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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (12-08-13 11:32 PM)

Description

JMP Group, Inc. CEO, 10% Owner Joseph A Jolson bought 209,808 shares on 12-04-2013 at $ 6.61.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

JMP Group, Inc., together with its subsidiaries (collectively, "the Company", "we" or "us"), is a full-service investment banking and asset management firm. We provide investment banking, sales and trading, and equity research services to corporate and institutional clients, and alternative asset management products and services to institutional investors and high net-worth individuals. In addition, we manage and invest in corporate credit instruments through collateralized loan obligations and direct investments.

We focus our efforts on small and middle-market companies in the following four growth industries: financial services, healthcare, real estate, and technology. Our specialization in these areas has enabled us to develop recognized expertise and to cultivate extensive industry relationships. As a result, we have established our firm as a key advisor for our corporate clients, a trusted resource for institutional investors, and an effective investment manager for our asset management clients. We currently operate from our headquarters in San Francisco and from additional offices in New York, Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis, and outside Philadelphia and Atlanta.

We provide our corporate clients with a wide variety of services, including strategic advice and capital raising solutions, sales and trading support, and equity research coverage. We provide institutional investors with capital markets intelligence and objective, informed investment recommendations about individual equities that are not widely followed. We believe that our concentration on small and middle-market companies, as well as our broad range of product offerings, positions us as a leader in what has traditionally been an underserved and high-growth market.

The selection of our four target industries, the development of multiple products and services and the establishment of our four revenue-producing business lines—investment banking, sales and trading, equity research and asset management—has created a diversified business model, especially when compared to that of our more specialized competitors. We have been able to balance somewhat volatile revenue streams from our investment banking activities and incentive-based asset management fees with more stable revenue streams from our sales and trading commissions and base asset management fees. In addition, our target industries have historically performed, in certain respects, counter-cyclically to one another, allowing us to win business and generate revenues in various economic and capital markets conditions. In 2009, as part of our ongoing efforts to diversify our asset management business, we acquired a corporate credit business that operates as a manager of collateralized loan obligations. In 2011, we launched a specialty finance company that provides customized financing to small and midsized businesses.

Principal Business Lines

The Company conducts its primary business activities through three wholly-owned or majority-owned subsidiaries: JMP Securities LLC (“JMP Securities”), our broker-dealer operation; Harvest Capital Strategies LLC (“HCS”), our asset management arm, which is an investment adviser registered with the SEC; and JMP Credit Advisors LLC (“JMP Credit Advisors”), our corporate credit operation.

JMP Securities is a U.S. registered broker-dealer under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), and is a member of the FINRA. JMP Securities operates as an introducing broker and does not hold funds or securities for, or owe any money or securities to, customers and does not carry accounts for customers. All customer transactions are cleared through another broker-dealer on a fully disclosed basis. JMP Securities provides equity research, sales and trading to institutional brokerage clients and capital raising and strategic advisory services to corporate clients. As of December 31, 2012, JMP Securities had 178 full-time employees, including 47 in equity research, 43 in sales and trading, 53 in investment banking and 35 in operations and administration.

HCS is a registered investment advisor under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended, and provides investment management services for sophisticated investors through investment partnerships and other entities managed by HCS. HCS launched Harvest Capital Credit LLC ("HCC") on August 18, 2011 to make direct investments in the form of subordinated debt and, to a lesser extent, senior debt and minority equity investments, in small to mid-size U.S. companies. On December 26, 2012, Harvest Capital Credit Corporation, an entity we formed solely for the purpose of acquiring HCC, filed a registration statement on Form N-2 with the SEC in connection with the proposed initial public offering of HCC, through Harvest Capital Credit Corporation, as a Business Development Company. As of December 31, 2012, HCC had three full-time employees. During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, HCS actively managed a family of six hedge funds, one hedge fund of funds, two private equity funds, and HCC. As of December 31, 2012, HCS had 32 full-time employees.

Effective April 7, 2009, through our wholly-owned subsidiary JMP Credit, we completed the acquisition of 100% of the membership interests of Cratos Capital Partners, LLC (which changed its name to JMP Credit Advisors LLC on July 12, 2010) and its subsidiaries, including Cratos Capital Management, LLC (collectively, “Cratos”), a manager of CLOs, together with certain securities of Cratos CLO I, Ltd. (“Cratos CLO”). During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011, JMP Credit Advisors actively managed Cratos CLO and another CLO that resulted from the acquisition of a management contract in June 2010. The non Cratos CLO began liquidation proceedings in December 2011, which was completed July 2012. As of December 31, 2012, JMP Credit Advisors had 11 full-time employees.

Investment Banking

Our investment banking professionals provide capital raising, mergers and acquisitions transaction and other strategic advisory services to corporate clients. Dedicated industry coverage groups serve each of our four target industries, enabling our investment bankers to develop expertise in specific markets and to form close relationships with corporate executives, private equity investors, venture capitalists and other key industry participants. We offer our clients a high level of attention from senior personnel and have designed our organizational structure so that the investment bankers who are responsible for securing and maintaining client relationships also actively participate in providing all related transaction execution services to those clients.

By focusing consistently on our target industries—financial services, healthcare, real estate, and technology—we have developed a comprehensive understanding of the unique challenges and demands involved in executing corporate finance and strategic advisory assignments in these sectors. A significant portion of our corporate finance revenues is earned from small and mid-capitalization public companies, and the balance is earned from private companies. Some of our clients retain us for our advisory and capital raising capabilities during an accelerated growth phase as a private company and then continue to work with us through an initial public offering or company sale process. We maintain exceptional client focus both during and following a transaction, leading to a true advisory relationship and a pattern of assisting companies with multiple transactions.

Corporate Finance

We assist our publicly traded and privately held corporate clients with capital raising activities, which include the underwriting of a wide range of equity and debt securities, including common, preferred and convertible securities. Our public equity underwriting capabilities include initial public offerings and follow-on equity offerings. We also act as an agent in private placements of equity and debt securities and arrange private investments in public equity (“PIPE”) transactions as well as privately negotiated, registered direct stock offerings on behalf of our public company clients. We typically place securities with our client base of institutional investors, private equity and venture capital funds and high net-worth individuals.

Because our corporate clients are generally considered high-growth companies, they are frequently in need of new capital. Many of our client relationships develop early, when a client company is still private, in which case we may facilitate private placements of the clients’ securities. Thereafter, if our client prepares for an initial public offering, we are generally considered to act as an underwriter of that stock offering. Our ability to structure innovative private offerings and to identify the likely buyers of such offerings makes us a valuable advisor for many small and middle-market companies, as does our industry specialization. We expect that, while the environment for initial public offerings may not be consistently favorable in the future, we should be able to depend on follow-on offerings, PIPEs, registered direct offerings and private placements to continue to generate corporate finance revenues.

Mergers and Acquisitions and Other Strategic Advisory

We work with corporate clients on a broad range of key strategic matters, including mergers and acquisitions, divestitures and corporate restructurings, valuations of businesses and assets, and fairness opinions and special committee assignments. Because we serve a variety of corporate clients—from emerging growth companies to mature private and public companies—the values of these transactions range in size.

We provide our advice to senior executives and boards of directors of client companies in connection with transactions that are typically of significant strategic and financial importance to these companies. We believe that our success as a strategic advisor stems from our ability to structure and execute complex transactions that create long-term stockholder value.

Because of our focus on innovative and fast-growing companies, we are most often an advisor in company sale transactions, although we are taking steps to create equilibrium in our advisory business and expect, in addition, to increasingly represent corporate clients as buyers over time. We believe that our position as a lead manager or senior co-manager of public and private equity offerings will facilitate the growth of our mergers and acquisitions and strategic advisory businesses, as companies that have been issuers of securities become more mature and pursue acquisitions or other exit events for their investors.

Sales and Trading

Our sales and trading operation distributes our equity research product and communicates our proprietary investment recommendations to our institutional investors. In addition, our sales and trading staff executes equity trades on behalf of our institutional clients and markets the securities of companies for which we act as an underwriter.

We have established a broad institutional client base rooted in longstanding relationships, which have been developed through a consistent focus on the investment and trading objectives of our clients. Our sales and trading professionals work closely with our equity research staff to provide insight and differentiated investment advice to approximately 500 institutional clients nationwide.

We believe that our sales and trading clients turn to us for timely, informed investment advice. Our equity research features proprietary themes and actionable ideas about industries and companies that are not widely evaluated by many other research providers. Many peer firms focused on small capitalization stock have shut down or have been bought out in the last year. Additionally, with the failure or consolidation of several very large investment banking firms, the amount of market-making activity, liquidity and research coverage provided by broker-dealers for smaller stocks has significantly decreased. However, we continue to commit sales and trading resources to smaller-capitalization companies with the belief that institutional investors require and value such specialized knowledge and service.

Our sales and trading personnel are also central to our ability to market equity offerings and provide after-market support. Our capital markets group manages the syndication, marketing, execution and distribution of the security offerings we manage. Our syndicate activities include coordinating the marketing and order-taking process for underwritten transactions and conducting after-market stabilization and initial market-making. Our syndicate staff is also responsible for developing and maintaining relationships with the syndicate departments of other investment banks.

Equity Research

Our research department is charged with developing proprietary investment themes, anticipating sector and cyclical changes, and producing action-oriented reports that will assist our clients with their investment decisions. Our analysts cultivate primary sources of information in order to refine their quantitative and qualitative assessments. Our objective is to provide clients with a clear understanding of industry-specific and company-specific issues that can impact their portfolio returns.

