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Article by DailyStocks_admin    (02-22-08 06:50 AM)

The Daily Magic Formula Stock for 02/22/2008 is Logility Inc. According to the Magic Formula Investing Web Site, the ebit yield is 12% and the EBIT ROIC is >100 %.

Dailystocks.com only deals with facts, not biased journalism. What is a better way than to go to the SEC Filings? It's not exciting reading, but it makes you money. We cut and paste the important information from SEC filings for you to get started on your research on a specific company.


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BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Company Overview

Logility, Inc. (“Logility” or the “Company”) was incorporated as a Georgia corporation in 1996. Logility provides supply chain management (SCM) solutions to streamline and optimize the market planning, management, production, and distribution of products for manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, and retailers. The supply chain refers to the complex network of business relationships with trading partners (customers, suppliers and carriers) used to forecast, source, manufacture, store, and deliver products and services to multiple locations and customers by various modes of transportation. Supply chain operations include forecasting, demand management, supply planning, sourcing, manufacturing, logistics, warehouse management, and transportation operations both within an enterprise as well as with other business-to-business collaborative processes between customers, suppliers and carriers. Our solutions enable enterprises to increase their market visibility to build competitive advantages and increase profitability by reducing costs, increasing revenues, improving operational efficiencies and collaborating with suppliers and customers to more effectively respond to dynamic market conditions.

On September 30, 2004, we acquired certain assets and the distribution channel of privately-held Demand Management, Inc., a St. Louis-based provider of supply chain planning systems marketed under the Demand Solutions ® brand. The acquisition provided more than 800 active customers in the growing small and midsize business (SMB) market, which expanded our customer base to approximately 1,160 companies, located in 70 countries and gives us what we believe is the largest installed base of supply chain planning customers among application software vendors. We market and sell the Demand Solutions product line to the SMB market through Demand Management’s existing global value-added reseller distribution network. We offer the Logility Voyager Solutions™ suite to our target market of upper-midsize to Fortune 1000 companies with distribution-intensive supply chains.

We derive revenues primarily from three sources: software licenses, services, and maintenance. We generally determine software license fees based on the number of modules, servers, users and/or sites licensed. Services and other revenues consist primarily of fees from software implementation, training, and consulting services. We bill primarily under time and materials arrangements and recognize revenues as we perform services. Maintenance agreements typically are for a one to three year term, usually commencing the time of the initial product license. We generally bill maintenance fees annually in advance under agreements with terms of one to three years, and then recognize the resulting revenues ratably over the term of the maintenance agreement. Deferred revenues represent advance payments or billings for software licenses, services and maintenance billed in advance of the time we recognize the related revenues.

Our cost of revenues for licenses includes amortization of capitalized computer software development costs, salaries and benefits and value added reseller (VAR) commissions. Costs for maintenance and services revenues include the cost of personnel to conduct implementations, customer support and consulting, and other personnel-related expenses as well as agent commission expenses related to maintenance revenues generated by the indirect channel.

Our selling expenses generally include the salary and commissions we pay to our direct sales professionals, along with marketing, promotional, travel and associated costs. Our general and administrative expenses generally include the salary and benefits we pay to executive, corporate and support personnel, as well as office rent, utilities, communications expenses, and various professional fees.

Industry Background

In response to increasing global competition, shorter product life cycles and reduced lead times, companies are continually seeking new ways to enhance the productivity and profitability of their operations. Companies that effectively communicate, collaborate and integrate with their trading partners within the extended enterprise or “supply chain” can realize significant competitive advantages in the form of lower costs, greater customer responsiveness, reduced stock-outs, more efficient sourcing, lower inventory, synchronized supply and demand, improved transportation and logistics operations, and increased revenue. Supply chain management refers to the process of managing the complex network of relationships that organizations maintain with external trading partners (customers, suppliers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers) to source, manufacture and deliver goods and services to the end consumer. Supply chain management involves both the activities related to supplying products or services (source, make, move, buy, store, and deliver) as well as the sales and marketing activities that impact the demand for goods and services, such as new product introductions, promotions, pricing and forecasting.

Today, several market trends are driving organizations to expand collaboration with trading partners across the supply chain. Global economic conditions and competitive pressures are forcing companies to reduce costs, decrease order cycle times and improve operating efficiencies. As a result, manufacturers, distributors and retailers are increasingly under pressure to better manage the supply chain as they seek to reduce costs, improve manufacturing efficiency and accelerate logistics operations while maintaining flexibility and responsiveness to changing market conditions and specific customer demands. These pressures are compounded by the increasing complexity and globalization of the interactions among suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, retailers and consumers.

Organizations are increasingly deploying Internet-based business-to-business application solutions to address their supply chain planning and supply chain execution requirements. The supply chain planning function involves the use of information to facilitate the on-time delivery of the right products to the correct location at the right time and at the lowest cost. The planning process focuses on demand forecasting, inventory simulation, global sourcing, distribution, transportation and manufacturing planning and scheduling. Planning software is designed to increase revenues, improve forecast accuracy, optimize production scheduling, reduce inventory costs, decrease order cycle times, reduce transportation costs, and improve customer service.

The supply chain execution function addresses procuring, manufacturing, warehousing, order fulfillment and distributing products throughout the supply chain. Within the supply chain execution function, organizations are increasing their focus on the effective management of warehouse and transportation operations and the need for integration with planning and other enterprise applications, in order to increase the efficient and effective fulfillment of customer orders in both the business-to-business and the business-to-consumer sectors.

In a report entitled “Producing to Demand: A Paradigm Shift for Manufacturing,” (February 2006), a leading information technology analyst firm, AMR Research stated that “companies need to invest in global coordination and local execution to make the change from low-cost manufacturing efficiency to produce to demand. This involves blending the global coordination of their fleet of manufacturing assets, and ensuring efficiency and responsiveness from individual manufacturing sites. Whether it’s internal manufacturing or contract, both will have to perform to a new set of metrics that align their capabilities with Demand-Driven Supply Network (DDSN) objectives.”

In order to effectively manage and coordinate supply chain activities, companies require demand planning, supply chain planning, global sourcing, supply chain execution, and performance management software that provides for integrated communication, optimization and collaboration among the various constituents throughout the supply chain network. This enhanced collaboration synchronizes production and distribution plans with demand forecasts, thereby minimizing bottlenecks that lead to production delays, excess inventory and distribution network problems.

We believe that traditional enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems do not provide the visibility, depth, flexibility or synchronization required to effectively meet the demands of today’s intensely competitive global environment. Organizations are demanding supply chain solutions that are modular and scaleable to extend ERP functionality, fit the dynamic needs of their businesses, deploy quickly and deliver rapid time-to-benefit.

Additionally, market drivers for more sophisticated software are finding their way downstream. Issues that the multi-billion dollar companies faced ten years ago are impacting even the low-end of the SMB market. Increasingly, our customers now have to manage to offshore manufacturing requirements and the demands associated with selling to mass merchants. With new, more complex data management needs to monitor global supply lines and deal with the retailers’ demand for accurate forecast and supply data, the SMB market is outgrowing spreadsheets for demand planning and turning to automated supply and demand management software.

Logility Products and Services

Leveraging our supply chain management expertise, Logility has been an innovator in developing and deploying supply chain solutions, with our first Internet-based collaborative planning solution implemented in 1996. We continue to invest and expand our innovative solutions, which support the Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR ® ) standards defined by the Voluntary Interindustry Commerce Standards Association (VICS). Our systems also support other emerging collaborative supply chain management standards for transportation and distribution center management such as collaborative transportation management (CTM), and radio frequency identification (RFID), a technology that uses radio waves to uniquely identify items as well as packaging such as cartons, containers and pallets.

