. Further, the banking industry continues to experience additional bank failures as regulators continue to impose strict capital requirements. Additionally, future economic expansion and business investment is threatened by perceptions of higher taxes and healthcare costs, as well as the high levels of government deficit spending.

Market conditions for business transactions including mergers and acquisitions and private equity investments improved throughout 2010 as low interest rates have reduced capital costs, some banks are lending more aggressively, valuations have increased and buyer and seller expectations have converged. These conditions were contributors to an upturn in transaction volume during 2010 since declining significantly in 2009. In addition, corporations have been deleveraging and are holding significant amounts of cash and many have begun to focus on acquisitions as part of future growth plans. Private equity firms have access to historically large amounts of committed capital as private equity activity has been lower than anticipated for nearly two years and fund raising was robust heading into the economic downturn.

Consistent with other companies in the financial services sector, our performance has been adversely affected. Between December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2010 our net asset value declined from $9.16 per share to $4.29 per share. This further impacted the closing price of our common stock, as it declined approximately 25.6% during 2009 and a further 21.9% during 2010 and, as of December 31, 2010, is trading at a 41.8% discount to our net asset value.

During 2009 and 2010, we executed certain initiatives to enhance liquidity, achieve a lower operational cost structure, provide more assistance to portfolio companies and enhance communication with shareholders. Specifically, we changed the composition of our Board of Directors and Management, terminated certain of our follow-on investments, internalized the management of the Fund, suspended our managed distribution policy and modified our investment strategy to pursue shorter term liquidation opportunities. We believe these actions continue to be necessary to protect capital and liquidity during this turbulent economic period in order to preserve and enhance shareholder value. We also expect that, because of management internalization, certain expenses of the Fund will not increase commensurate with an increase in the size of the Fund and, therefore, we can achieve efficiencies in our cost structure if we are able to grow the Fund.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

Overview



Equus is a Business Development Corporation (“BDC”) that provides financing solutions for privately held middle market and small capitalization companies. We began operations in 1983 and have been a publicly traded closed-end fund since 1991. Our investment objective is to seek the highest total return, consisting of capital appreciation and current income.



The valuation of the Fund’s investments is the most significant area of judgment impacting the financial statements. The Fund’s portfolio investments are valued at estimates of fair value, with the net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation included in the determination of net assets. Almost all of the long-term investments are in privately-held or restricted securities, the valuation of which is necessarily subjective. Actual values may differ materially from the Fund’s estimated fair value.



Most of the Fund’s portfolio companies utilize leverage, and the leverage magnifies the return on its investments. For example, if a portfolio company has a total enterprise value of $10.0 million and $7.5 million in funded indebtedness, its equity is valued at $2.5 million. If the enterprise value increases or decreases by 20%, to $12.0 million or $8.0 million, respectively, the value of the equity increases or decreases by 80%, to $4.5 million or $0.5 million, respectively. This disproportionate increase or decrease adds a level of volatility to the Fund’s equity-oriented portfolio securities.



We are an internally managed fund, inasmuch as we directly employ our management team and incur the costs and expenses associated with Fund operations. There is no outside investment advisory organization providing services to us under a fee-based advisory agreement, or an administrative organization charging us for services rendered. We expect that, because of internalized management, certain expenses of the Fund will not increase commensurate with an increase in the size of the Fund and, therefore, we can achieve efficiencies in our cost structure if we are able to grow the Fund.



Effective August 11, 2006, we began to employ a total return investment strategy. The total return strategy combines both growth and income investments and is intended to strike a balance between the potential for gain and the risk of loss. In the growth category, we are a “growth-at- reasonable-price” investor. We invest primarily in privately owned companies and are open to virtually any potential growth investment in the privately owned arena. However, our primary aim is to identify and acquire only those equity securities that meet our criteria for selling at reasonable prices. The income investments made consist principally of purchasing debt financing with the objective of generating regular interest income as well as long-term capital appreciation through the exercise and sale of warrants received in connection with the financing.



Since the Fund is a closed-end BDC, stockholders have no right to present their shares to the Fund for redemption. Because the shares continue to trade at a discount, the Board of Directors has determined that it would be in the best interest of the Fund’s stockholders for the Fund to be authorized to attempt to reduce or eliminate the market value discount from net asset value. Accordingly, from time to time the Fund may, but is not required to, repurchase its shares (including by means of tender offers) to attempt to reduce or eliminate the discount or to increase the net asset value of those shares.