As of December 31, 2012, our research department included 24 publishing research analysts providing investment recommendations on 340 public companies.

While many larger firms have restructured their research departments due to economic and regulatory pressures and have significantly reduced coverage of companies below certain market-capitalization thresholds, we continue to devote the majority of our resources to smaller-capitalization companies. The number of investment funds and the total assets under management committed to small-cap and mid-cap stocks has grown considerably during the last decade. However, managers of these funds are now presented with fewer sources of independent investment research. We continue to provide objective investment recommendations on small and middle-market companies, and we believe that our institutional investor clients depend on us for this informed, fundamental research.

Asset Management

Through HCS, we actively managed a family of six hedge funds, one hedge fund of funds, two private equity funds, and one entity formed to provide loans to small to mid-size U.S. companies. As of December 31, 2012, we had a total of $730.5 million in client assets under management (including assets of employees and portfolio managers) and had an additional $45.1 million of our own capital invested in these vehicles. In addition, as of December 31, 2012 we had invested $2.3 million in funds managed by third parties.

The objective of our multiple strategies is to diversify both revenue and risk while maintaining the attractive economics of the alternative asset management model. We view asset management as an attractive business due to its high margins and the recurring nature of its fee-based revenues as well as its dependence on intellectual capital, which we believe is less susceptible to competitive threats from larger financial institutions.

In the course of advising clients on strategic or private capital raising transactions, our investment bankers may identify instances in which we could commit our own capital to transactions for which we are acting as an agent. In addition, opportunities to deploy equity and debt capital are frequently brought to the attention of our asset management professionals. As a result, in the past we have made, and expect that in the future we may make, principal investments in selected cases and may be able to earn attractive returns on the capital committed.

Corporate Credit

JMP Credit Advisors serves as the investment manager to Cratos CLO which had a diversified portfolio of 242 corporate loans with an aggregate par amount of $418.7 million and restricted cash available to lend of $53.2 million as of December 31, 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2012, JMP Credit Advisors earned management fees of $2.4 million or 50 bps annualized on gross assets under management from Cratos CLO. As we consolidate Cratos CLO, in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (“GAAP”), the management fees earned from it are eliminated on consolidation.

HCC launched on August 18, 2011 to make direct investments in the form of subordinated debt and, to a lesser extent, senior debt and minority equity investments, primarily in privately-held small to mid-size U.S. companies. On December 26, 2012, Harvest Capital Credit Corporation, an entity we formed solely for the purpose of acquiring HCC, filed a registration statement on Form N-2 with the SEC in connection with the proposed initial public offering of HCC, through Harvest Capital Credit Corporation, as a Business Development Company. As of December 31, 2012, the HCC portfolio consisted of 13 loans with an aggregate par amount of $40.3 million. HCS acts as its investment advisor, earning a base management fee equal to 2% annually of the gross assets acquired with equity. HCS does not charge a base management fee on assets funded through the Company's line of credit. JMP Credit Advisors provides HCC with its administrative services, and is reimbursed its expenses, including the allocable percentage of the compensation costs for the employees performing services under the agreement. Because we consolidate HCC in accordance with GAAP, these fees are eliminated on a consolidated basis.

Industry Concentration in Financial Services and Real Estate Sectors

Although we have taken significant steps to diversify and broaden our industry focus, two of the Company’s core franchises remain centered on the specialty finance and real estate industries. These two industries have suffered considerably since the second half of 2007 as turmoil in the U.S. and global economy negatively impacted the financial services and real estate sectors, in particular. Nevertheless, we believe that we have been negotiating this difficult period effectively and believe that market conditions in these sectors may work to our advantage if we are able to leverage our expertise to gain new business in the future.

In 2012, 36% of investment banking revenues were derived from the financial services and real estate sectors, compared to 53% in 2011. Our additional focus on healthcare and technology sectors has counterbalanced our efforts in our original industry groups. In addition to broadening our industry concentration, we have worked in recent years to expand our investment banking product offerings so that we are not solely dependent on the public capital markets for our business opportunities. In 2012, we derived 43% of investment banking revenues from sources other than the public capital markets, including M&A and strategic advisory fees and private capital raising fees.

CEO BACKGROUND

Composition of the Board

Our Board of Directors presently consists of nine members: Joseph A. Jolson, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Craig R. Johnson, our Vice Chairman, Carter D. Mack, Mark L. Lehmann, Kenneth M. Karmin, our Lead Director, Glenn H. Tongue, H. Mark Lunenburg, David M. DiPietro and Jonathan M. Orszag. All of our directors are elected annually for a term expiring at the annual meeting of stockholders in the following year. Each director will hold office until his or her successor has been elected and qualified or until the director’s earlier death, resignation or removal. If any director listed in this Proxy Statement does not stand for re-election, his successor or replacement will stand for re-election at our next annual meeting of stockholders in 2014.

Leadership Structure of the Board

Mr. Jolson has served in the combined roles of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer since 2004. One of our outside directors, Mr. Karmin, has been appointed as Lead Director (and Presiding Director for purposes of NYSE rules) with responsibilities as set forth in the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines. These duties include, as appropriate, chairing executive sessions of the Board, serving as the principal liaison between the Chairman and the independent directors, approving information sent to the Board, approving meeting agendas and schedules for the Board, and ensuring that he or she is available for consultation and direct communication with stockholders, if requested. The Lead Director also has the authority to call meetings of the independent directors.

We believe that Mr. Jolson’s dual roles as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer are in the best interest of the Company and its stockholders as such structure creates unified leadership and a cohesive strategic vision for the Company. As a founder, and with his long history in the industries in which we operate and deep involvement in the operations of the Company, we believe Mr. Jolson is uniquely positioned to identify and recommend to the Board strategic initiatives in light of company culture and opportunities. We believe the oversight provided by the Company’s outside directors, the Board committees and the coordinated efforts between management and the independent directors help balance growth and risk management and the development of the Company’s strategic plans and operations.

Independence of Non-Employee Directors

Each of our Board of Directors and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee has analyzed the independence of each nominee for the Board of Directors and has determined that each of Messrs. Karmin, Tongue, Lunenburg, DiPietro and Orszag is “independent,” as defined in Section 303A of the NYSE Listed Company Manual and within the meaning of our director independence standards (detailed below). In addition, each of our Board of Directors and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee has determined that each member of the Audit Committee is “independent” under the SEC’s audit committee independence standards and that each member of our Compensation Committee is an “outside director” within the meaning of Section 162(m) of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”).

To be considered “independent” within the meaning of our director independence standards, a director must be determined by resolution of our Board of Directors as a whole, after due deliberation, to have no material relationship with the Company other than as a director. In each case, our Board of Directors shall broadly consider all relevant facts and circumstances and shall apply the following standards:

1.
a director who is an employee, or whose immediate family member is an executive officer, of the Company or any of its subsidiaries is not “independent” until three years after the end of such employment relationship;

2.
a director who receives, or whose immediate family member receives, more than $120,000 per year in direct compensation from the Company or any of its subsidiaries, other than director and Board committee fees and pension or other forms of deferred compensation for prior service (provided such compensation is not contingent in any way on continued service), is not “independent” until three years after he or she ceases to receive more than $120,000 per year in such compensation;

3.
a director who is affiliated with or employed by, or whose immediate family member is affiliated with or employed in a professional capacity by, a present or former internal or external auditor of the Company or any of its subsidiaries is not “independent” until three years after the end of the affiliation or the employment relationship;

4.
a director who is employed, or whose immediate family member is employed, as an executive officer of another company where any of the Company’s or any of its subsidiaries’ present executives serve on that company’s compensation committee is not “independent” until three years after the end of such service or the employment relationship;

5.
a director who is an executive officer or an employee, or whose immediate family member is an executive officer, of a company (which does not include charitable entities) that makes payments to, or receives payments from, the Company or any of its subsidiaries for property or services in an amount which, in any single fiscal year, exceeds the greater of $1.0 million or 2% of such other company’s consolidated gross revenues, is not “independent” until three years after falling below such threshold; and

6.
any director that has a material relationship with the Company shall not be independent. Any relationship not required to be disclosed pursuant to Item 404 of Regulation S-K, shall be presumptively not material. For relationships not covered by the preceding sentence, the determination of whether the relationship is material or not, and therefore whether the director would be independent or not, shall be made by the Board of Directors. We would disclose in our next proxy statement the basis for any Board determination that a relationship is immaterial despite the fact that it does not meet the categorical standards of immateriality set forth above.

In addition to the categorical standards discussed above, our Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee and the Board of Directors have considered certain relationships between each independent director and us, and in particular the following types of relationships: (i) brokerage, investment banking and investment management relationships between us and any independent director, their family members and entities with which any of them are affiliated or in which any of them are significantly invested, (ii) employment relationships with family members of our independent directors, (iii) relationships between us and any third-party vendor that is affiliated with any independent director or any of their family members or in which any of them are significantly invested and (iv) relationships with PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm.