We believe companies in distribution-intensive industries face considerable competitive pressure, which is intensified by the high cost of inventory and distribution investments, dynamically changing consumer needs, and variability in overall supply chain performance. These companies need solutions that are capable of delivering significant financial benefits by quickly solving problems that arise in sourcing, manufacturing and distribution operations. Our solutions are capable of helping these companies collaborate with their trading partners to improve customer service and optimize their sourcing, manufacturing, inventory and distribution networks.

With approximately 1,150 customers in 70 countries, Logility is a leading provider of collaborative supply chain solutions that help small, medium, and large as well as Fortune 1000 companies realize substantial bottom-line results. We provide two product suites, Logility Voyager Solutions and Demand Solutions, marketed, sold and distributed through both direct and indirect sales channels. The Logility Voyager Solutions suite of products features performance monitoring capabilities in a single Internet-based framework and provides supply chain visibility; demand, inventory and replenishment planning; supply and global sourcing optimization; manufacturing planning and scheduling; transportation planning and execution; and warehouse management. The Demand Solutions product suite provides forecasting, demand planning, replenishment and point-of-sale analysis for maximizing profits for small to midsize manufacturing, distribution and retail operations.

We have licensed one or more modules of Logility Voyager Solutions or Demand Solutions to companies worldwide, including Armour Eckrich, Avery Dennison Corporation, Continental Mills, Cooper Industries, Farnell InOne, Hyundai Motor America, ICI Paints, Komatsu, Leviton Manufacturing Company, L’Oreal USA, Malt-O-Meal Company, Pernod-Ricard, Pfizer, Porsche, Remington Products Company, Shaw Industries, Sigma Aldrich, Standard Motor Products, The Coleman Company, Under Armour Performance Apparel, Verizon Wireless, Wacoal, Warnaco, and VF Corporation. We sell products and services through direct and indirect channels. We derived approximately 15% of our revenues in the fiscal year ended April 30, 2007 from international sales.

Product Features: Logility Voyager Solutions

Logility Voyager Solutions is an integrated software suite that provides advanced supply chain management including collaborative planning, strategic network design, optimized supply sourcing, production management, warehouse management, and collaborative logistics capabilities that are designed to increase revenues, reduce inventory costs, improve forecast accuracy, decrease order cycle times, manage global sourcing initiatives, optimize production scheduling, streamline logistics operations, reduce transportation costs and improve customer service. Logility Voyager Solutions incorporate performance management analytics to drive decision support for critical processes like demand management, inventory optimization and sales and operations planning (S&OP).

The Logility Voyager Solutions software suite is modular and scaleable to meet the management requirements of global organizations involving tens of thousands of products with a complex manufacturing or distribution network. In addition, the Voyager Solutions suite interfaces with a broad range of existing enterprise applications deployed on a variety of Internet and client/server operating environments and platforms.

Our customers can implement these modules individually, as well as in combinations or as a full solution suite. Logility Voyager Solutions support multiple communications protocols and is designed to operate with industry-standard open technologies, including leading web-based and client/server environments, such as Microsoft Windows, UNIX, and iSeries (AS/400) on Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server and DB2 databases. The following summarizes key features of the Logility Voyager Solutions product suite:

LOGILITY VOYAGER SOLUTIONS FOR COLLABORATIVE SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

These applications allow companies to plan, manage, optimize and measure their supply chain operations and strategic trading partner relationships for direct material procurement, production, logistics and customer order fulfillment. Logility Voyager Solutions provide a performance-based architecture that allows companies to manage supply chain processes on an exception basis. Companies can proactively monitor, alert, measure and resolve critical supply chain events both within their own companies and throughout the extended value chain via the Internet.

SUPPLY CHAIN COLLABORATION

Streamline Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP) and enhance strategic trading partner relationships, Logility Voyager Solutions allows companies to accelerate and manage demand plans, direct material procurement, sourcing, production and fulfillment using the power of the Internet.

Voyager Sales and Operations Planning™ enables companies to streamline and accelerate synchronizing supply and demand across global operations. With Voyager Sales and Operations Planning, companies can more easily track key performance indicators, measure and compare multiple business plans, optimize sale plans and automate data gathering and reporting.

Logility Voyager Collaborate™ enables companies to communicate easily across their organizations and share real-time supply chain information with external trading partners. With Voyager Collaborate, suppliers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers can use the power of collaborative business processes such as Sales and Operations Planning and built-in standards for Collaborative Planning, Forecasting and Replenishment (CPFR ® ) to advance enterprise wide collaboration enabled via the Internet.

Logility Voyager Fulfill™ provides a private transportation exchange that extends collaboration to carriers, customers and suppliers. Customers and suppliers can see the status of their orders and shipments in transit. Carriers can easily accept or reject loads offered, bid on loads, provide up-to-the-minute shipment information, and view the payment status of prior shipments.

DEMAND CHAIN PLANNING

Logility Voyager Solutions provide the visibility to significantly improve forecasting accuracy by creating comprehensive overviews of market demand, new product introductions, promotions and inventory policies. As a result, enterprises can build plans that are more closely attuned to the market.

Logility Voyager Demand Planning™ helps reconcile differences between high-level business planning and low-level product forecasting. Aligning inventory with customer demand, this solution makes it easier to boost service levels, shorten cycle times and reduce inventory obsolescence. Logility provides control to model each phase in a product’s sunrise-to-sunset lifecycle—including introduction, maturity, replacement, substitution and retirement—so that the right products are available at the point of customer demand. Voyager Demand Planning integrates the marketing department in real time into forecasting, distribution and logistics planning to calculate the impact of promotional plans and events.

Logility Voyager Inventory Planning™ allows enterprises to effectively measure the tradeoff of inventory investment and desired customer service levels. This solution dynamically sets time-phased inventory targets based on specific safety stock and order quantity rules.

GLOBAL SOURCING MANAGEMENT

Global Sourcing Management gives companies the freedom to cost-effectively source, manufacture and distribute anywhere in the world to gain a competitive advantage without compromising quality or product availability.

Voyager Global Sourcing automates the sourcing process via the Internet—from managing the proposal and delivering product specification package, to analyzing bids and streamlining the vendor selection process, to tracking supplier performance.

Voyager Production Visibility uses collaborative time and action calendars to monitor supplier production and quality, track milestone deliverables, gain packaging and labeling compliance and provide exception-based management of global sourcing initiatives via the Internet.

Voyager Supplier Logistics provides Advanced Ship Notice (ASN) and tracks supplier shipments from global manufacturing locations to provide businesses with greater visibility of inbound logistics and product availability.

SUPPLY CHAIN PLANNING

Logility Voyager Solutions optimize material, inventory, production and distribution assets by synchronizing supply and demand. Simultaneously, multiple supply chain planning models generate plans based on constraints as well as various sourcing, production and distribution options.

Voyager Supply Planning™ optimizes complex sourcing and production decisions to balance supply, manufacturing and distribution constraints based on corporate goals for maximizing profit or minimizing costs.

Voyager Replenishment Planning™ provides visibility of future customer demands, corresponding product and material requirements, and the actions suppliers must take to satisfy those demands.

Voyager Manufacturing Planning™ helps create valid production plans for single- or multi-site capacity constrained environments, providing lower costs, fewer setups and increased product availability.

SUPPLY CHAIN EXECUTION

Logility Voyager Solutions provide industry-leading capabilities for optimizing both warehouse and transportation operations. These solutions systematically balance logistics strategies, customer service policies, carrier effectiveness, inventory management, and radio frequency identification (RFID) solutions to boost perfect orders and spur improvements that favorably impact profitability.