Significant Developments



The following are key activities occurring during the quarter:



(i) Investment in Orco Germany S.A. On April 27, 2011, the Fund announced that it had entered into two separate transactions involving the purchase of an aggregate of 11,408 Orco Germany S.A. (“Orco,’ the “Bonds”) 4% bonds due May 2012 . Orco is a commercial and multi-family residential real estate holding company and developer based in Berlin. The consideration provided to the selling bondholders consisted of an aggregate of 1,700,000 newly issued shares of common stock of the Fund. The Fund received 8,890 of the Bonds on April 27, 2011. On May 9, 2011, one of these agreements was amended and restated to provide for an additional 45 days to deliver the remaining 2,518 of the Bonds in exchange for providing to the Fund approximately $1.6 million in cash as security for such delivery. As the remaining bonds were not delivered by the specified date, the cash collateral became free and clear property of the Fund on June 23, 2011.



(ii) Leadership Changes. On June 7, 2011, the Fund announced that its Board of Directors appointed Alessandro Benedetti as the Fund's Executive Chairman and John Hardy as the Fund's Chief Executive Officer. Previous to their appointments, Mr. Benedetti was an independent member of the Fund's Board of Directors, and Mr. Hardy was the Fund's Executive Chairman. Mr. Benedetti, is an Italian national with decades of business experience in a diverse range of industries including telecoms, agro-industrial engineering, mining, real estate, renewable and nonrenewable energy and investment companies. He is fully conversant with business conditions and operating procedures in the world's key markets, especially Western and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, CIS, Africa, North America and the Middle East. Mr. Hardy has had extensive experience in the insurance, finance and banking sectors, as well as international mergers and acquisitions.



(iii) Annual Shareholder Meeting. On June 10, 2011, the Fund held its Annual Share Meeting. Shareholders approved the election of nine director nominees and the appointment of UHY LLP as the Fund’s independent auditor for the fiscal year 2011.



Significant Accounting Policies



The following is a summary of significant accounting policies followed by the Fund in the preparation of its financial statements:



Use of Estimates —The preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Although we believe the estimates and assumptions used in preparing these financial statements and related notes are reasonable in light of known facts and circumstances, actual results could differ from those estimates.



Valuation of Investments — Portfolio investments are carried at fair value with the net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation included in the determination of net assets. Valuations of portfolio securities are performed in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and the financial reporting policies of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The applicable methods prescribed by such principles and policies are described below:



Publicly-traded portfolio securities—Investments in companies whose securities are publicly traded are generally valued at their quoted market price at the close of business on the valuation date.



Privately-held portfolio securities —The fair value of investments for which no market exists is determined on the basis of procedures established in good faith by our Board of Directors. As a general principle, the current “fair value” of an investment would be the amount we might reasonably expect to receive for it upon its current sale, in an orderly manner. Appraisal valuations are necessarily subjective and the estimated values arrived at by the Fund may differ materially from amounts actually received upon the disposition of portfolio securities.



During the first twelve months after an investment is made, the Fund utilizes the original investment amount to determine the fair value unless significant developments have occurred during this twelve month period which would indicate a material effect on the portfolio company (such as results of operations or changes in general market conditions). After the twelve month period, or if material events have occurred within the twelve month period, Fund management considers a two step process when appraising investments of privately held companies. The first step involves determining the enterprise value of the portfolio company. During this step, Fund management considers three different valuation approaches: a market approach, an income approach, and an asset approach. The particular facts and circumstances of each portfolio company determine which approach, or combination of approaches, will be utilized. The second step when appraising equity investments of privately held companies involves allocating value to the various debt and equity securities of the company. Fund management allocates value to these securities based on their relative priorities. For equity securities such as warrants, the Fund may also incorporate alternative methodologies including the Black-Scholes Option Pricing Model and the Monte Carlo Simulation.



Market approach – The market approach typically employed by Fund management calculates the enterprise value of a company as a multiple of earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (“EBITDA”) generated by the company for the trailing twelve month period. Adjustments to the company’s EBITDA, including those for non-recurring items, may be considered. Multiples are estimated based on current market conditions and past experience in the private company marketplace and are subjective in nature. The Fund will apply liquidity and other discounts it deems appropriate to equity valuations where applicable. The Fund may also use, when available, third-party transactions in a portfolio company’s securities as the basis of valuation (the “private market method”). The private market method will be used only with respect to completed transactions or firm offers made by sophisticated, independent investors.



Income approach – The income approach typically utilized by Fund management calculates the enterprise value of a company utilizing a discounted cash flow model incorporating projected future cash flows of the company. Projected future cash flows consider the historical performance of the company as well as current and projected market participant performance. Discount rates are estimated based on current market conditions and past experience in the private company marketplace and are subjective in nature. The Fund will apply liquidity and other discounts it deems appropriate to equity valuations where applicable.