In making its independence determination regarding Messrs. Karmin, Tongue, Lunenburg, DiPietro and Orszag, the Board of Directors considered certain transactions, relationships and arrangements, including, among other things, Mr. Karmin’s investment in certain investment funds managed by an affiliate of the Company for which he paid such affiliate $103,464; the employment of Mr. Lunenburg’s son as an analyst at the Company’s subsidiary JMP Securities; and the rental of office space by Mr. Tongue at JMP Securities’ office in New York, New York. These transactions, relationships and arrangements were considered to be within the applicable categorical independence standards discussed above. Entities associated with Messrs. Tongue and Lunenburg maintain securities brokerage accounts with the Company’s subsidiary, JMP Securities, for which trading commissions of $0 and $1,500, respectively, were paid to, and gross credits of $0 and $37,672, respectively, were earned by, JMP Securities from such accounts during 2012.

Nominees for Election as Directors

At the Annual Meeting, our stockholders will be asked to elect our nine director nominees set forth below.

All of the nominees currently are members of the Board of Directors, and all of the nominees have been recommended for re-election to the Board of Directors by our Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee and approved and nominated for re-election by the Board of Directors. Set forth below is information as of March 31, 2013 regarding the nominees, which has been confirmed by each of them and approved for inclusion in this Proxy Statement.

Joseph A. Jolson , age 54, co-founded the Company in 1999, and is our Chief Executive Officer, the Chairman of the Board of Directors, and a member of our Executive Committee. Mr. Jolson has served as our CEO since September 1999 and as Chairman of our Board of Directors since August 2004. Mr. Jolson is also the Chief Executive Officer of Harvest Capital Strategies and JMP Capital LLC and is a Portfolio Manager of Harvest Opportunity Partners II, L.P. and its related funds, one of our family of hedge funds and has served in such positions since 1999, 2007 and 2002, respectively. Previously, Mr. Jolson was a Senior Managing Director and Senior Research Analyst at Montgomery Securities, now Banc of America Securities, for 15 years. Prior to that, he was a Consulting Research Analyst at Fidelity Management and Research in Boston in 1983 and 1984 and at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette in New York from 1980 through 1982. Mr. Jolson was named to Institutional Investor magazine’s All-America Research Team for 10 consecutive years, between 1986 and 1995, for his coverage of the savings and loan industry and was also selected as an All-Star Analyst by the Wall Street Journal in the financial services category in 1996 and 1997. Additionally, he was ranked as a top-five thrift analyst every year from 1985 through 1994 by Greenwich Associates. Mr. Jolson received a MBA degree with distinction from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and a BA degree from Yale University. The Board believes that Mr. Jolson should serve as a director due to, among other factors, his status as a founder of the Company, his experience in the industries in which we operate and his successful management of the operations and the strategic directives of the Company since inception .

Craig R. Johnson , age 58, joined us in January 2002 and is Vice Chairman of the Company, Chairman of Harvest Capital Strategies, and a member of our Executive Committee. Mr. Johnson has served as a member of our Board of Directors since August 2004 and as Vice Chairman of the Company since January 2011 and as Chairman of Harvest Capital Strategies since such time. Mr. Johnson previously served as President of the Company, from January 2007 to January 2011 and President of JMP Securities, from January 2002 until January 2007. Mr. Johnson was a founding member of Saw Island Asset Advisors, LLC, an alternative investment firm specializing in hedge fund investments, which was acquired by JMP Asset Management (now Harvest Capital Strategies) in January 2003. Prior to founding Saw Island Asset Advisors, Mr. Johnson spent 20 years, from 1980 through 2000, at Montgomery Securities, now Banc of America Securities, most recently as director of global institutional sales and a member of the firm’s Executive Committee. Mr. Johnson serves on the Board of Directors of Corticon Technology, a rules-based enterprise software platform for decision management. Mr. Johnson received a BA degree from Stanford University. The Board believes Mr. Johnson should serve as a director due to his experience in the institutional brokerage and investment banking industries and with funds of funds.

Carter D. Mack , age 50, co-founded the Company in 1999, is President of the Company and a member of our Executive Committee. Mr. Mack has served as a member of our Board of Directors since August 2004 and as our President since January 2011. Mr. Mack previously served as Director of Investment Banking and Co-President of JMP Securities from February 2007 to January 2011. Prior to co-founding the Company, Mr. Mack was a Managing Director in the financial services group at Montgomery Securities, now Banc of America Securities, for three years, where he focused on corporate finance and mergers and acquisitions for finance companies, depository institutions and other financial intermediaries. Mr. Mack also spent five years working with financial institutions in the investment banking group at Merrill Lynch, two years in corporate finance at Security Pacific Corp. and three years in strategic planning at Union Bank of California. Mr. Mack received a MBA degree from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and a BA degree from the University of California, Berkeley. The Board believes Mr. Mack should serve as a director due to his status as a founder of the Company and his experience in investment banking, particularly in financial services.

Mark L. Lehmann , age 48, joined us in October 2003 and is President of JMP Securities and a member of our Executive Committee. Mr. Lehmann has served as a member of our Board of Directors since August 2004. Mr. Lehmann previously served as Director of Equities and Co-President of JMP Securities from February 2007 to January 2011. Previously, Mr. Lehmann was a Managing Director at U.S. Bancorp Piper Jaffray, where he initiated and managed the firm’s middle-market sales effort. He previously served as both the Global Director of Institutional Sales and the Global Director of Equity Research at Banc of America Securities after serving as an institutional salesperson at the firm and its predecessor, Montgomery Securities, for 10 years. Mr. Lehmann was also a founding partner of Baypoint Trading, a provider of trading execution services to investment managers. Mr. Lehmann received a JD degree from the New York University School of Law and a BA degree from the University of Illinois. He is a certified public accountant. The Board believes Mr. Lehmann should serve as a director due to his experience in the institutional brokerage and research industries.

Glenn H. Tongue , age 53, has served as a member of our Board of Directors since August 2007. Mr. Tongue is the General Partner of Deerhaven Capital Management and the sole Portfolio Manager of the Deerhaven Fund. Previously he was a General Partner and Co-Manager of T2 Partners Management from April 2004 to July 2012 and was the co-manager of three private investment partnerships: the Tilson Growth Fund, the Tilson Offshore Fund and the T2 Qualified Fund. Prior to joining T2 Partners, Mr. Tongue spent 17 years working on Wall Street, most recently as an investment banker at UBS, where he was a Managing Director. Previously, Mr. Tongue served as President of DLJdirect, a publicly traded online brokerage firm that was spun out of the investment bank Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette in 1999. Mr. Tongue oversaw both DLJdirect’s initial public offering and its eventual sale. Additionally, Mr. Tongue was a Managing Director for 10 years in the investment banking group at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette. Mr. Tongue received a MBA degree with distinction from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and received a BS degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Princeton University. The Board believes Mr. Tongue should serve as a director due to his experience in investment banking and investment management.

Kenneth M. Karmin , age 52, has served on the Board of Directors since May 2008. Mr. Karmin has been since 1997 a principal of High Street Holdings, a diversified investment company, and has been since 1997 the Chief Executive Officer of Ortho Mattress Inc., a bedding products company servicing Southern California and select Midwestern cities. From 1993 to 1998, Mr. Karmin served as a managing director at Credit Agricole Futures, SNC in London. Mr. Karmin was also Managing Director of the financial futures and options department in the London offices of Rodman & Renshaw, Inc. prior to the acquisition of the firm’s U.K. branch by Credit Agricole. Mr. Karmin previously worked at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. in its institutional financial futures division. Mr. Karmin received an AB degree in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis. The Board believes Mr. Karmin should serve as a director due to his experience in domestic and international investment banking and diversified investment strategies.

H. Mark Lunenburg , age 53, has served on the Board of Directors since March 2009. Mr. Lunenburg is President and Managing Member of Talon Capital, LLC and has held such position since 2002. Talon Capital, LLC is an institutional money management firm founded in 2002 focusing on absolute return strategies. Mr. Lunenburg began his investment career at Kemper Corp. in 1982 as a Financial Analyst in the office of the President. Mr. Lunenburg joined Kemper Financial Services in 1984, holding various investment research positions. Mr. Lunenburg joined the Bass Brothers’ investment operations in 1987, concentrating in stock research and high-yield credit analysis. From 1990 through April of 2001, Mr. Lunenburg managed funds for Ballentine Capital Management, Inc. in Avon, Connecticut. He is currently Vice Chairman of the Board of Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and is an honorary Governor of the Hill-Stead Museum. Mr. Lunenburg graduated from San Diego State University in 1981 with a BS degree in Business Administration and is a Chartered Financial Analyst. The Board believes Mr. Lunenburg should serve as a director due to his experience in investment management and hedge funds.

David M. DiPietro , age 53, has served on the Board of Directors since December 2010. Since 2010, Mr. DiPietro has been an advisor to and investor in early stage private companies. Prior to his current position, Mr. DiPietro was President of Signal Hill Capital Group LLC, a boutique investment bank headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, where he initiated and oversaw the firm’s institutional equities business as well as its venture capital and private equity coverage initiatives. From 1999 through 2003, Mr. DiPietro was Vice Chairman of the board of directors of Deutsche Bank Securities and a member of the firm’s global operating committees for equities and private wealth management, first serving as head of North American equities and later as head of the private client division. From 1992 through 1999, he managed the equity capital markets division at Bankers Trust Company, which was acquired by Deutsche Bank in 1999, and at Alex Brown Incorporated, which was acquired by Bankers Trust Company in 1997. Mr. DiPietro previously held an equity capital markets role at Merrill Lynch and a research position at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Mr. DiPietro received a MBA degree from the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and a BA degree from Haverford College. The Board believes Mr. DiPietro should serve as a director due to his experience in the investment banking and brokerage industries.