Voyager WarehousePRO ® provides shipping and inventory accuracy by optimizing the flow of materials and information through distribution centers. WarehousePRO helps cut operating costs and improve productivity, increase order fill rates, optimize space utilization and improve customer service. This solution is highly flexible and quickly adapts to changing business requirements. WarehousePRO features an extensive workflow library incorporating industry-specific best-practice templates and supports RFID technology for effective warehousing techniques. With built-in standard interfaces to major radio frequency data collection systems, this software delivers more accurate inventory accountability and improved warehouse efficiency for a paperless warehouse environment.

Voyager Transportation Planning and Management™ provides a performance-driven, multi-modal solution for dramatic savings of time, effort and money. It enables automated shipment planning, shipment execution and freight accounting. User workflows, driven by exceptions, increase visibility and accelerate more proactive communications among trading partners. The Optimization Engine evaluates logical alternatives for grouping and shipping orders considering business rules, consolidation parameters, carriers, rates, and date/time requirements.

Product Features: Demand Solutions

Demand Solutions’ proven, sophisticated supply chain software provides a smooth transition from spreadsheet management to robust reporting and tracking. It’s simple to install and easy to use.

The Demand Solutions application suite makes it easier to predict future demand and make informed decisions to optimize inventory turns, customer service levels and profitability. Demand Solutions is a complete time-phased, multi-tiered planning and replenishment system and a proven platform for Vendor Managed Inventory. Demand Solutions helps manufacturers, wholesalers and distributors exchange information for inventory, proactively manage demand rather than operate in reactive mode, and increase profitability.

DS Forecast Management provides a powerful yet easy to use demand planning solution that fits virtually any industry and deploys quickly. The system offers significant flexibility and allows the user to select the forecasting formula which best addresses each item’s demand pattern to predict an accurate forecast of future demand.

DS Requirements Planning incorporates collaborative planning capabilities to streamline supply activities from the production line through delivery. With instant analysis of the projected demand for unlimited items against current inventory, DS Requirements Planning recommends the ideal inventory level for each ship-to location, providing valuable visibility up and down the supply chain.

DS Collaboration offers a certified CPFR compliant collaborative planning solution that streamlines communications between a company and its customers and suppliers. This solution minimizes the barriers to entry for smaller trading partners, who need only a Web browser, and extends the value available through the entire Demand Solutions product line. Collaboration results in greater demand visibility and closer synchronization of production and inventory investments.

DS Sales & Operations Planning automates and continually analyzes the annual business planning process. There are two annual business plans available for each of the sections of data (bookings, sales, production, inventory, backlog and shipments): the Annual Plan and the Flexible Plan.

DS Rough Cut dramatically increases the accuracy of available-to-promise (ATP) ratios and can reduce the cost of manual processes and calculations. It provides visibility of resource utilization and allows users to level the plan instantly. DS Rough Cut ’s powerful “what if” scenarios help ensure that businesses can meet demand as promised.

DS View significantly extends the value of Demand Solutions , empowering users to aggregate, rotate, filter, sort and otherwise manipulate large volumes of data into meaningful information. DS View can gather data from any field within Demand Solutions, as well as external sources. Enterprises can also share output with colleagues, customers and vendors over networks, captive and secure Intranets and The Internet.

DS Retail Planning enables manufacturers, distributors and retailers to collaboratively produce, ship and replenish product based on point-of-sale data. Highly accurate and easy to use, Demand Solutions Stores can track thousands of SKUs in more than a hundred locations, resulting in optimized store-level replenishment, reduced out-of-stocks, greater inventory turns, elevated customer service levels and increased profits. DS Retail Planning is designed around the philosophy of continuous replenishment, enabling actual demand to be consolidated from each point-of-sale (POS) location and routed to suppliers. D S Retail Planning leverages detailed analysis and strategic assortment planning for a store or group of stores. The result is a collaborative, highly responsive value chain from manufacturer or distributor to retail.

No single customer accounted for 10% or more of our total revenues during fiscal year 2007. We typically experience a slight degree of seasonality, reflected in a slowing of services revenues during the annual winter holiday season, which occurs in the third quarter of our fiscal year. We are not reliant on government-sector customers.

Sales and Marketing

We develop and market both the Logility Voyager Solutions and the Demand Solutions product suites through both direct and indirect sales channels. We conduct our principal sales and marketing activities from corporate headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia, and in St. Louis, Missouri where Demand Management, Inc., our wholly-owned subsidiary, is located. We have sales and/or support offices in Boston, Chicago, Dallas, and Pittsburgh. We manage sales channels outside of North America from our international offices in the United Kingdom and Spain.

We have a number of marketing alliances, including those with IBM and SAP. Generally, these marketing alliance agreements provide the vendors with non-exclusive rights to market our products and access to our marketing materials and product training. Some highlights of these agreements are as follows:


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IBM —we entered into an agreement with IBM on March 17, 2000 pursuant to which we modified our Supply Chain products, with IBM’s technical and financial assistance, to operate with IBM’s eServer iSeries (AS/400) platform. Also, we agreed to market and support the IBM-compatible supply chain products that resulted from our efforts. IBM may also market our supply chain products and refer potential customers to us.


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SAP —On January 23, 2006, we were named a SAP ® Business One Partner to provide supply chain solutions for the small and midsize business market in the United States. We have integrated our Demand Solutions application suite with SAP Business One to drive supply chain improvements for small and midsize businesses (SMB). Demand Solutions dovetails with SAP Business One’s solution extending the core business automation capabilities of SAP Business One and provides critical supply chain expertise to help customers predict future demand and make informed decisions to optimize inventory turns, customer service levels and profitability.

In addition to these marketing alliances, we have developed a network of agents who assist in selling our products globally. We intend to utilize these and future relationships with software and service organizations to enhance our sales and marketing position. These independent distributors and resellers, located in North America, South America, Mexico, Europe and the Asia/Pacific region, distribute our product lines in foreign countries. These vendors typically sell their own consulting and systems integration services in conjunction with licensing our products. Our global distribution channel consists of 23 organizations with sales, implementation and support resources serving customers in 70 countries.

We support our sales activities by conducting a variety of marketing programs including public relations, direct marketing, advertising, trade shows, product seminars, industry speakers, user group conferences and ongoing customer communication and industry analysts programs. We also participate in industry conferences such as those organized by the American Production and Inventory Control Specialists (APICS) and the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSMCP), formerly called the Council of Logistics Management (CLM).

Licenses

Like many business application software firms, our software revenue consists principally of fees generated from licensing our software products. In consideration of the payment of license fees, we typically grant nonexclusive, nontransferable, perpetual licenses, which are primarily business unit, user-specific and geographically restricted. Our standard license agreement contains provisions designed to prevent disclosure and unauthorized use of our software. In these agreements we warrant that our products will function in accordance with the specifications set forth in our product documentation. A large portion of the license fee is generally payable upon the delivery of the licensed system which includes software and product documentation, with the balance due upon installation.

The prices for our products are typically functions of the number of modules licensed and the number of servers, users and sites for which the solution is designed and deployed.

Customer Service and Support

We provide the following services and support to our customers:

Implementation Support: We offer our customers a professional and proven implementation program that facilitates rapid implementation of our software products. Our consultants help customers define the nature of their project, and subsequently proceed through the implementation process. We provide training for all users and managers involved. We first establish measurable financial and logistical performance indicators, and then evaluate them for conformance during and after implementation. Additional services beyond implementation can include post-implementation reviews and benchmarks to further enhance the benefits to customers.

Implementation: General Training Services. We offer our customers post-delivery professional services consisting primarily of implementation and training services, for which we typically charge on a daily basis. Customers that purchase implementation services receive assistance in integrating our solution with existing software applications and databases. Implementation of Logility Voyager Solutions typically requires three to nine months, depending on factors such as the complexity of a customer’s existing systems, the number of modules purchased, and the number of end users.