Asset approach – The Fund considers the asset approach to determine the fair value of significantly deteriorated investments demonstrating circumstances indicative of a liquidation analysis. This situation may arise when a portfolio company: 1) cannot generate adequate cash flow to meet the principal and interest payments on its indebtedness; 2) is not successful in refinancing its debt upon maturity; 3) Fund management believes the credit quality of a loan has deteriorated due to changes in the business and underlying asset or market conditions may result in the company’s inability to meet future obligations; or 4) the portfolio company’s reorganization or bankruptcy. Consideration is also given as to whether a liquidation event would be orderly or forced.



Fund management considers that the Fund’s general intent is to hold its loans to maturity when appraising its privately held debt investments. As such, Fund management believes that the fair value will not exceed the cost of the investment. However, in addition to the previously described analysis involving allocation of value to the debt instrument, the Fund performs a yield analysis to determine if a debt security has been impaired.



Certificates of deposit purchased by the Fund generally will be valued at their face value, plus interest accrued to the date of valuation.



The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors may engage independent, third-party valuation firms to conduct independent appraisals and review management’s preliminary valuations of each privately-held investment that the Fund (a) has held for more than one year and (b) holds on its books at a fair value of at least $2.0 million in order to make their own independent assessment. Any third-party valuation data would be considered as one of many factors in a fair value determination. The Audit Committee then would recommend the fair values for all privately-held securities based on all relevant factors to the Board of Directors for final approval.



Because of the inherent uncertainty of the valuation of portfolio securities which do not have readily ascertainable market values, amounting to $21.7 million and $27.7 million as of June 30, 2011 and December 31, 2010, respectively, our fair value determinations may materially differ from the values that would have been used had a ready market existed for the securities. As of June 30, 2011, one of the Fund’s portfolio investments, 4% bonds due May 2012 issued by Orco Germany S.A., is publicly listed on the Euro MTF Market of the Luxemburg Stock Exchange. However, there has been no recent trading activity. There were no publicly traded securities as at December 31, 2010.



On a daily basis, we adjust our net asset value for the changes in the value of our publicly held securities, if applicable, and material changes in the value of private securities, generally determined on a quarterly basis or as announced in a press release, and reports those amounts to Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. Weekly and daily net asset values appear in various publications, including Barron’s and The Wall Street Journal .



Deferred Offering Costs —Accumulation of costs related to the offering whereby we will sell additional shares or rights to acquire shares at a market price that may have been below net asset value. The main components of the costs are legal fees and consultant’s fees specifically related to the offering.



Investment Transactions —Investment transactions are recorded on the accrual method. Realized gains and losses on investments sold are computed on a specific identification basis.



We classify our investments in accordance with the requirements of the 1940 Act. Under the 1940 Act, “Control Investments” are defined as investments in companies in which we own more than 25% of the voting securities or maintains greater than 50% of the board representation. Under the 1940 Act, “Affiliate Investments” are defined as those non-control investments in companies in which we own between 5% and 25% of the voting securities. Under the 1940 Act, “Non-affiliate Investments” are defined as investments that are neither Control Investments nor Affiliate Investments.



Federal Income Taxes —We intend to comply with the requirements of the Code necessary for us to qualify as a RIC. So long as it complies with these requirements, the Fund generally will not be subject to corporate-level federal income taxes on otherwise taxable income (including net realized capital gains) distributed to stockholders. Therefore, the Fund did not record a provision for federal income taxes in its financial statements. The Fund may borrow money from time to time to maintain its status as a RIC under the Code.



Interest Income Recognition —We record interest income, adjusted for amortization of premium and accretion of discount, on an accrual basis to the extent that we expect to collect such amounts. We stop accruing interest on investments when we determine that interest is no longer collectible. If we receive any cash after determining that interest is no longer collectible, we treat such cash as payment on the principal balance until the entire principal balance has been repaid, before we recognize any additional interest income. We accrete or amortize discounts and premiums on securities purchased over the life of the respective security using the effective yield method. The amortized cost of investments represents the original cost adjusted for the accretion of discount and/or amortization of premium on debt securities.



Payment in Kind Interest (PIK) —We have loans in our portfolio that may pay PIK interest. We add PIK interest, if any, computed at the contractual rate specified in each loan agreement, to the principal balance of the loan and recorded as interest income. To maintain our status as a RIC, we must pay out to stockholders this non-cash source of income in the form of dividends even if we have not yet collected any cash in respect of such investments.