Jonathan M. Orszag , age 39, has served on the Board of Directors since March 2011. Since January 2006, Mr. Orszag has been a senior managing director and member of the executive committee of Compass Lexecon, LLC, an economic consulting firm. In such capacity, Mr. Orszag has conducted economic and financial analysis on a wide range of complex issues in antitrust, regulatory, policy and litigation matters for corporations and public-sector entities in a variety of markets, such as the technology, telecommunications, financial services, media and sports industries. Prior to entering the private sector, Mr. Orszag served as the Assistant to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce and Director of the Office of Policy and Strategic Planning from March 1999 through March 2000. In this capacity, he was chief policy adviser to the Secretary of Commerce and was responsible for coordinating the development and implementation of policy initiatives, from telecommunications issues to international trade issues. Previously, from August 1997 through March 1999, Mr. Orszag served as an economic policy advisor on President Clinton’s National Economic Council. He is currently a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and a fellow at the University of Southern California’s Center for Communication, Law & Policy. He received a M.Sc. from Oxford University, which he attended as a Marshall Scholar, and graduated summa cum laude in economics from Princeton University. The Board believes Mr. Orszag should serve as a director due to his experience in economic and political policy matters.

There are no family relationships between any director or executive officer of the Company and any other director or executive officer of the Company.

Required Vote and Directors’ Recommendation

You may vote “FOR ALL”, “WITHHOLD ALL”, or “FOR ALL EXCEPT” with respect to any or all director nominees. The election of directors requires a plurality of the votes cast “FOR” the election of directors by shares present in person or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting; accordingly, the nine nominees receiving the highest number of votes “FOR” will be elected. Abstentions and broker non-votes, if any, will be excluded entirely from the vote and will have no effect on the outcome of the vote.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

Overview

JMP Group Inc., together with its subsidiaries (collectively, the "Company", "we", or "us") is a full-service investment banking and asset management firm headquartered in San Francisco, California. We have a diversified business model with a focus on small and middle-market companies and provide:

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investment banking, including corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions and other strategic advisory services, to corporate clients;

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sales and trading, and related brokerage services to institutional investors;

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proprietary equity research in our four target industries;

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asset management products and services to institutional investors, high net-worth individuals and for our own account;

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management of collateralized loan obligations; and

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small business lending.

Our business, by its nature, does not produce predictable earnings. Our results in any given period can be materially affected by conditions in global financial markets and economic conditions generally. For a further discussion of the factors that may affect our future operating results, see “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Components of Revenues

We derive revenues primarily from fees earned from our investment banking business, net commissions on our trading activities in our sales and trading business, asset management fees and incentive fees in our asset management business and interest income on collateralized loan obligations and small business loans we manage. We also generate revenues from principal transactions, interest, dividends, and other income.

Investment Banking

We earn investment banking revenues from underwriting securities offerings, arranging private capital market placements and providing advisory services in mergers and acquisitions and other strategic advisory assignments.

Underwriting Revenues

We earn underwriting revenues from securities offerings in which we act as an underwriter, such as initial public offerings and follow-on equity offerings. Underwriting revenues include management fees, underwriting fees, selling concessions and realized and unrealized net gains and losses on equity positions held in inventory for a period of time to facilitate the completion of certain underwritten transactions. We record underwriting revenues, net of related syndicate expenses, at the time the underwriting is completed. In syndicated underwritten transactions, management estimates our share of transaction-related expenses incurred by the syndicate, and we recognize revenues net of such expense. On final settlement by the lead manager, typically 90 days from the trade date of the transaction, we adjust these amounts to reflect the actual transaction-related expenses and our resulting underwriting fee. We receive a higher proportion of total fees in underwritten transactions in which we act as a lead manager.

Strategic Advisory Revenues

Our strategic advisory revenues primarily include success fees on closed merger and acquisition transactions, as well as retainer fees, earned in connection with advising both buyers’ and sellers’ transactions. We also earn fees for related advisory work and other services such as providing fairness opinions and valuation analyses. We record strategic advisory revenues when the transactions or the services (or, if applicable, separate components thereof) to be performed are substantially completed, the fees are determinable and collection is reasonably assured.

Private Capital Market and Other Revenues

We earn agency placement fees in non-underwritten transactions such as private placements of equity securities, private investments in public equity (“PIPE”) transactions, Rule 144A private offerings and trust preferred securities offerings. We record private placement revenues on the closing date of these transactions.

Since our investment banking revenues are generally recognized at the time of completion of each transaction or the services to be performed, these revenues typically vary between periods and may be considerably affected by the timing of the closing of significant transactions.

Brokerage Revenues

Our brokerage revenues include commissions paid by customers from brokerage transactions in exchange-listed and over-the-counter (“OTC”) equity securities. Commissions are recognized on a trade date basis. Brokerage revenues also include net trading gains and losses that result from market-making activities and from the commitment of capital to facilitate customer orders. Our brokerage revenues may vary between periods, in part depending on commission rates, trading volumes and our ability to continue to deliver research and other value-added services to our clients. The ability to execute trades electronically, through the Internet and through other alternative trading systems has increased pressure on trading commissions and spreads. We expect this trend toward alternative trading systems and pricing pressures in our brokerage business to continue. We are, to some extent, compensated through brokerage commissions for the value of research and other value added services we deliver to our clients. These “soft dollar” practices have been the subject of discussion among regulators, the investment banking community and our sales and trading clients. In particular, commission sharing arrangements have been adopted by some large institutional investors. In these arrangements, institutional investors concentrate their trading with fewer “execution” brokers and pay a fixed amount for execution with an additional amount set aside for payments to other firms for research or other brokerage services. Accordingly, we may experience reduced (or eliminated) trading volume with such investors but may be compensated for our research and sales efforts through allocations of the designated amounts. Depending on the extent to which we adopt this practice and depending on our ability to reach arrangements on terms acceptable to us, this trend would likely impair the revenues and profitability of our commission business by negatively affecting both volumes and trading commissions in our commission business.

Asset Management Fees

Asset management fees for hedge funds, hedge funds of funds, private equity funds, real estate investment trusts ("REITs") and Harvest Capital Credit ("HCC"), a small business loan investment vehicle launched in 2011, include base management fees and incentive fees earned from managing investment partnerships sponsored by us and from managing a portion of the net assets of New York Mortgage Trust, Inc. (“NYMT”) pursuant to the advisory agreement between HCS and NYMT entered into in January 2008. The advisory agreement was amended effective July 26, 2010, and under the amended advisory agreement, HCS managed certain assets of NYMT, which were subject to the base advisory fee and incentive fee calculations, and received an annual consulting fee equal to $1.0 million. The amended agreement was terminated on December 31, 2011, pending certain contingent advisory obligations. Pursuant to the terms of our former advisory relationship with NYMT, we earned base management fees on the NYMT assets that were managed by HCS at the time the advisory relationship with HCS concluded (the “Incentive Tail Assets”) until such time as such Incentive Tail Assets were disposed or mature. We earned base management fees from managing these NYMT assets through the first half of 2012. Base management fees we earn are generally based on the fair value of assets under management or aggregate capital commitments and the fee schedule for each fund and account. We also earn incentive fees that are based upon the performance of investment funds and accounts. For most of the funds, such fees are based on a percentage of the excess of an investment return over a specified highwater mark or hurdle rate over a defined performance period. For private equity funds, incentive fees are based on a specified percentage of realized gains from the disposition of each portfolio investment in which each investor participates, and are earned by the Company after returning contributions by the investors for that portfolio investment and for all other portfolio investments in which each such investor participates that have been disposed of at the time of distribution.

As of December 31, 2012, the contractual base management fees earned from each of these investment funds ranged between 1% and 2% of assets under management or were 2% of aggregate committed capital. The contractual incentive fees were generally (i) 20%, subject to high-water marks, for the hedge funds; (ii) 5% to 20%, subject to high-water marks or a performance hurdle rate, for the hedge funds of funds; (iii) 20%, subject to high-water marks, for Harvest Growth Capital LLC ("HGC") and Harvest Growth Capital II LLC ("HGC II"). Our asset management revenues are subject to fluctuations due to a variety of factors that are unpredictable, including the overall condition of the economy and the securities markets as a whole and our core sectors. These conditions can have a material effect on the inflows and outflows of assets under management, and the performance of our asset management funds. For example, a significant portion of the performance-based or incentive revenues that we recognize are based on the value of securities held in the funds we manage. The value of these securities includes unrealized gains or losses that may change from one period to another. As we consolidate HGC, HGC II and HCC, the management and incentive fees earned at HCS from HGC, HGC II and HCC are eliminated in consolidation.

Asset management fees for the CLOs the Company managed consisted of senior and subordinated base management fees. The Company recognizes base management fees for the CLO on a monthly basis over the period in which the collateral management services are performed. The base management fees for the CLOs are calculated as a percentage of the average aggregate collateral balances for a specified period. As we consolidate Cratos CLO, the management fees earned at JMPCA from Cratos CLO are eliminated on consolidation in accordance with GAAP. At December 31, 2010 and 2011, the contractual base management fees earned from the CLOs ranged from 0.40% to 0.50% of the average aggregate collateral balance for a specified period. In December 2011, one of the CLOs initiated liquidation proceedings. At December 31, 2012, the contractual base management fees earned from the CLO was 0.50% of the average aggregate collateral balance for a specified period.