Product Maintenance and Updates: Support Services. We provide our customers with ongoing product support services. Typically, we enter into support or maintenance contracts with customers for an initial one to three year term, billed annually in advance, at the time of the product license with renewal for additional periods thereafter. Under these contracts, we provide telephone consulting, product updates and releases of new versions of products previously purchased by the customer, as well as error reporting and correction services. We provide ongoing support and maintenance services on a seven-day-a-week, 24-hours-a-day basis through telephone, electronic mail and web-based support, using a call logging and tracking system for quality assurance.


CEO BACKGROUND

J. Michael Edenfield , age 49, has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company since January 1997. He also serves as a director of INSIGHT, Inc., in which the Company owns a minority interest. Until the Company’s initial public offering in October 1997, he served as Chief Operating Officer of American Software, Inc., a position he had held since June 1994. Mr. Edenfield has served as Executive Vice President of American Software from June 1994 to the present, and has been a Director of American Software, Inc. since 2001. Prior to June 1994, Mr. Edenfield served in the following positions with American Software USA, Inc.: Senior Vice President of North American Sales and Marketing from July 1993 to June 1994, Senior Vice President of North American Sales from August 1992 to July 1993, Group Vice President from May 1991 to August 1992 and Regional Vice President from May 1987 to May 1991. Mr. Edenfield holds a Bachelor of Industrial Management degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Mr. Edenfield is the son of James C. Edenfield, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company. Mr. Edenfield first became a director of the Company in 1997.

John A. White , age 67, is Chancellor of the University of Arkansas, a position he has held since July 1997. A graduate of the University of Arkansas (BSIE), Virginia Tech (MSIE) and The Ohio State University (PhD), he also holds honorary doctorates from the Katholieke Universitiet of Leuven in Belgium and from George Washington University. Dr. White is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a past President of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and past Chairman of the American Association of Engineering Societies. He also serves on the boards of directors and chairs the audit committees of Motorola, Inc. and J.B. Hunt Transport Services, Inc. Dr. White founded SysteCon, a logistics consulting firm, and served as its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer until its acquisition by Coopers and Lybrand. Dr. White first became a director of the Company in 1997.

James C. Edenfield, age 72, has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company since January 1997. He is a co-founder of American Software, where he has served as Chief Executive Officer and Director since 1971. Prior to founding American Software, Mr. Edenfield held several executive positions at, and was a director of, Management Science America, Inc., an applications software development and sales company. He holds a Bachelor of Industrial Engineering degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Mr. Edenfield first became a director of the Company in 1997.

Frederick E. Cooper , age 65, has been Chairman of Cooper Capital, LLC, a private investment firm that he founded. Prior to joining Cooper Capital, Mr. Cooper was Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of CooperSmith, Inc., a producer and distributor of baked goods, which was sold to The Earthgrains Company in January 1998. Prior thereto, Mr. Cooper served for 16 years with Flowers Industries, Inc., a Fortune 500 food company, holding the positions of President and Vice Chairman and Executive Vice President and General Counsel. Mr. Cooper earned his B.A. in 1964 from Washington & Lee University and his J.D. in 1967 from the University of Georgia School of Law. Mr. Cooper first became a director of the Company in 1999.

Parker H. Petit , age 67, was the founder of Healthdyne, Inc. and served as its Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer from 1970 until 1996 when a subsidiary of Healthdyne, Inc. merged with Tokos Medical Corporation to form Matria Healthcare, Inc. (“Matria”), a comprehensive disease management services company, at which time he became Chairman of Matria. He has served as Chairman, President and CEO of Matria since 2000. Mr. Petit also serves as a member of the Board of Directors of Intelligent Systems Corporation. He is also a director of the Georgia Research Alliance, a coalition of government and industry leaders formed to encourage development of high technology business in Georgia, and has been elected to the Georgia Technology Hall of Fame. Mr. Petit first became a director of the Company in 1997.

COMPENSATION

Oversight of Compensation Program

The Compensation Committee of the Board (the “Committee”) is responsible for establishing and reviewing the overall compensation philosophy of the Company. The Committee and the Chief Executive Officer together review and establish executive compensation plans. The Committee and the Chief Executive Officer share these responsibilities in the manner described below.

Role of Compensation Committee . The Committee reviews and establishes all elements of compensation of the Chief Executive Officer. The Committee also reviews and consults with the Chief Executive Officer about salaries and other compensation of the other executive officers and acts as the stock option committee with respect to stock option grants to all executive officers, including the Chief Executive Officer. In making decisions about stock option grants, the Committee obtains from American Software information about, and takes into consideration, stock option grants made or proposed to be made by American Software under its own stock option plan to the named executive officers of the Company.

Role of Chief Executive Officer . The Chief Executive Officer reviews and establishes all non-equity related elements of compensation of the executive officers of the Company and its subsidiaries, other than his own compensation. With respect to the major elements of executive compensation plans, the Chief Executive Officer consults with and seeks input from the Committee. The Chief Executive Officer has no direct authority in connection with stock option or stock appreciation rights awards to executive officers, but makes recommendations to the Committee regarding levels of awards to specific individuals.

J. Michael Edenfield . J. Michael Edenfield is Chief Executive Officer of the Company and also serves as Executive Vice President of American Software, which owns 88% of the common stock the Company. American Software’s common stock is publicly held and is listed on the Nasdaq Stock Market. As Mr. Edenfield’s day-to-day responsibilities focus primarily on Logility, the Compensation Committee of the Logility board of directors, by mutual agreement between the Company and American Software, has assumed responsibility for establishing most of the primary elements of his compensation, including his salary, annual bonus plan, participation in the Logility stock option plan and other employee benefits. The American Software compensation committee retains the authority to grant stock options to Mr. Edenfield under the American Software stock option plan, and communicates with the Logility compensation committee in order to coordinate stock option decisions.

Vincent C. Klinges . Vincent Klinges serves both as our Chief Financial Officer and as Chief Financial Officer of American Software. By mutual agreement between the Company and American Software, American Software establishes Mr. Klinges’ salary, annual bonus plan, participation in American Software’s stock option plan and other employee benefits. The Logility compensation committee retains the authority to grant stock options to Mr. Klinges under the Logility option plan, and communicates with the American Software compensation committee in order to coordinate stock option decisions.

Executive Compensation Philosophy

We believe that a compensation program which promotes our ability to attract, retain and motivate outstanding executives will help us meet our long-range objectives, thereby serving the interests of the Company’s shareholders. Our executive officer compensation program is designed to achieve these objectives:


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Provide compensation opportunities that are competitive with those of companies of a similar size.


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Create a strong connection between executives’ compensation and our annual and long-term financial performance.


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Include above-average elements of financial risk through performance-based incentive compensation that offers an opportunity for above-average financial reward to executives.


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Design incentive compensation benchmarks that closely align the interests of executive officers with those of our stockholders.

Elements of Compensation

Base Salaries. We establish the salaries of our named executive officers at levels that we believe are, when viewed in conjunction with their potential bonus income and stock option grants, competitive and reasonable in light of their experience, prior performance and level of responsibility. The Committee reviews and establishes the salary of our Chief Executive Officer, while the Chief Executive Officer reviews and establishes the salaries of our other officers, including the named executive officers, except that the compensation committee of the American Software Board of Directors establishes the salary of our Chief Financial Officer, Vincent C. Klinges, who also is a named executive officer of American Software.

Salaries of our named executive officers in fiscal 2007 are shown in the “Salary” column of the Summary Compensation Table, below.