Current Market Conditions



Overall economic conditions have stabilized in the first half of 2011, as the U.S. economy has expanded at a modest rate. However, the economic recovery has been hampered by persistent high unemployment levels and increased uncertainty related to U.S. government deficit spending, debt levels, and potential foreign government defaults. Further, the banking industry continues to experience additional bank failures as regulators continue to impose strict capital requirements. Additionally, future economic expansion and business investment is threatened by perceptions of higher taxes and healthcare costs, as well as the uncertainty surrounding government deficit spending and debt limits.



Market conditions for business transactions including mergers and acquisitions and private equity investments improved throughout 2010 and have effectively plateaued at these levels through the first six months of 2011as low interest rates have reduced capital costs, some banks are lending more aggressively, valuations have increased and buyer and seller expectations have converged. These conditions were contributors to an upturn in transaction volume during 2010 and the first quarter 2011 since declining significantly in 2009. In addition, corporations have been deleveraging and are holding significant amounts of cash and many have begun to focus on acquisitions as part of future growth plans. Private equity firms have access to historically large amounts of committed capital as private equity activity has been lower than anticipated for nearly two years and fund raising was robust heading into the economic downturn.



Consistent with other companies in the financial services sector, our performance has been adversely affected. Between December 31, 2008 and June 30, 2011 our net asset value declined from $9.16 per share to $3.92 per share. This further impacted the closing price of our common stock, as it declined approximately 25.6% during 2009 and a

further 21.9% during 2010 and, as of June 30, 2011, is trading at a 38.8% discount to our net asset value.



We have continued to execute certain initiatives to enhance liquidity, achieve a lower operational cost structure, provide more assistance to portfolio companies and enhance communication with shareholders. Specifically, we changed the composition of our Board of Directors and Management, terminated certain of our follow-on investments, internalized the management of the Fund, suspended our managed distribution policy, sold certain of our portfolio investments for cash, and modified our investment strategy to pursue shorter term liquidation opportunities. We believe these actions continue to be necessary to protect capital and liquidity during this turbulent economic period in order to preserve and enhance shareholder value. We also expect that, because of management internalization, certain expenses of the Fund will not increase commensurate with an increase in the size of the Fund and, therefore, we can achieve efficiencies in our cost structure if we are able to grow the Fund.



Liquidity and Capital Resources



We generate cash primarily from maturities, sales of securities and borrowings, as well as capital gains realized upon the sale of portfolio investments. We use cash primarily to make additional investments, either in new companies or as follow-on investments in the existing portfolio companies and to pay the dividends to our stockholders.



Because of the nature and size of the portfolio investments, we may periodically borrow funds to make qualifying investments to maintain its tax status as a RIC. During the three months ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, we borrowed such funds by utilizing a margin account with a securities brokerage firm. There is no assurance that such arrangement will be available in the future. If the Fund is unable to borrow funds to make qualifying investments, it may no longer qualify as a RIC. The Fund would then be subject to corporate income tax on its net investment income and realized capital gains, and distributions to stockholders would be subject to income tax as ordinary dividends.



The Fund has the ability to borrow funds and issue forms of senior securities representing indebtedness or stock, such as preferred stock, subject to certain restrictions. Net taxable investment income and net taxable realized gains from the sales of portfolio investments are intended to be distributed at least annually, to the extent such amounts are not reserved for payment of expenses and contingencies or to make follow-on or new investments. Pursuant to the restrictions in the existing line of credit, the Fund is not allowed to incur additional indebtedness unless approved by the lender.



The Fund reserves the right to retain net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses for reinvestment or to pay contingencies and expenses. Such retained amounts, if any, will be taxable to the Fund as long-term capital gains and stockholders will be able to claim their proportionate share of the federal income taxes paid on such gains as a credit against their own federal income tax liabilities. Stockholders will also be entitled to increase the adjusted tax basis of their Fund shares by the difference between their undistributed capital gains and their tax credit.



We are evaluating the impact of current market conditions on our portfolio company valuations and their ability to provide current income. We have followed valuation techniques in a consistent manner; however, we are cognizant of current market conditions that might affect future valuations of portfolio securities. We believe that our operating cash flow and cash on hand will be sufficient to meet operating requirements and to finance routine capital expenditures through the next twelve months.



Results of Operations



Investment Income and Expense



Net investment loss after all expenses was $1.2 million and $0.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively and $1.9 million and $0.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively. The increase in net investment loss generated at June 30, 2011 compared to June 30, 2010 is due primarily to the decrease in total investment income for the periods.



Total income from portfolio securities was $0.4 million and $0.8 million for the three months ended June 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and $0.8 million and $1.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2011, and 2010, respectively. The decrease was primarily due to the decline in income producing investments resulting from the monetizations of 1848 Capital Partners LLC, Big Apple Entertainment Partners LLC and London Bridge Entertainment Partners Ltd.

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