Principal Transactions

Principal transaction revenues include realized and unrealized net gains and losses resulting from our principal investments, which include investments in equity and other securities for our own account, general partner investments in funds that we manage, warrants we may receive from certain investment banking assignments, as well as limited partner investments in private funds managed by third parties. In addition, we invest a portion of our capital in a portfolio of equity securities managed by HCS and in side-by-side investments in the funds managed by us. In certain cases, we also co-invest alongside our institutional clients in private transactions resulting from our investment banking business. Principal transaction revenues also include unrealized gains and losses on the private equity securities owned by HGC, two private equity funds managed by HCS which are consolidated in our financial statements, as well as unrealized gains and losses on the investments in private companies sponsored by HCS and JMP Capital LLC ("JMP Capital"), and unrealized gains and losses on the warrants, options and equity securities owned by HCC.

Gain on Sale, Payoff and Mark-to-market of Loans

Gain on sale, payoff and mark-to-market of loans consists of gains from the sale and payoff of loans collateralizing asset-backed securities at JMP Credit and small business loans at HCC. Gains are recorded when the proceeds exceed the carrying value of the loan. Gain on sale, payoff and mark-to-market of loans also consists of lower of cost or market adjustments arising from loans held for sale and fair value market adjustments of the small business loans. Losses are recorded for the loan held for sale when the carrying value exceeds fair value. Changes to the fair value of the small business loans are also recorded to this line item.

Net Dividend Income

Net dividend income comprises dividends from our investments offset by dividend expense for paying short positions in our principal investment portfolio.

Other Income

Other income includes loan restructuring fees at JMP Credit and revenues from fee sharing arrangements with, and fees earned to raise capital for third-party investment partnerships, or funds. Other income also included settlement fees from the termination of a purchased management contract.

Interest Income

Interest income primarily consists of interest income earned on loans collateralizing asset-backed securities issued, loans held for investment, and small business loans. Interest income on loans comprises the stated coupon as a percentage of the face amount receivable as well as accretion of accretable or purchase discounts and deferred fees. Interest income is recorded on the accrual basis in accordance with the terms of the respective loans unless such loans are placed on non-accrual status.

Interest Expense

Interest expense primarily consists of interest expense incurred on asset-backed securities issued and notes payable. Interest expense on asset-backed securities is the stated coupon payable as a percentage of the principal amount as well as amortization of the liquidity discount which was recorded at the acquisition date of Cratos. Interest expense is recorded on the accrual basis in accordance with the terms of the respective asset-backed securities issued and note payable.

Provision for Loan Losses

Provision for loan losses includes provision for losses recognized on our loan notes and non-revolving credit agreements at JMP Capital (collectively loans held for investment), and on loans collateralizing asset-backed securities ("ABS") at JMP Credit to record them at their estimated net realizable value. We maintain an allowance for loan losses that is intended to estimate loan losses inherent in its loan portfolio. A provision for loan losses is charged to expense to establish the allowance for loan losses. The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level, in the opinion of management, sufficient to offset estimated losses inherent in the loan portfolio as of the date of the financial statements. The appropriateness of the allowance and the allowance components are reviewed quarterly. Our estimate of each allowance component is based on observable information and on market and third-party data that we believe are reflective of the underlying loan losses being estimated.

A specific reserve is provided for loans that are considered impaired. A loan is considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. We measure impairment of a loan based upon either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral securing the loan if the loan is collateral dependent, depending on the circumstances and our collection strategy. For those loans held by Cratos at the date of acquisition by JMP Credit, and deemed impaired at that date or a subsequent date, allowance for loan losses is calculated considering two additional factors. For loans deemed impaired at the date of acquisition, if there is a further decline in expected future cash flows, this reduction is recognized as a specific reserve in accordance with the guidance above. For those loans deemed impaired subsequent to the acquisition date, if the net realizable value is lower than the current carrying value then the carrying value is reduced and the difference is booked as provision for loan losses. If the total discount from unpaid principal balance to carrying value is larger than the expected loss at the date of assessment, no provision for loan losses is recognized.

In addition, we provide an allowance on a loan by loan basis at JMP Credit for loans that were purchased after the Cratos acquisition. We employ internally developed and third-party estimation tools for measuring credit risk (loan ratings, probability of default, and exposure at default), which are used in developing an appropriate allowance for loan losses. We perform periodic detailed reviews of its loan portfolio to identify risks and to assess the overall collectability of loans.

Loans which are deemed to be uncollectible are charged off and the charged-off amount is deducted from the allowance.

Components of Expenses

We classify our expenses as compensation and benefits, administration, brokerage, clearing and exchange fees, travel and business development, communications and technology, professional fees, impairment loss on purchased management contract and other expenses. A significant portion of our expense base is variable, including compensation and benefits, brokerage and clearing and exchange fees, travel and business development and communication and technology expenses.

Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits is the largest component of our expenses and includes employees’ base pay, performance bonuses, sales commissions, related payroll taxes, medical and benefits expenses, as well as expenses for contractors, temporary employees and equity-based compensation. Our employees receive a substantial portion of their compensation in the form of individual performance-based bonuses. As is the widespread practice in our industry, we pay bonuses on an annual basis, which for senior professionals typically make up a large portion of their total compensation. To certain senior professionals, a portion of the performance-based bonuses is paid in the form of deferred compensation. Bonus payments may have a greater impact on our cash position and liquidity in the periods in which they are paid than would otherwise be reflected in our Consolidated Statements of Operations. We accrue for the estimated amount of these bonus payments ratably over the applicable service period.

Compensation is accrued using specific ratios of total compensation and benefits to total revenues based on revenue categories, as adjusted if, in management’s opinion, such adjustments are necessary and appropriate to maintain competitive compensation levels.

Administration

Administration expense primarily includes the cost of hosted conferences, non-capitalized systems and software expenditures, insurance, business tax (non-income), office supplies, recruiting and regulatory fees.

Brokerage, Clearing and Exchange Fees

Brokerage, clearing and exchange fees include the cost of floor and electronic brokerage and execution, securities clearance, and exchange fees. Effective February 23, 2011, we changed our clearing broker from Penson Financial Services Inc. to J.P. Morgan Clearing Corp. The arrangements with the new clearing broker are consistent with those of the previous clearing broker, including the indemnification agreement described in Note 17 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Changes in brokerage, clearing and exchange fees fluctuate largely in line with the volume of sales and trading activity.

Travel and Business Development

Travel and business development expense is net of expenses reimbursed by clients.

Communications and Technology

Communications and technology expense primarily relates to communication and information processing as well as the subscription of certain market data.

Professional Fees

Professional fees primarily relate to legal and accounting professional services.

Impairment Loss on Purchased Management Contract

Impairment loss on purchased management contract relates to a CLO management contract we purchased from Princeton Advisory Group, Inc. on September 8, 2010 for $3.8 million. Since a single investor had previously acquired control of the right to transfer the management contract without cause at any time with 90 days’ notice, we initially recorded an impairment charge of $2.8 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2010, and an additional impairment charge of $0.7 million in the quarter ended March 31, 2011. The CLO began liquidation proceedings in December 2011. The remaining assets were distributed in 2012.

Other Expenses

Other operating expenses primarily include occupancy, depreciation and CLO administration expense at JMP Credit.

Non-controlling Interest

Non-controlling interest for the year ended December 31, 2012 includes the interest of third parties in Cratos CLO, HGC, HGC II (effective October 1, 2012) and HCC, the partially-owned subsidiaries consolidated in our financial statements. Non-controlling interest for the year ended December 31, 2011 includes the interest of third parties in Cratos CLO, HGC, and HCC (effective August 18, 2011), the partially-owned subsidiaries consolidated in our financial statements. Non-controlling interest for year ended December 31, 2010 includes the interest of third parties in JMP Credit (through August 6, 2010), Cratos CLO (effective August 7, 2010), HMOP (through December 31, 2010) and HGC (effective April 1, 2010), the partially-owned subsidiaries consolidated in our financial statements. HMOP was liquidated on December 31, 2010, with all of its partners redeeming their interests effective that date. The assets of HMOP were distributed to its partners in January 2011.

The partnership agreements for HMOP provide for the right of the limited partners to remove the general partners by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated limited partners. We follow the authoritative guidance under GAAP regarding the determination of whether a general partner, or the general partners as a group, controls a limited partnership or similar entity when the limited partners have certain rights. Such guidance applies when a general partner controls a limited partnership and is required to consolidate the limited partnership in its financial statements. Under the guidance, the general partner in a limited partnership is presumed to control the limited partnership regardless of the extent of the general partners’ ownership interest in the limited partnership. If the limited partners have either (a) the substantive ability to liquidate the limited partnership or otherwise remove the general partner without cause or (b) substantive participating rights, the general partner does not control the limited partnership. The partnership agreements for HMOP provide for the right of the limited partners to remove the general partner by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated limited partners. Because of these substantive kick-out rights, we, as the general partner, did not control HMOP and therefore did not consolidate HMOP from January 2, 2009 through April 30, 2009. During the quarter ended June 30, 2009, several non-affiliated limited partners redeemed their interest in HMOP, and the remaining limited partners were no longer deemed to have substantive kick-out rights. As a result, we consolidated HMOP in our consolidated financial statements from May 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010.

The limited liability company agreements of HGC do not provide for the right of the members to remove the manager by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated members and therefore the manager (with a minority interest in the limited liability company) is deemed to control HGC. As a result, we consolidated HGC from its inception on April 1, 2010.