Incentive Compensation . Each of our named executive officers has a bonus plan established during the first quarter of a fiscal year, covering that fiscal year. The Committee establishes the bonus plan for our Chief Executive Officer. Our Chief Executive Officer establishes the bonus plans for our other officers, including the other named executive officers, except that the compensation committee of the American Software Board of Directors establishes the bonus plan for our Chief Executive Officer, Vincent C. Klinges. In each case, the bonus plan is customized for the individual executive officer. We use these bonus plans, in tandem with stock option grants, as tools to attract and retain qualified executives while at the same time aligning their interests with those of our stockholders. To accomplish this, we establish bonus plans with attainable goals, using formulas tied to important factors that positively affect return on investment.

The following summarizes the incentive compensation arrangements for the named executive officers in the fiscal years ended April 30, 2007 and 2008:

J. Michael Edenfield . For fiscal 2007, the Committee established his base salary at $275,000 and approved certain perquisites, as set forth in the Summary Compensation Table, above. The Committee and Mr. Edenfield also agreed that he would have the opportunity to receive a bonus targeted at $350,000, based upon the Company’s achieving a specified target level of operating earnings, with a total potential bonus of $550,000. Based upon operating earnings actually achieved during fiscal 2007, Mr. Edenfield received a bonus of $389,266. For fiscal 2008, the Committee has established an incentive compensation plan for Mr. Edenfield similar to the plan in effect for fiscal 2007, providing for higher benchmark targets and a potential bonus targeted at $370,000, based upon the Company’s achieving a specified target level of operating earnings, with a total potential bonus of $600,000.

H. Allan Dow . For fiscal 2007, the Company established an incentive compensation plan whereby Mr. Dow was eligible for a potential bonus targeted at $220,000, based upon the Company’s achieving specified target levels of license fee revenues and operating earnings. Based upon results achieved during fiscal 2007, he received a bonus of $115,428. For fiscal 2008, the Company has established an incentive compensation plan for Mr. Dow similar to the plan in effect for fiscal 2007, providing for higher benchmark targets and a potential bonus targeted at $240,000.

Vincent C. Klinges . For fiscal 2007, Mr. Klinges received a bonus equal to 2.25% of the increase in operating profit of American Software in fiscal 2007 over fiscal 2006, excluding stock option-related expenses, with a maximum bonus of $60,000 and a minimum bonus of $7,500, provided that he remained with the Company on May 30, 2007. For fiscal 2008, his bonus arrangement remains the same, except that the maximum bonus is increased to $75,000 and the minimum bonus is increased to $9,000, and his continuation requirement is extended to June 30, 2008.

Donald L. Thomas . For fiscal 2007, the Company established an incentive compensation plan whereby Mr. Thomas was eligible for a potential bonus targeted at $55,000, based upon the Company’s achieving specified target levels of services and maintenance revenues (excluding Distribution Management license fees) and operating earnings. Based upon results achieved during fiscal 2007, he received a bonus of $45,229. For fiscal 2008, the Company has established an incentive compensation plan for Mr. Thomas similar to the plan in effect for fiscal 2007, providing for higher benchmark targets and a potential bonus targeted at $60,000.

Bonuses paid to our named executive officers in fiscal 2007 are shown in the “Bonuses” column of the Summary Compensation Table, below.

Stock Option Plan . The Committee, which is responsible for grants of stock options to the named executive officers, believes that granting stock options to executive officers is an effective means to reward them for their prior performance, to serve as incentive for promotion of Company profitability and other long-term objectives, and to maintain their overall compensation at competitive levels. Thus, option grants reflect both a retrospective and prospective approach to executive compensation. As compared to executive bonus plans, stock options address longer term compensation and incentives. To establish option grant levels, the Committee has monitored developments and trends among publicly held technology companies regarding equity and non-equity based incentive compensation. The Committee continues to believe that stock options represent the most efficient and effective means for the Company to achieve the compensatory and incentive objectives referred to above. The Compensation Committee has the authority, under both the current and proposed Stock Plans, to award stock appreciation rights (SARs) in addition to stock options. To date, the Committee has not awarded any SARs.

The Committee typically grants stock options to executive officers once annually, typically during the months of June or July, while the salary and bonus plans for executives are being considered and finalized. The option exercise prices are fixed as of the close of trading of our common stock on Nasdaq on the date on which the Committee meets to finalize its option decisions, which is the date of grant. Options granted to executives during fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2008 have terms of six years and vest ratably over a five-year period.

Personal Benefits and Perquisites. We provide a variety of health, retirement and other benefits to all employees. Our executive officers are eligible to participate in the benefit plans on the same basis as all other employees. These benefit plans include medical, dental, life and disability insurance. Our executive officers do not receive any personal benefits or perquisites that are not available on a non-discriminatory basis to all employees except for limited supplemental insurance expense reimbursement and except for perquisites that the Committee has approved for J. Michael Edenfield. The perquisites of the named executive officers in fiscal 2007 were as set forth in the “All Other Compensation” column and footnote 2 to the Summary Compensation Table, below.

Pension Benefits. We do not provide pension benefit plans to our employees or to our named executive officers.

Non-Qualified Defined Contribution or Other Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation Plans . We do not provide non-qualified contribution plans or other non-qualified deferred compensation options to any of our employees or to our named executive officers.

Stock Purchase Plan. We formerly had in place a stock purchase plan for our employees, providing to them an opportunity to acquire our shares at a discount to market prices. We discontinued this plan several years ago after concluding that the cost of maintaining and accounting for such a plan exceeded the benefit that we perceived our employees gained from such a plan.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FROM LATEST 10K

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

We have based the following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations on our financial statements, which we have prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities, at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Note 1 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2007 describes the significant accounting policies that we have used in preparing our financial statements. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates including, but not limited to, those related to revenue/vendor specific object evidence (VSOE), bad debts, capitalized software costs, goodwill, intangible asset impairment, income taxes and contingencies. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Our actual results could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

We believe the critical accounting policies listed below affect significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of the financial statements.

Revenue Recognition. We recognize revenue in accordance with Statement of Position (SOP) 97-2, Software Revenue Recognition, and SOP 98-9, Software Revenue Recognition with Respect to Certain Transactions. We recognize license revenues in connection with license agreements for standard proprietary software upon delivery of the software, provided we deem collection to be probable, the fee is fixed or determinable, there is evidence of an arrangement, and vendor specific objective evidence exists with respect to any undelivered elements of the arrangement. We generally bill maintenance fees annually in advance and recognize the resulting revenues ratably over the term of the maintenance agreement. We derive revenues from services which primarily include consulting, implementation, and training. We bill for these services primarily under time and materials arrangements and recognize fees as we perform the services. Deferred revenues represent advance payments or billings for software licenses, services, and maintenance billed in advance of the time we recognize revenues. We record revenues from sales of third-party products in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force Issue 99-19, Reporting Revenue Gross as a Principal versus Net as an Agent (EITF 99-19) . Furthermore, in accordance with EITF 99-19, we evaluate sales through our indirect channel on a case-by-case basis to determine whether the transaction should be recorded gross or net, including but not limited to assessing whether or not the company 1) acts as principal in the transaction, 2) takes title to the products, 3) has risks and rewards of ownership, such as the risk of loss for collection, delivery, or returns, and 4) acts as an agent or broker with compensation on a commission or fee basis. Accordingly, our sales through the DMI channel are typically recorded gross.

Generally, our software products do not require significant modification or customization. Installation of the products is routine and is not essential to the functionality of the product. Our sales frequently include maintenance contracts and professional services with the sale of our software licenses. We have established vendor-specific objective evidence of fair value (VSOE) for our maintenance contracts and professional services. We determine fair value based upon the prices we charge to customers when we sell these elements separately. We defer maintenance revenues, including those sold with the initial license fee, based on VSOE, and recognize the revenue ratably over the maintenance contract period. We recognize consulting and training service revenues, including those sold with license fees, as we perform the services based on their established VSOE. We determine the amount of revenue we allocate to the licenses sold with services or maintenance using the “residual method” of accounting. Under the residual method, we allocate the total value of the arrangement first to the undelivered elements based on their VSOE and allocate the remainder to license fees.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts. We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of customers to make required payments. If the financial condition of these customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, we may require additional allowances or we may defer revenue until we determine that collectibility is probable. We specifically analyze accounts receivable and historical bad debts, customer creditworthiness, current economic trends and changes in customer payment terms when we evaluate the adequacy of the allowance for doubtful accounts.

Valuation of Long-Lived and Intangible Assets. In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets (“SFAS No. 142”), we do not amortize goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite lives. Our goodwill is subject to annual impairment tests, which require us to estimate the fair value of our business compared to the carrying value. The impairment reviews require an analysis of future projections and assumptions about our operating performance. Should such review indicate the assets are impaired, we would record an expense for the impaired assets.

In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets, (“SFAS No. 144”), long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and intangible assets, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicated that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability would be measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of an asset exceeds its estimated future cash flows, an impairment charge is recognized in the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. The determination of estimated future cash flows, however, requires management to make estimates. Future events and changes in circumstances may require us to record a significant impairment charge in the period in which such events or changes occur. Impairment testing requires considerable analysis and judgment in determining results. If other assumptions and estimates were used in our evaluations, the results could differ materially.

Annual tests or other future events could cause us to conclude that impairment indicators exist and that our goodwill and intangible assets are impaired. For example, if we had reason to believe that our recorded goodwill and intangible assets had become impaired due to decreases in the fair market value of the underlying business, we would have to take a charge to income for that portion of goodwill or intangible assets that we believed was impaired. Any resulting impairment loss could have a material adverse impact on our financial position and results of operations. At April 30, 2007, our goodwill balance was $5.8 million and our intangible assets with definite lives balance was $1.3 million, net of accumulated amortization.

Valuation of Capitalized Software Assets. We capitalize certain computer software development costs in accordance with SFAS No. 86, Accounting for the Costs of Computer Software to Be Sold, Leased, or Otherwise Marketed . Costs incurred internally to create a computer software product or to develop an enhancement to an existing product are charged to expense when incurred as research and development expense until technological feasibility for the respective product is established. Thereafter, all software development costs are capitalized and reported at the lower of unamortized cost or net realizable value. Capitalization ceases when the product or enhancement is available for general release to customers. We make ongoing evaluations of the recoverability of our capitalized software projects by comparing the amount capitalized for each product to the estimated net realizable value of the product. If such evaluations indicate that the unamortized software development costs exceed the net realizable value, we write-off the amount by which the unamortized software development costs exceed net realizable value. Capitalized computer software development costs are being amortized ratably based on the projected revenues associated with the related software or on a straight-line basis over three years, whichever method results in a higher level of amortization. At April 30, 2007, our capitalized computed software balance was $6.0 million, net of accumulated amortization.

Income Taxes . We provide for the effect of income taxes on our financial position and results of operations in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes. Under this accounting pronouncement, income tax expense is recognized for the amount of income taxes payable or refundable for the current year and for the change in net deferred tax assets or liabilities resulting from events that are recorded for financial reporting purposes in a different reporting period than recorded in the tax return. Management must make significant assumptions, judgments and estimates to determine our current provision for income taxes and also our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance to be recorded against our deferred tax assets. Our judgments, assumptions and estimates relative to the current provision for income tax take into account current tax laws, our interpretation of current tax laws, allowable deductions, tax planning strategies, projected tax credits and possible outcomes of current and future audits conducted by foreign and domestic tax authorities. Changes in tax law or our interpretation of tax laws and the resolution of current and future tax audits could significantly impact the amounts provided for income taxes in our financial position and results of operations. Our assumptions, judgments and estimates relative to the value of our deferred tax assets take into account our expectations of the amount and category of future taxable income. Actual operating results and the underlying amount and category of income in future years, which could significantly increase tax expense, could render inaccurate our current assumptions, judgments and estimates of recoverable deferred taxes.

Economic Overview

Corporate capital spending trends and commitments are the primary determinants of the size of the market for business software. Corporate capital spending is, in turn, a function of general economic conditions in the U.S. and abroad. In recent years, the overall information technology spending is relatively weak when compared to the period prior to the last economic downturn.

However, we believe information technology spending has incrementally improved in the recent years due to increased global competition forces companies to improve productivity by upgrading their technology environment systems. Although this improvement could slow or regress at any time, we believe that our organizational and financial structure will enable us to take advantage of any sustained economic rebound. While our sales pipelines have improved, customers continue to take longer to evaluate discretionary software purchases than generally was the case prior to the economic downturn.

We currently view the following factors as the primary opportunities and risks associated with our business:


•

The opportunity to expand the depth and number of strategic relationships with leading enterprise software providers, systems integrators and service providers to integrate our software solutions into their services and products and to create joint marketing opportunities; we currently have a number of marketing alliances, including those with IBM, and SAP;


•

The opportunity for select acquisitions or investments to provide opportunities to expand our sales distribution channels and/or broaden our product offering by providing additional solutions for our target markets;


•

Our dependence on, and the risks associated with, the capital spending patterns of U.S. and international businesses, which in turn are functions of economic trends and conditions over which we have no control;


•

The risk that our competitors may develop technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our technology; and


•

The risks inherent in the market for business application software and related services, which has been and continues to be intensely competitive; some of our competitors may become more aggressive with their prices and/or payment terms, which may adversely affect our profit margins.

For more information, please see “Risk Factors” in Item 1A above.

Business Acquisition

On September 30, 2004, we acquired certain assets and the distribution channel of privately-held Demand Management, Inc., (DMI) a St. Louis-based provider of supply chain planning systems marketed under the Demand Solutions ® brand. The acquisition provided more than 800 active customers in the growing small and midsize business (SMB) market, which brought our customer base at that time to approximately 1,100 companies, located in 70 countries. We believe we have the largest installed base of supply chain planning customers among application software vendors. We market and sell the Demand Solutions product line to the SMB market through Demand Management’s global value-added reseller distribution network. We also offer the Logility Voyager Solutions™ suite to our target market of upper-midsize to Fortune 1000 companies with distribution-intensive supply chains.

Recent Developments

Adoption of SFAS 123(R). Prior to May 1, 2006, we accounted for our employee stock option plan under the recognition and measurement provisions of APB Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” and related interpretations, as permitted by SFAS 123, “ Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation .” Substantially no stock-based employee compensation cost related to stock options was recognized in the consolidated statements of operations for periods prior to May 1, 2006, as all stock options granted had an exercise price equal to the market value of the underlying common stock on the date of grant.

Effective May 1, 2006, we adopted the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS 123(R) using the modified prospective transition method. Under that transition method, compensation cost recognized on or after May 1, 2006 includes: (a) compensation cost for all share-based payments granted prior to, but not yet vested as of May 1, 2006, based on the grant-date fair value estimated in accordance with the original provisions of SFAS 123, and (b) compensation cost for all share-based payments granted subsequent to May 1, 2006, based on the grant-date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123(R). Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123(R), we presented all tax benefits of deductions resulting from the exercise of stock options as operating cash flows in the consolidated statement of cash flows. SFAS 123(R) requires that cash flows resulting from the tax benefits generated by tax deductions in excess of the compensation cost recognized for those options (excess tax benefits) to be classified as financing cash flows.