On August 6, 2010, along with individual employee security holders (the “Unitholders”) of JMP Credit, we entered into an Exchange Agreement providing for, among other things, an offer to buy the minority interest units and shares in JMP Credit held by the Unitholders in exchange for a combination of (i) restricted common stock of the Company par value $.001 per share, (ii) cash and (iii) certain Cratos CLO subordinated notes. In connection with the Exchange Agreement, we issued an aggregate of 381,310 shares of restricted stock and transferred 109 subordinated notes to the Unitholders and we received all the remaining units and shares of JMP Credit that we did not previously own. The restricted stock and the Cratos CLO notes are subject to limitations on transfer and our repurchase rights in the event of certain terminations of the Unitholder’s employment with the Company or its affiliates through June 1, 2013. As a result of the aforementioned transaction, we own 100% of JMP Credit and approximately 94% of the subordinated notes of Cratos CLO.

HCC launched on August 18, 2011 to make direct investments in the form of subordinated debt and, to a lesser extent, senior debt and minority equity investments, in privately-held U.S. small to mid-size companies. HCS acts as its investment advisor, earning a base management fee equal to 2% annually of the gross assets and an incentive fee of 20% of the net operating income above an 8% hurdle rate and 20% of realized gains net of realized and unrealized losses. JMP Credit Advisors provides HCC with its administrative services, and is reimbursed its expenses, including the allocable percentage of the compensation costs for the employees performing services under the agreement. The Company and affiliates owned approximately 59% of HCC at December 31, 2012. The Company consolidates HCC into its consolidated financial statements.

Similar to HGC, the limited liability company agreements of HGC II do not provide for the right of the members to remove the manager by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated members and therefore the manager (with a minority interest in the limited liability company) is deemed to control HGC II. As a result, we consolidated HGC II from its inception in the fourth quarter of 2012.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

Overview

JMP Group Inc., together with its subsidiaries (collectively, the "Company", "we" or "us"), is a full-service investment banking and asset management firm headquartered in San Francisco, California. We have a diversified business model with a focus on small and middle-market companies and provide:

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investment banking, including corporate finance, mergers and acquisitions and other strategic advisory services, to corporate clients;

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sales and trading, and related brokerage services to institutional investors;

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proprietary equity research in our four target industries;

•

asset management products and services to institutional investors, high net-worth individuals and for our own account; and

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management of collateralized loan obligations.


Components of Revenues

We derive revenues primarily from fees earned from our investment banking business, net commissions on our trading activities in our sales and trading business, asset management fees and incentive fees in our asset management business, and interest income on collateralized loan obligations we manage. We also generate revenues from principal transactions, interest, dividends, and other income.

Investment Banking

We earn investment banking revenues from underwriting securities offerings, arranging private capital market transactions and providing advisory services in mergers and acquisitions and other strategic advisory assignments.

Underwriting Revenues

We earn underwriting revenues from securities offerings in which we act as an underwriter, such as initial public offerings and follow-on equity offerings. Underwriting revenues include management fees, underwriting fees, selling concessions and realized and unrealized net gains and losses on equity positions held in inventory for a period of time to facilitate the completion of certain underwritten transactions. We record underwriting revenues, net of related syndicate expenses, at the time the underwriting is completed. In syndicated underwritten transactions, management estimates our share of transaction-related expenses incurred by the syndicate, and we recognize revenues net of such expense. On final settlement by the lead manager, typically 90 days from the trade date of the transaction, we adjust these amounts to reflect the actual transaction-related expenses and our resulting underwriting fee. We receive a higher proportion of total fees in underwritten transactions in which we act as a lead manager.

Strategic Advisory Revenues

Our strategic advisory revenues primarily include success fees on closed merger and acquisition transactions, as well as retainer fees, earned in connection with advising both buyers’ and sellers’ transactions. We also earn fees for related advisory work and other services such as providing fairness opinions and in valuation analyses. We record strategic advisory revenues when the transactions or the services (or, if applicable, separate components thereof) to be performed are substantially completed, the fees are determinable and collection is reasonably assured.

Private Capital Market and other Revenues

We earn agency capital market and other fees in non-underwritten transactions such as private placements of equity securities, private investments in public equity (“PIPE”) transactions, Rule 144A private offerings and trust preferred securities offerings. We record private placement revenues on the closing date of these transactions.

Since our investment banking revenues are generally recognized at the time of completion of each transaction or the services to be performed, these revenues typically vary between periods and may be considerably affected by the timing of the closing of significant transactions.

Brokerage Revenues

Our brokerage revenues include commissions paid by customers from brokerage transactions in exchange-listed and over-the-counter (“OTC”) equity securities. Commissions are recognized on a trade date basis. Brokerage revenues also include net trading gains and losses that result from market-making activities and from our commitment of capital to facilitate customer transactions. Our brokerage revenues may vary between periods, in part depending on commission rates, trading volumes and our ability to continue to deliver research and other value-added services to our clients. The ability to execute trades electronically, through the Internet and through other alternative trading systems has increased pressure on trading commissions and spreads. We expect this trend toward alternative trading systems and pricing pressures in our brokerage business to continue. We are, to some extent, compensated through brokerage commissions for the value of research and other value- added services we deliver to our clients. These “soft dollar” practices have been the subject of discussion among regulators, the investment banking community and our sales and trading clients. In particular, commission sharing arrangements have been adopted by some large institutional investors. In these arrangements, institutional investors concentrate their trading with fewer “execution” brokers and pay a fixed amount for execution with an additional amount set aside for payments to other firms for research or other brokerage services. Accordingly, we may experience reduced (or eliminated) trading volume with such investors but may be compensated for our research and sales efforts through allocations of the designated amounts. Depending on the extent to which we adopt this practice and depending on our ability to reach arrangements on terms acceptable to us, this trend would likely impair the revenues and profitability of our commission business by negatively affecting both volumes and trading commissions in our commission business.

Asset Management Fees

Asset management fees for hedge funds, hedge funds of funds, private equity funds and Harvest Capital Credit Corporation ("HCC") include base management fees and incentive fees earned from managing investment partnerships sponsored by us. Earned base management fees are generally based on the fair value of assets under management or aggregate capital commitments and the fee schedule for each fund and account. We also earn incentive fees based upon the performance of investment funds and accounts. For most of the funds, such fees are based on a percentage of the excess of an investment return over a specified high-water mark or hurdle rate over a defined performance period. For private equity funds, incentive fees are based on a specified percentage of realized gains from the disposition of each portfolio investment in which each investor participates, and we earn after returning contributions by the investors for that portfolio investment and for all other portfolio investments in which each such investor participates that have been disposed of at the time of distribution.

As of September 30, 2013, the contractual base management fees earned from each of these investment funds ranged between 1% and 2% of assets under management or were 2% of aggregate committed capital. The contractual incentive fees were generally (i) 20%, subject to high-water marks, for the hedge funds; (ii) 5% to 20%, subject to high-water marks or a performance hurdle rate, for the hedge funds of funds; (iii) 20%, subject to high-water marks, for Harvest Growth Capital LLC ("HGC") and Harvest Growth Capital II LLC ("HGC II"). Our asset management revenues are subject to fluctuations due to a variety of factors that are unpredictable, including the overall condition of the economy and the securities markets as a whole and our core sectors. These conditions can have a material effect on the inflows and outflows of assets under management, and the performance of our asset management funds. For example, a significant portion of the performance-based or incentive revenues that we recognize are based on the value of securities held in the funds we manage. The value of these securities includes unrealized gains or losses that may change from one period to another. As we consolidate HGC, HGC II and HCC LLC (through May 2, 2013), the management and incentive fees earned at HCS from HGC, HGC II, and HCC LLC (through May 2, 2013), are eliminated in consolidation.

Asset management fees for the collateralized loan obligations ("CLOs") we manage currently consist only of senior and subordinated base management fees. We recognize base management fees for the CLOs on a monthly basis over the period in which the collateral management services are performed. The base management fees for the CLOs are calculated as a percentage of the average aggregate collateral balances for a specified period. As we consolidate CLO I and CLO II, the management fees earned at JMP Credit Advisors LLC ("JMPCA") from CLO I and CLO II are eliminated on consolidation in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP"). At September 30, 2013, the contractual senior and subordinated base management fees earned from the CLO were 0.50% of the average aggregate collateral balance for a specified period.

Principal Transactions

Principal transaction revenues includes realized and unrealized net gains and losses resulting from our principal investments, which include investments in equity and other securities for our own account and as the general partner of funds managed by us, warrants we may receive from certain investment banking assignments, as well as limited partner investments in private funds managed by third parties. In addition, we invest a portion of our capital in a portfolio of equity securities managed by HCS and in side-by-side investments in the funds managed by us. In certain cases, we also co-invest alongside our institutional clients in private transactions resulting from our investment banking business. Principal transaction revenues also include unrealized gains and losses on the private equity securities owned by HGC and HGC II, two private equity funds managed by HCS which are consolidated in our financial statements, as well as unrealized gains and losses on the investments in private companies sponsored by HCS and JMP Capital LLC ("JMP Capital"), and unrealized gains and losses on the warrants, options and equity securities owned by HCC LLC.