As a result of adopting SFAS 123(R) on May 1, 2006, our earnings before income taxes and net earnings for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2007 were lower by $377,000, with related income tax benefit of $45,000, than they would have been if we had continued to account for share-based compensation under APB Opinion No. 25.

The fair value of options granted is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model based on certain assumptions, including the expected term of the option, the expected volatility of the price of the underlying share for the expected term of the option, the expected dividends on the underlying share for the expected term, and the risk-free interest rate for the expected term of the option. Expected volatilities are based on historical volatility of our stock or the stock of our parent, ASI, for the period previous to our incorporation in fiscal 1997. We applied the short cut method as prescribed in SAB No. 107, Share-Based Payment , to estimate the term that options are expected to be outstanding and used historical data to estimate the forfeiture rate of options granted. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yields in effect at the time of the grant with a term approximating the expected term. Options issued after May 1, 2006 with graded vesting are valued as a single award. The total value of the award is expensed on a straight line basis over the vesting period with the amount of compensation cost recognized at any date at least equal to the portion of the grant date value of the award that is vested at that date. During the year ended April 30, 2007 and 2006, we issued 50,261 and 188,456 shares of common stock, respectively, resulting from the exercise of stock options. The total intrinsic value of options exercised during the years ended April 30, 2007 and 2006 based on market value at the exercise dates was $284,972 and $1,097,466, respectively. As of April 30, 2007, unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested stock option awards totaled approximately $702,000 and is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of two years.

In September 2006, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) issued Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) Topic 1N, “Financial Statements—Considering the Effects of Prior Year Misstatements when Quantifying Misstatements in Current Year Financial Statements” (“SAB 108”), which expresses the Staff’s views regarding the process of quantifying financial statement misstatements due to the current diversity in practice. SAB 108 requires companies to use two approaches when quantifying financial statement misstatements. We have adopted SAB 108 for the year ending April 30, 2007. This issue did not have a material impact on its 2007 consolidated financial statements.

MANAGEMENT DISCUSSION FOR LATEST QUARTER

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Corporate capital spending trends and commitments are the primary determinants of the size of the market for business software. Corporate capital spending is, in turn, a function of general economic conditions in the U.S. and abroad. In recent years, the weakness in the overall world economy, and the U.S. economy in particular, has resulted in reduced expenditures in the business software market. Overall information technology spending continues to be relatively weak when compared to the period prior to the last economic downturn.

However, we believe information technology spending has incrementally improved and should continue to improve as increased global competition forces companies to improve productivity by upgrading their technology environment systems. Although this improvement could slow or regress at any time due to the recent concerns in the global capital markets, we believe that our organizational and financial structure will enable us to take advantage of any sustained economic rebound. While our sales pipelines have been improving, customers continue to take longer to evaluate discretionary software purchases than generally was the case prior to the economic downturn in 2001. BUSINESS OVERVIEW

We provide collaborative supply chain solutions to help streamline and optimize the management, production and distribution of products between manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, retailers, carriers and other organizations and their respective trading partners. The supply chain refers to the complex network of relationships that organizations maintain with trading partners (customers, suppliers and carriers) to source, manufacture, and deliver products and services to the customer and includes demand chain, supply chain, logistics, warehouse management and business-to-business process management for collaborative relationships between customers, suppliers and carriers. Our solutions help enterprises build competitive advantages and increase profitability by significantly reducing costs, increasing revenues, improving operational efficiencies and collaborating with suppliers and customers to more effectively respond to dynamic market conditions.

We derive revenue primarily from three sources: software licenses, services and other, and maintenance. We generally determine software license fees based on the number of modules, servers, users and/or sites licensed. Services and other revenues consist primarily of fees from software implementation, training, consulting and customization services. We primarily bill under time and materials arrangements and recognize revenues as we perform services. Maintenance agreements typically are for a one- to three-year term and usually are entered into at the time of the initial product license. We generally bill maintenance fees annually in advance and then recognize the resulting revenues ratably over the term of the maintenance agreement. Deferred revenues represent advance payments or billings for software licenses, services and maintenance billed in advance of the time we recognize the related revenues.

Our cost of revenue for licenses includes amortization of capitalized computer software development costs, salaries and benefits, and royalties paid to third-party software vendors as well as agent commission expenses related to license revenues generated by the indirect channel primarily from DMI. Costs for maintenance and services include the cost of personnel to conduct implementations and customer support, consulting, and other personnel-related expenses as well as agent commission expenses related to maintenance revenues generated by the indirect channel primarily from DMI. We account for the development costs of software intended for sale in accordance with SFAS No. 86, “Accounting for Costs of Computer Software to be Sold, Leased, or Otherwise Marketed.” We monitor the net realizable value of our capitalized software on a quarterly basis based on an estimate of future product revenues. We currently expect to fully recover the value of the capitalized software asset recorded on our consolidated balance sheet; however, if future product revenues are less than management’s current expectations, we may incur a write-down of capitalized software costs.

Gross product research and development costs include all non-capitalized and capitalized software development costs which principally include the salary and benefits for our development personnel. Our selling expenses generally include the salary and commissions paid to our sales professionals, along with marketing, promotional, travel and associated costs. Our general and administrative expenses generally include the salary and benefits paid to executive, corporate and support personnel, as well as office rent, utilities, communications expenses, and various professional fees.

We currently view the following factors as the primary opportunities and risks associated with our business:


•

The opportunity to expand the depth and number of strategic relationships with leading enterprise software providers, systems integrators and service providers to integrate our software solutions into their services and products and to create joint marketing opportunities; we currently have a number of marketing alliances, including those with SAP and IBM;

•

The opportunity for select acquisitions or investments to provide opportunities to expand our sales distribution channels, industry verticals, geographic reach and/or broaden our product offering by providing additional solutions for our target markets;


•

The risks associated with acquisitions of complementary companies, products and technologies, including the risks that we will not achieve the financial and strategic goals that we contemplate at the time of the transaction; specifically, in any acquisition we will face risks and challenges associated with the uncertain value of the acquired business or assets, the difficulty of assimilating operations and personnel, integrating acquired technologies and products and maintaining the loyalty of customers of the acquired business;


•

Our dependence on, and the risks associated with, the capital spending patterns of U.S. and international businesses, which in turn are functions of economic trends and conditions over which we have no control;


•

The risk that our competitors may develop technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to our technology; and


•

The risks inherent in the market for business application software and related services, which has been and continues to be intensely competitive; some of our competitors may become more aggressive with their prices and/or payment terms, which may adversely affect our profit margins.

A discussion of a number of additional risk factors associated with our business is included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2007.

COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS FOR THE THREE AND SIX MONTHS ENDED

OCTOBER 31, 2007 AND 2006:

REVENUES:

For the quarter ended October 31, 2007, the 11% increase in revenues from the three months ended October 31, 2006 was primarily attributable to increases in services and other and maintenance revenues and to a lesser extent increases in license fees. The primary reasons for these increases were an improved selling environment and better sales execution in contracting license fees in prior quarters, which resulted in increased implementation services billing and maintenance revenues when compared to the same period in the prior year. The increase in revenues for the six months ended October 31, 2007 compared to the same period last year was attributable to increases in all revenues streams, license fees, services and maintenance revenues. The primary reasons for these increases were an improved selling environment compared to the same period in the prior year. We believe that in recent quarters economic and industry conditions have improved, and market receptiveness to our products has improved as a result of an increase in business spending on supply chain software technology. International revenues represented approximately 16% of total revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007 and 15% of total revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2006. Our revenues, and particularly our international revenues, may fluctuate substantially from period to period primarily because we derive most of our license fee revenues from a relatively small number of customers in a given period. No single customer accounted for more than 10% of our total revenues in the three and six months ended October 31, 2007 and 2006.