Gain on Sale, Payoff and Mark-to-market of Loans

Gain on sale, payoff and mark-to-market of loans consists of gains from the sale and payoff of loans collateralizing asset-backed securities at JMP Credit and small business loans at HCC LLC (through May 2, 2013). Gains are recorded when the proceeds exceed the carrying value of the loan. Gain on sale, payoff and mark-to-market of loans also consists of lower of cost or market adjustments arising from loans held for sale and fair value market adjustments of the small business loans. Losses are recorded for the loan held for sale when the carrying value exceeds fair value. Changes to the fair value of the small business loans are also recorded to this line item.

Net Dividend Income

Net dividend income comprises dividends from our investments offset by dividend expense for paying short positions in our principal investment portfolio.

Other Income

Other income includes loan restructuring fees at JMP Credit, revenues from equity method investments, and revenues from fee-sharing arrangements with, and fees earned to raise capital for third-party investment partnerships, or funds. Other income also includes non-recurring revenues associated with the conclusion of HCS's advisory relationship with NYMT. Refer to Note 2 in the Company's 2012 10-K for additional information regarding the termination of the advisory agreement between HCS and NYMT.

Interest Income

Interest income primarily consists of interest income earned on loans collateralizing asset-backed securities issued, small business loans, and loans held for investment. Interest income on loans comprises the stated coupon as a percentage of the face amount receivable as well as accretion of accretable or purchase discounts and deferred fees. Interest income is recorded on the accrual basis in accordance with the terms of the respective loans unless such loans are placed on non-accrual status.

Interest Expense

Interest expense primarily consists of interest expense incurred on asset-backed securities issued and note payable, and the amortization of bond issuance costs. Interest expense on asset-backed securities is the stated coupon payable as a percentage of the principal amount as well as amortization of the liquidity discount which was recorded at the acquisition date of Cratos. Interest expense is recorded on the accrual basis in accordance with the terms of the respective asset-backed securities issued and note payable.

Provision for Loan Losses

Provision for loan losses includes provision for losses recognized on our loan notes and non-revolving credit agreements at JMP Capital (collectively loans held for investment), and on loans collateralizing asset-backed securities ("ABS") at JMP Credit to record them at their estimated net realizable value. A provision for loan losses is charged to expense to establish the allowance for loan losses. The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level, in the opinion of management, sufficient to offset estimated losses inherent in the loan portfolio as of the date of the financial statements. The appropriateness of the allowance and the allowance components are reviewed quarterly. Our estimate of each allowance component is based on observable information and on market and third-party data that we believe are reflective of the underlying loan losses being estimated.

A specific reserve is provided for loans that are considered impaired. A loan is considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. We measure impairment of a loan based upon either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s observable market price or the fair value of the collateral securing the loan if the loan is collateral dependent, depending on the circumstances and our collection strategy. For those loans held by Cratos at the date of acquisition by JMP Credit, and deemed impaired at that date or a subsequent date, allowance for loan losses is calculated considering two additional factors. For loans deemed impaired at the date of acquisition, if there is a further decline in expected future cash flows, this reduction is recognized as a specific reserve in accordance with the guidance above. For those loans deemed impaired subsequent to the acquisition date, if the net realizable value is lower than the current carrying value then the carrying value is reduced and the difference is booked as provision for loan losses. If the total discount from unpaid principal balance to carrying value is larger than the expected loss at the date of assessment, no provision for loan losses is recognized.

In addition, we provide an allowance on a loan-by-loan basis at JMP Credit for loans that were purchased after the Cratos acquisition. We employ internally developed and third-party estimation tools for measuring credit risk (loan ratings, probability of default, and exposure at default), which are used in developing an appropriate allowance for loan losses. We perform periodic detailed reviews of its loan portfolio to identify risks and to assess the overall collectability of loans.

Loans which are deemed to be uncollectible are charged off and the charged-off amount is deducted from the allowance.

Components of Expenses

We classify our expenses as compensation and benefits, administration, brokerage, clearing and exchange fees, travel and business development, communications and technology, professional fees, impairment loss on purchased management contract and other expenses. A significant portion of our expense base is variable, including compensation and benefits, brokerage clearing and exchange fees, travel and business development and communication and technology expenses.

Compensation and Benefits

Compensation and benefits is the largest component of our expenses and includes employees’ base pay, performance bonuses, sales commissions, related payroll taxes, medical and benefits expenses, as well as expenses for contractors, temporary employees and equity-based compensation. Our employees receive a substantial portion of their compensation in the form of individual performance-based bonuses. As is the widespread practice in our industry, we pay bonuses on an annual basis, which for senior professionals typically make up a large portion of their total compensation. Bonus payments may have a greater impact on our cash position and liquidity in the periods in which they are paid than would otherwise be reflected in our Consolidated Statements of Operations. We accrue for the estimated amount of these bonus payments ratably over the applicable service period.

Compensation is accrued using specific ratios of total compensation and benefits to total revenues based on revenue categories, as adjusted if, in management’s opinion, such adjustments are necessary and appropriate to maintain competitive compensation levels.

Administration

Administration expense primarily includes the cost of hosted conferences, non-capitalized systems and software expenditures, insurance, business tax (non-income), office supplies, recruiting, and regulatory fees.

Brokerage, Clearing and Exchange Fees

Brokerage, clearing and exchange fees include the cost of floor and electronic brokerage and execution, securities clearance, and exchange fees. We clear our securities transactions through J.P. Morgan Clearing Corp. Changes in brokerage, clearing and exchange fees fluctuate largely in line with the volume of sales and trading activity.

Travel and Business Development

Travel and business development expense is net of expenses reimbursed by clients.

Communications and Technology

Communications and technology expense primarily relates to communication and information processing as well as the subscription of certain market data.

Professional Fees

Professional fees primarily relate to legal and accounting professional services.

Other Expenses

Other operating expenses primarily include occupancy, depreciation and CLO administration expense at JMP Credit.

Non-controlling Interest

Non-controlling interest for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 includes the interest of third parties in CLO I, HGC and HCC LLC, partially-owned subsidiaries consolidated in our financial statements. Non-controlling interest for the nine months ended September 30, 2013 also includes the interest of third parties in HGC II, CLO II and HCAP Advisors, partially-owned subsidiaries consolidated in our financial statements.

We follow the authoritative guidance under GAAP regarding the determination of whether a general partner, or the general partners as a group, controls a limited partnership or similar entity when the limited partners have certain rights. Such guidance applies when a general partner controls a limited partnership and is required to consolidate the limited partnership in its financial statements. Under the guidance, the general partner in a limited partnership is presumed to control the limited partnership regardless of the extent of the general partners’ ownership interest in the limited partnership. If the limited partners have either (a) the substantive ability to liquidate the limited partnership or otherwise remove the general partner without cause or (b) substantive participating rights, the general partner does not control the limited partnership.

The limited liability company agreements of HGC do not provide for the right of the members to remove the manager by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated members and therefore the manager (with a minority interest in the limited liability company) is deemed to control HGC. As a result, we consolidated HGC from its inception on April 1, 2010.

Similar to HGC, the limited liability company agreements of HGC II do not provide for the right of the members to remove the manager by a simple majority vote of the non-affiliated members and therefore the manager (with a minority interest in the limited liability company) is deemed to control HGC II. As a result, we consolidated HGC II from its inception in the fourth quarter of 2012.

On August 6, 2010, along with individual employee security holders (the “Unitholders”) of JMP Credit, we entered into an Exchange Agreement providing for, among other things, an offer to buy the minority interest units and shares in JMP Credit held by the Unitholders in exchange for a combination of (i) restricted common stock of the Company par value $.001 per share, (ii) cash and (iii) certain CLO I subordinated notes. In connection with the Exchange Agreement, we issued an aggregate of 381,310 shares of restricted stock and transferred 109 subordinated notes to the Unitholders and we received all the remaining units and shares of JMP Credit that we did not previously own. The restricted stock and the CLO I notes are subject to limitations on transfer and our repurchase rights in the event of certain terminations of the Unitholder’s employment with the Company or its affiliates through June 1, 2013. As a result of the aforementioned transaction, we own 100% of JMP Credit and approximately 94% of the subordinated notes of CLO I.

On August 18, 2011, HCS entered into an investment management and advisory agreement with HCC LLC. HCC LLC makes direct investments in the form of subordinated debt and, to a lesser extent, senior debt and minority equity investments, in privately-held U.S. small to mid-size companies. HCC LLC commenced operations in September 2011. HCS acts as its investment advisor, earning a base management fee equal to 2% annually of the gross assets acquired with equity. HCS does not charge a base management fee on assets funded through the Company's line of credit. JMP Credit Advisors provided HCC LLC with its administrative services, and is reimbursed its expenses, including the allocable percentage of the compensation costs for the employees performing services under the agreement. The Company consolidated HCC LLC into its consolidated financial statements through May 2, 2013.

On April 25, 2013, HCC entered into an acquisition agreement with HCC LLC. Pursuant to this acquisition agreement, immediately prior to the election to be treated as a BDC under the 1940 Act, HCC acquired HCC LLC, and the holders of membership interests in HCC LLC received shares of HCC common stock in exchange for their interests in HCC LLC. The outstanding limited liability company units of HCC LLC were converted into a number of shares of HCC common stock. The conversion of units to shares and HCC LLC to HCC did not result in a change of control, or change in management. The conversion was a transaction to change corporate form in preparation for the IPO. HCC engaged HCAP Advisors LLC to act as its adviser. Subject to the overall supervision of the HCC independent board of directors, HCAP Advisors manages HCC's day-to-day operations and provides investment advisory services. On May 2, 2013, HCC priced its initial public offering of 3.4 million shares of its common stock at a price of $15.00 per share, raising $51.0 million in gross proceeds. The underwriters of the offering were granted a 30-day option to purchase up to an additional 433,333 shares of common stock from the company. That option was exercised on May 15, raising an additional $6.5 million. After the offering, the Company's ownership of HCC was 11.6%. The Company performed a consolidation analysis at the time of the offering. Because of its current ownership and management position, the Company deconsolidated HCC effective May 2, 2013.

On April 3, 2013, entities sponsored by JMP Group Inc. priced a $343.8 million CLO. The senior notes offered in this proposed transaction (the “Secured Notes”) were issued by JMP Credit Advisors CLO II Ltd., a special purpose Cayman vehicle, and co-issued in part by JMP Credit Advisors CLO II LLC, a special purpose Delaware vehicle, and were backed by a diversified portfolio of broadly syndicated leveraged loans. The Secured Notes were issued in multiple tranches and are rated by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services and, in respect of certain tranches, Moody's Investors Service, Inc. The Secured Notes were priced with a weighted average coupon of three-month LIBOR plus 1.86%. The Company, through a wholly-owned subsidiary, retained $17.3 million of the subordinated notes of the Issuer (the “Subordinated Notes”). The Subordinated Notes will not bear interest and will not be rated. The transaction closed on April 30, 2013. The Company manages CLO II, and owns approximately 73% of the Subordinated Notes.

HCAP Advisors was formed on December 18, 2012. HCAP Advisors appointed JMP Group LLC as its Manager effective May 1, 2013, and began offering investment advisory services. The Company owns 51% equity interest in the entity.

Results of Operations

Three Months Ended September 30, 2013 Compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2012

Overview

Total net revenues after provision for loan losses increased $16.8 million, or 89.9%, from $18.6 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to $35.4 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2013, driven by an increase in non-interest revenues of $11.2 million and net interest income of $6.1 million.

Non-interest revenues increased $11.2 million, or 55.2%, from $20.3 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to $31.5 million in the same period in 2013. This increase was primarily driven by a $6.9 million increase in investment banking revenues, a $2.6 million increase in principal transactions, and a $1.6 million increase in asset management fees.

Net interest income increased $6.1 million, or 345.9%, from $1.8 million net interest expense for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to $4.3 million net interest income for the same period in 2013. This increase in net interest income is primarily attributed to an increase in net interest earned at JMP Credit, partially offset by $1.0 million interest expense related to the bond issued in January 2013.

Provision for loan losses increased $0.6 million from a $0.1 million recovery for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to a $0.5 million provision for the quarter ended September 30, 2013. The increase was driven by general reserves recorded in connection with the loan portfolio underlying CLO II which closed in the second quarter of 2013.

Total non-interest expenses increased $7.8 million, or 33.2%, from $23.6 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to $31.5 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2013, primarily due to an increase in compensation and benefits of $7.3 million.

Net income attributable to JMP Group Inc. increased $4.6 million, or 351.6%, from a $1.3 million loss after income tax benefit of $0.9 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2012 to $3.3 million net income after income tax expense of $1.6 million for the quarter ended September 30, 2013.

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2013 Compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2012

Overview

Total net revenues after provision for loan losses increased $12.4 million, or 16.0%, from $77.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $89.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, driven by an increase in non-interest revenues of $9.3 million, an increase in net interest income of $4.3 million, partially offset by an increase in provision for loan losses of $1.3 million.

Non-interest revenues increased $9.3 million, or 11.1%, from $83.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $93.1 million in the same period in 2013. This increase was primarily due to a $14.3 million increase in investment banking, and a $4.9 million increase in asset management revenues, partially offset by a $7.5 million decrease in principal transactions.

Net interest expense decreased $4.3 million, or 77.9%, from $5.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $1.2 million for the same period in 2013. This decrease in net interest expense is primarily attributed to an increase of net interest earned at JMP Credit, partially offset by $2.6 million interest expense related to the bond issued in January 2013.
Provision for loan losses increased $1.3 million from $1.1 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $2.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013. The increase was driven by a specific reserve from one non-accrual loan held at JMP Credit recorded in the nine months ended September 30, 2013 and by the general reserve recorded in connection with the loan portfolio underlying CLO II which closed in the nine months ended September 30, 2013. The increase was partially offset by a specific reserve from one non-accrual loan held at JMP Credit recorded in the nine months ended September 30, 2012.

Total non-interest expenses increased $17.2 million, or 23.4%, from $73.8 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $91.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013, primarily due to an increase in compensation and benefits of $13.2 million and an increase in administration expenses of $2.7 million.

Net income attributable to JMP Group Inc. increased $2.7 million, or 105.3%, from a $2.6 million loss after income tax benefit of $1.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2012 to $0.1 million net income after income tax expense of $0.2 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2013.

Adjusted Operating Net Income (Non-GAAP Financial Measure)

Management uses Adjusted Operating Net Income as a non-GAAP metric when evaluating the performance of JMP Group's core business strategy and ongoing operations, as management believes that this metric appropriately illustrates the operating results of JMP Group’s core operations and business activities. Adjusted Operating Net Income is derived from our segment reported results and is the measure of segment profitability on an after-tax basis used by management to evaluate our performance. This non-GAAP measure is presented to enhance investors’ overall understanding of our current financial performance. Additionally, management believes that Adjusted Operating Net Income is a useful measure because it allows for a better evaluation of the performance of JMP Group’s ongoing business and facilitates a meaningful comparison of the company’s results in a given period to those in prior and future periods. Moreover, the company utilized Adjusted Operating Net Income as a threshold for the vesting of performance-related RSUs granted as a component of 2012 and 2013 employee bonus compensation.

Management also reviews the Operating Net Income, which differs from the Adjusted Operating Net Income, as it includes the non-cash gains and losses recognized by JMP Credit Corp due to the sale or payoff of loans originally included in the portfolio acquired by JMP Group in April 2009. As most of these items were fully accounted for as of May 1, 2013, Adjusted Operating Net Income became substantially equivalent to Operating Net Income beginning the second quarter in 2013.

Adjusted Operating Net Income should not be considered a substitute for results that are presented in a manner consistent with GAAP. A limitation of the non-GAAP financial measures presented is that, unless otherwise indicated, the adjustments concern gains, losses or expenses that JMP Group generally expects to continue to recognize, and the adjustment of these items should not be construed as an inference that these gains or expenses are unusual, infrequent or non-recurring. Therefore, management believes that both JMP Group’s GAAP measures of its financial performance and the respective non-GAAP measures should be considered together. Adjusted Operating Net Income may not be comparable to a similarly titled measure presented by other companies.

CONF CALL

Andrew Palmer
Good morning. Here with me today are Joe Jolson JMP’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and Ray Jackson our Chief Financial Officer. They are joined by Carter Mack President in JMP Group and Mark Lehmann President in JMP Securities.

Before we move on I’d like to point out some of this morning’s comments may contain forward looking statements with our future events that are out of JMP’s control. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated or implied. The discussion and the uncertainties that could affect JMP’s future performance basically the description of risk factors included in our most recent 10-K. That said I’ll turn the call over to JMP’s Chairman and CEO Joe Jolson.

Joe Jolson
Thanks Andrew and thanks to everyone listening today and for your interest in JMP Group. I’m very proud to report the JMP Securities had the best third quarter in our history driven by a 57% year-on-year increase in investment banking revenues and positive operating margin leverage. The fact that productivity was broadly diversified across our four industry verticals and by product line demonstrates the rapidly growing value of our franchise.

Having invested heavily to organically grow JMP Securities over the last four years we’re pleased to see such strong positive momentum. Excluding net investment income in corporate expenses JMP Group’s operating platform which would be JMP Securities and our three asset management managers are in $0.10 a share in the quarter compared to $0.03 a share a year ago. For the first nine month of the year platform earnings were $0.26 a share or more than twice last year’s level. Before I share some thoughts Ray will take you through few of the quarter’s financial highlights and Carter Mack will say some things about the current IPO environment. Ray?

Ray Jackson
Thanks Joe. Adjusted net revenues which exclude non-cash items and non-controlling interest was $36.2 million for the quarter and $106.3 for the nine months ended September 30. Operating net income was $2.7 million and $0.12 per share versus $3 million and $0.13 per share for the third quarter of 2012. For the nine months ended September 30th operating net income was $9.6 million or $0.43 per share compared to $10.6 million or $0.46 per share for the first nine months of 2012. Excluding a one-time asset expense of $0.03 per share related to the May IPO Harvest Capital Credit Corporation. Operating EPS for September 30th would have been $0.46 matching a total for the first nine months of last year.

In the third quarter JMP Securities contributed $0.10 per operating EPS up from $0.03 a year earlier Harvest Capital strategies made $0.02 per share in line with its earnings for the third quarter of 2012. JMP Credit produced $0.09 of operating EPS versus $0.14 a year ago. At the corporate level net expense deducted $0.09 from operating EPS while that cost a $0.06 for the third quarter 2012.

From expense stand point pro forma compensation and benefits expense which excludes on cash expense related to stock-based awards but includes any deferred compensation. As a percentage of adjusted net revenues was 69% for the third quarter and 65.8% for the first nine of the year. Our non-compensation expense ratio was 18.7% for the third quarter and 18.3% year-to-date excluding a $2.5 million one-time expense related to Harvest Capital Credit May IPO.

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