LICENSES. The 2% and 22% increases in license fees in the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, respectively, compared to the same periods last year were primarily the result of the improved selling environment and better sales execution in contracting license fees. The direct sales channel provided approximately 52% and 56% of license fee revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, respectively, compared to approximately 54% and 63% of license fee revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2006, respectively. These decreases were due primarily to improved sales execution from our indirect channel. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, our margins after commissions on direct sales were approximately 79% and 84%, respectively, compared to 85% for the three and six months ended October 31, 2006. Our margin after commissions on direct sales for the three months ended October 31, 2007 was lower when compared to the same period in the prior year due to lower sales when compared to the same period in the prior year. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, our margins after commissions on indirect sales were approximately 50% compared to 48% and 44%, respectively, for the three and six months ended October 31,2006. Our margins after commissions on indirect sales for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007 were higher when compared to the same period in the prior year due to the mix of sales from our indirect channel, which has various commission rates. These margin calculations include only commission expense for comparative purposes and do not include other costs of license fees such as amortization of capitalized software.

SERVICES AND OTHER. The 28% and 35% increases in services and other revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, respectively, from the corresponding periods in the previous fiscal year, were primarily the result of an increase in overall software implementation project work as a result of increased license fee sales in recent quarters. We have observed that there is a tendency for services and other revenues to lag changes in license revenues by one to three quarters, as new licenses in one quarter often involve implementation and consulting services in subsequent quarters, for which we recognize revenues only as we perform those services.

MAINTENANCE. The 12% and 10% increases in maintenance revenues for the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, respectively, compared to the corresponding period in the previous fiscal year were primarily the result of the increase in license fees in the recent, which resulted in increased maintenance revenues in the current quarter. Typically, our maintenance revenues have had a direct relationship to current and historic license fee revenues, since new licenses are the potential source of new maintenance customers.

For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, the increase in total gross margin percentage was due primarily to a increase in maintenance and services gross margin percentages and to a lesser degree due to an increase in the license fee gross margin.

LICENSES. The gross margin percentage on license fees for the three months ended October 31, 2007 were the same when compared to the same period in the prior year, as our license fee revenues increased only slightly. The gross margin percentage on license fees for the six months ended October 31, 2007 increased due to the increase in license fee sales when compared to the same period in the prior year. License fee gross margin percentage tends to be directly related to the level of license fee revenues due to the relatively fixed cost of computer software amortization expense and amortization of acquired software, which are the primary components of cost of license fees. To a lesser degree, our license fee gross margin percentage in a given period is related to the variable expense of DMI’s agent commissions, and the proportion of license fees represented by DMI in that period.

SERVICES AND OTHER. For the three months and six months ended October 31, 2007, services gross margin percentage increased due primarily to improved staff utilization rates when compared to the same period in the prior fiscal year. Services and other gross margin normally is directly related to the level of services and other revenues. The primary component of cost of services and other revenues is services staffing, which is relatively fixed in the short term.

MAINTENANCE. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, maintenance gross margin percentage increased due to increased maintenance revenue as a result of higher license fee sales in the prior periods. The primary component of cost of maintenance revenues is staffing, which is relatively fixed in the short term.

OPERATING EXPENSES:

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. Gross product research and development costs include all non-capitalized and capitalized software development costs.

or the three months ended October 31, 2007, capitalized software development costs increased while gross product research and development costs increased when compared to the prior year period due to timing of project work. For the six months ended October 31, 2007, capitalized software development costs decreased slightly while gross product research and development costs increased when compared to the prior year period. The six-month change was due to increased research and development costs and a decrease in projects which qualify for capitalization. We expect capitalized product development costs to be lower in coming quarters as a result of fewer capitalizable R&D projects in the pipeline. However, we expect capitalized software amortization expense to remain relatively consistent to the current quarter for the remainder of fiscal 2008.

SALES AND MARKETING. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, sales and marketing expenses were $2.4 million and $4.9 million, respectively, which is consistent when compared to the three and six months ended October 31, 2006. We generally include commissions on indirect sales in cost of sales.

GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, general and administrative expenses were $1.3 million and $2.6 million, respectively. For the six months ended October 31, 2007, general and administrative expenses were higher primarily due to increases in employee variable compensation expense when compare to the same period in the prior years. As of October 31, 2007 and 2006, the number of employees were approximately 144 and 137, respectively.

AMORTIZATION OF ACQUISITION-RELATED INTANGIBLE ASSETS. Acquisition-related intangible assets of DMI are stated at historical cost and include certain intangible assets with definitive lives. We are amortizing these intangible assets on a straight-line basis over their expected useful lives of three to six years.

OTHER INCOME:

Other income is principally comprised of investment earnings. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, our investment earnings increased by approximately $77,000 and $143,000, respectively, when compared to the same periods last year, due primarily to an increase in the average cash balance. For the three and six months ended October 31, 2007, these investments generated an annualized yield of approximately 4.98% and 5.09%, respectively, compared to approximately 5.41% and 5.15%, respectively, for the three and six months ended October 31, 2006.

INCOME TAXES:

We are included in the consolidated federal income tax return filed by American Software; however, we provide for income taxes as if we were filing a separate income tax return. We recognize deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their tax bases. We measure deferred tax assets and liabilities using statutory tax rates in effect in the year in which we expect the differences to reverse. We establish a deferred tax asset for the expected future benefit of net operating loss and credit carry-forwards. Under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109 (“SFAS No. 109”), Accounting for Income Taxes , we cannot recognize a deferred tax asset for the future benefit of our net operating losses, tax credits and temporary differences unless we can establish that it is “more likely than not” that we would realize the deferred tax asset. We recorded $1.0 million in income tax expense in the quarter ended October 31, 2007 compared to $792,000 in the quarter ended October 31, 2006. We expect the Company’s effective tax rate to be in the range of 38% to 40% during fiscal year 2008.

LIQUIDITY, CAPITAL RESOURCES AND FINANCIAL CONDITION

Sources and Uses of Cash

We have historically funded, and continue to fund, our operations and capital expenditures primarily with cash generated from operating activities. The changes in net cash that operating activities provide generally reflect changes in our net earnings and non-cash operating items plus the effect of changes in our operating assets and liabilities, such as trade accounts receivable, trade accounts payable, accrued expenses and deferred revenue. We have no debt obligations or off-balance sheet financing arrangements, and therefore we use no cash for debt service purposes.

For the six months ended October 31, 2007, the increase in cash provided by operating activities when compared to the same period last year was due primarily to an increase in net earnings, a decrease in accounts receivable, and increases in tax benefit of stock options exercised, and amounts due from American Software, Inc. when compared to the same period last year. These changes were partially offset by a decrease in accounts payable and other accruals, excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation and a decrease in deferred revenue. The increase in cash provided by investing activities when compared to the same period in the prior year period was due primarily to net proceeds from sales and maturities of investments partially offset by additions to capital software development costs and equipment purchases. Cash provided by financing activities increased compared to the same period in the prior year, due primarily to the excess tax benefit from stock-based compensation and proceeds from stock option exercise. This was partially offset by repurchases of our common stock.

The increase in total cash generated for the six months ended October 31, 2007 when compared to cash generated in the comparable period in the prior year was due primarily to the changes in operating assets and liabilities noted above.

Days Sales Outstanding in accounts receivable were 52 days as of October 31, 2007, compared to 86 days as of October 31, 2006. The DSO decreased as of October 31, 2007 compared to October 31, 2006 due primarily to improved collections as well as the timing of closing license fees sales. Our current ratio on October 31, 2007 was 3.1 to 1, compared to 2.1 to 1 on October 31, 2006.

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